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Thread: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

  1. #41
    Christian Weisgerber Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    Nancy Young <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I never heard the term blitz used to mean pulse in the blender.
    > However, am I mistaken or is blitz not a German word for lightning?


    Yes, it's German for "flash, lightning bolt".
    English uses appear all derived from "Blitzkrieg".

    --
    Christian "naddy" Weisgerber [email protected]

  2. #42
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    >
    > I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use the
    > term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    >
    > What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?
    >
    > Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is it
    > so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing word?


    Because blitzing doesn't mean the same as blending?

    To me blending refers to amalgamating several ingredients into a
    smooth and different food (blend butter sugar, add eggs and blend, add
    flour and blend, result, raw sponge mixture).

    Blitzing refers to breaking up an ingredient into smaller particles of
    itself (machine-chopping a crust (into breadcrumbs) or herbs, nuts meat.

    Janet.

  3. #43
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 12:35:31 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    >says...
    >>
    >> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use the
    >> term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    >>
    >> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?
    >>
    >> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is it
    >> so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing word?

    >
    > Because blitzing doesn't mean the same as blending?
    >
    > To me blending refers to amalgamating several ingredients into a
    >smooth and different food (blend butter sugar, add eggs and blend, add
    >flour and blend, result, raw sponge mixture).
    >
    > Blitzing refers to breaking up an ingredient into smaller particles of
    >itself (machine-chopping a crust (into breadcrumbs) or herbs, nuts meat.
    >
    > Janet.


    If I lived in London or environs, I don't think I'd be so quick to use
    the word "blitz."

    Boron

  4. #44
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 10/11/2012 7:19 AM, Christian Weisgerber wrote:
    > Nancy Young <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I never heard the term blitz used to mean pulse in the blender.
    >> However, am I mistaken or is blitz not a German word for lightning?

    >
    > Yes, it's German for "flash, lightning bolt".
    > English uses appear all derived from "Blitzkrieg".


    I should have checked with my bruder, who has moved to Switzerland
    and excelling in his German studies. heh.

    I'm more familiar with the blitz in the (Am) football sense.

    nancy


  5. #45
    CDB Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 11/10/2012 5:14 AM, GordonD wrote:
    > "Guy Barry" <guy.barry@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:78tds.293602$[email protected]..
    >> "janice" wrote in message news:[email protected]..


    >>> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers
    >>> use the
    >>> term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.


    >>> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?


    >>> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why
    >>> is it
    >>> so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing word?


    >> I always took it as a humorous usage, like "nuke" for putting
    >> something in a microwave. But is there another single verb that means
    >> "to put in a blender"? "Blend" doesn't necessarily suggest the use of
    >> a blender to me.


    > Maybe we could derive one from the manufacturer's name, in the same way
    > that 'hoover' has come to mean 'use a vacuum cleaner, regardless of brand'?


    Father left the top off the blender and now he's waring his dacquiri.


  6. #46
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    Guy Barry <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "janice" wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers
    >> use the
    >> term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.

    >
    >> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of
    >> "blitz"?

    >
    >> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but
    >> why is it
    >> so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing
    >> word?

    >
    > I always took it as a humorous usage, like "nuke" for putting
    > something in a microwave. But is there another single verb that
    > means "to put in a blender"? "Blend" doesn't necessarily suggest the
    > use of a blender to me.


    Whiz.



  7. #47
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Oct 10, 10:48*pm, Steve Hayes <hayes...@telkomsa.net> wrote:
    > On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 20:04:53 -0400, tony cooper <tony.cooper...@gmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >I associate "blitz" with WWII, but have no idea when the word was
    > >coined.

    >
    > I think it was coined by the German military, who used "blitzkrieg" to
    > describe their swift attacks on Poland, Norway, Belgium, Luxembourg, the
    > Netherlands and France. The were helped in these by the "sitzkrieg" engaged in
    > by the French, who, after declaring war, sat on their bums and twiddled their
    > thumbs.


    The Germans took just about 30 days to conquer France in World War II..

  8. #48
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.


    >"Nasti J" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >>On Oct 10, 8:02 pm, "pavane"
    > >He was in the Army, recently retired. Now shut up.


    >You should have shut up before you misidentified his branch of the
    >service!


    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/army?s=t

    ar·my
    1.
    the military forces of a nation, exclusive of the navy and in some countries
    the air force.
    2.
    (in large military land forces) a unit consisting typically of two or more
    corps and a headquarters.
    3.
    a large body of persons trained and armed for war.
    4.
    any body of persons organized for any purpose: an army of census takers.
    5.
    a very large number or group of something; a great multitude; a host: the
    army of the unemployed.

    pavane



  9. #49
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Oct 10, 11:37*pm, R H Draney <dadoc...@spamcop.net> wrote:
    > Guy Barry filted:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >"janice" *wrote in messagenews:[email protected] ...

    >
    > >> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use
    > >> the
    > >> term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.

    >
    > >> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?

    >
    > >> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is
    > >> it
    > >> so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing word?

    >
    > >I always took it as a humorous usage, like "nuke" for putting something in a
    > >microwave. *But is there another single verb that means "to put in a
    > >blender"? *"Blend" doesn't necessarily suggest the use of a blender tome.

    >
    > Not when there's "chop", "stir", "liquefy", "puree", "crush", "emulsify",
    > "pulverize", "mix" and four other buttons....
    >
    > "Blitz" suggests the use of a reindeer....r
    >


    My classic blender has one toggle switch with two positions: Blend and
    "Blitz"

  10. #50
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    janice wrote:

    > I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use the
    > term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    >
    > What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?
    >
    > Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is it
    > so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing word?


    Damn whippersnappers! Leave well enough alone, why dontcha!



  11. #51
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.


    "tony cooper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    .............................
    > The Marines aren't the only military who have
    > brass to polish.

    ..............................
    > --
    > Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida


    Agreed, but we Marines were held to
    excruciatingly high standards.

    pavane - Sanford, Florida btw.



  12. #52
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    > "gloria p" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:k551c2$i35$[email protected]..
    > > On 10/10/2012 4:50 PM, janice wrote:
    > >> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use
    > >> the
    > >> term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    > >>
    > >> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?
    > >>
    > >> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is
    > >> it
    > >> so widespread when all it does is replace a perfectly good existing word?
    > >>

    > >
    > > I used to think it was strange when I would read or hear "whirr" or
    > > "whirl" to describe using a blender or food processor.

    >
    > I've only heard "whiz".


    Me too.

    (Oh no! I just made a Julie-style posting.)

  13. #53
    Frederick Williams Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    Dr Nick wrote:

    >
    > Well quite. Why on earth should "blitz" be from American?


    Because it abbreviates the German 'blitzkrieg' and there are many
    Americans of German origin?

    --
    Where are the songs of Summer?--With the sun,
    Oping the dusky eyelids of the south,
    Till shade and silence waken up as one,
    And morning sings with a warm odorous mouth.

  14. #54
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 08:30:15 -0800, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Julie Bove wrote:
    >>
    >> "gloria p" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:k551c2$i35$[email protected]..
    >> > On 10/10/2012 4:50 PM, janice wrote:
    >> >> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use
    >> >> the
    >> >> term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    >> >>
    >> >> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?
    >> >>
    >> >> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is
    >> >> it
    >> >> so widespread when all it does is replace a perfectly good existing word?
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> > I used to think it was strange when I would read or hear "whirr" or
    >> > "whirl" to describe using a blender or food processor.

    >>
    >> I've only heard "whiz".

    >
    >Me too.
    >
    >(Oh no! I just made a Julie-style posting.)


    Actually no, only males can whiz, females tinkle. LOL

  15. #55
    James Hogg Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    Frederick Williams wrote:
    > Dr Nick wrote:
    >
    >> Well quite. Why on earth should "blitz" be from American?

    >
    > Because it abbreviates the German 'blitzkrieg' and there are many
    > Americans of German origin?


    So when Hitler launched his Blitzkrieg against Britain, the Britons
    naturally borrowed a (previously unrecorded) word from American English
    to describe it?

    --
    James

  16. #56
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    James Hogg wrote:

    > So when Hitler launched his Blitzkrieg against Britain, the Britons
    > naturally borrowed a (previously unrecorded) word from American English
    > to describe it?


    Considering that Blitzkrieg entailed the use of armor and mounted
    artillery, you must be living in a dimension where Britiain is part of
    the European land mass instead of being separated by the sea.



  17. #57
    James Hogg Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    George M. Middius wrote:
    > James Hogg wrote:
    >
    >> So when Hitler launched his Blitzkrieg against Britain, the Britons
    >> naturally borrowed a (previously unrecorded) word from American English
    >> to describe it?

    >
    > Considering that Blitzkrieg entailed the use of armor and mounted
    > artillery, you must be living in a dimension where Britiain is part of
    > the European land mass instead of being separated by the sea.


    I can't argue against logic like that.

    --
    James

  18. #58
    S Viemeister Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 10/11/2012 5:06 PM, George M. Middius wrote:
    > James Hogg wrote:
    >
    >> So when Hitler launched his Blitzkrieg against Britain, the Britons
    >> naturally borrowed a (previously unrecorded) word from American English
    >> to describe it?

    >
    > Considering that Blitzkrieg entailed the use of armor and mounted
    > artillery, you must be living in a dimension where Britiain is part of
    > the European land mass instead of being separated by the sea.
    >

    Have you not heard of the London Blitz?


  19. #59
    R H Draney Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    James Hogg filted:
    >
    >Frederick Williams wrote:
    >> Dr Nick wrote:
    >>
    >>> Well quite. Why on earth should "blitz" be from American?

    >>
    >> Because it abbreviates the German 'blitzkrieg' and there are many
    >> Americans of German origin?

    >
    >So when Hitler launched his Blitzkrieg against Britain, the Britons
    >naturally borrowed a (previously unrecorded) word from American English
    >to describe it?


    There are certainly no Britons of German origin...apart from the royal family,
    that is....r


    --
    Me? Sarcastic?
    Yeah, right.

  20. #60
    Peter Duncanson (BrE) Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 17:29:58 -0400, S Viemeister
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 10/11/2012 5:06 PM, George M. Middius wrote:
    >> James Hogg wrote:
    >>
    >>> So when Hitler launched his Blitzkrieg against Britain, the Britons
    >>> naturally borrowed a (previously unrecorded) word from American English
    >>> to describe it?

    >>
    >> Considering that Blitzkrieg entailed the use of armor and mounted
    >> artillery, you must be living in a dimension where Britiain is part of
    >> the European land mass instead of being separated by the sea.
    >>

    >Have you not heard of the London Blitz?


    The earliest examples of the use of "Blitzkrieg" quoted in the OED are:

    1939 War Illustr. 7 Oct. 108/1 In the opening stage of the war
    all eyes were turned on Poland, where the German military machine
    was engaged in Blitz-Krieg—lightning war—with a view to ending as
    soon as possible.

    1939 War Illustr. 9 Dec. 386/3 Everything was ready for the
    opening of the ‘Blitzkrieg’ on the West.

    The War Illustrated was a British magazine:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_War_Illustrated

    The OED's earliest quotes using "blitz" are from a British newspaper:

    1940 Daily Express 9 Sept. 1 Blitz bombing of London goes on all
    night.
    1940 Daily Express 10 Sept. 1/1 In his three-day blitz on London
    Goering has now lost 140 planes.

    It seems very likely that that was a British adoption of a German word
    which was already known from reporting of German attacks in Europe.


    --
    Peter Duncanson, UK
    (in alt.english.usage)

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