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Thread: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

  1. #21
    Malcom \Mal\ Reynolds Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    In article <k55d0g$8e1$[email protected]>, "Julie Bove" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    > I do have a husband and he was in the Coast Guard. Whether or ever used
    > that cloth, I do not know.


    Gee, up until now he has been in the Army. Are you losing track of your
    imaginary life?

  2. #22
    tony cooper Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 19:41:25 -0700 (PDT), Nasti J
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Oct 10, 7:33*pm, "pavane" <pav...@leisure.org> wrote:
    >> "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote in message
    >>

    >
    >> > I'm in the US and I've never heard it.

    >>
    >> Ask your husband. Every US Marine has used Blitz Cloth

    >
    >
    >A) I'm pretty sure she's heard the word blitz, just not used as
    >decribed un the original post.
    >B) You don't whether she even HAS a husband, and even if she does, the
    >odds of him having been a Marine aree really low.


    I mentioned having Blitz polishing products in the house in an earlier
    post. I've used it for years, but don't remember when I first
    purchased their product or knew about it. I could very well have been
    when I was in the Army. The Marines aren't the only military who have
    brass to polish.




    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida

  3. #23
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 00:34:56 -0400, tony cooper
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I mentioned having Blitz polishing products in the house in an earlier
    > post. I've used it for years, but don't remember when I first
    > purchased their product or knew about it. I could very well have been
    > when I was in the Army. The Marines aren't the only military who have
    > brass to polish.


    Can you buy it from the local hardware store or do you have to resort
    to the internet?

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  4. #24
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.


    "tony cooper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 19:41:25 -0700 (PDT), Nasti J
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Oct 10, 7:33 pm, "pavane" <pav...@leisure.org> wrote:
    >>> "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote in message
    >>>

    >>
    >>> > I'm in the US and I've never heard it.
    >>>
    >>> Ask your husband. Every US Marine has used Blitz Cloth

    >>
    >>
    >>A) I'm pretty sure she's heard the word blitz, just not used as
    >>decribed un the original post.
    >>B) You don't whether she even HAS a husband, and even if she does, the
    >>odds of him having been a Marine aree really low.

    >
    > I mentioned having Blitz polishing products in the house in an earlier
    > post. I've used it for years, but don't remember when I first
    > purchased their product or knew about it. I could very well have been
    > when I was in the Army. The Marines aren't the only military who have
    > brass to polish.


    My husband used a very flammable brass polish but I don't remember the name.
    Came in a can and it had wadding cloth in it. Let me see if I can find it
    by a search. Yep. NEVR-DULL.



  5. #25
    tony cooper Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 21:56:35 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"tony cooper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >> On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 19:41:25 -0700 (PDT), Nasti J
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Oct 10, 7:33 pm, "pavane" <pav...@leisure.org> wrote:
    >>>> "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote in message
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>> > I'm in the US and I've never heard it.
    >>>>
    >>>> Ask your husband. Every US Marine has used Blitz Cloth
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>A) I'm pretty sure she's heard the word blitz, just not used as
    >>>decribed un the original post.
    >>>B) You don't whether she even HAS a husband, and even if she does, the
    >>>odds of him having been a Marine aree really low.

    >>
    >> I mentioned having Blitz polishing products in the house in an earlier
    >> post. I've used it for years, but don't remember when I first
    >> purchased their product or knew about it. I could very well have been
    >> when I was in the Army. The Marines aren't the only military who have
    >> brass to polish.

    >
    >My husband used a very flammable brass polish but I don't remember the name.
    >Came in a can and it had wadding cloth in it. Let me see if I can find it
    >by a search. Yep. NEVR-DULL.
    >


    I have that product, too. It is not a polish like Blitz that applied,
    allowed to dry, and buffed off. The NEVR-DULL "wadding" is
    impregnated with some chemical. The wadding is rubbed on the object
    and used until it turns very black. We polish silver with it.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida

  6. #26
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Oct 10, 5:05*pm, tony cooper <tony.cooper...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 00:05:31 +0100, Jack Campin
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > <bo...@purr.demon.co.uk> wrote:
    > >> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use
    > >> the *term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.

    >
    > >> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?

    >
    > >> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why
    > >> is it so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing
    > >> word?

    >
    > >Since Britain got much more thoroughly blitzed than the US and has
    > >retained the folk memory of its blitzification with a lot of
    > >circumstantial detail, I'd expect it to be an indigenous British
    > >usage.

    >
    > >"Blitz" in BrE more often means "clean thoroughly".

    >
    > Quite a few Americans, and this one included, have a container of
    > Blitz polish in the closet. *Blitz is best-known for a jewelry
    > cleaning polish and treated jewelry polishing cloths.


    I've bought Flitz but never Blitz.

    www.flitz-polish.com/


  7. #27
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.


    "tony cooper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 21:56:35 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"tony cooper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected] ..
    >>> On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 19:41:25 -0700 (PDT), Nasti J
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On Oct 10, 7:33 pm, "pavane" <pav...@leisure.org> wrote:
    >>>>> "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote in message
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> > I'm in the US and I've never heard it.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Ask your husband. Every US Marine has used Blitz Cloth
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>A) I'm pretty sure she's heard the word blitz, just not used as
    >>>>decribed un the original post.
    >>>>B) You don't whether she even HAS a husband, and even if she does, the
    >>>>odds of him having been a Marine aree really low.
    >>>
    >>> I mentioned having Blitz polishing products in the house in an earlier
    >>> post. I've used it for years, but don't remember when I first
    >>> purchased their product or knew about it. I could very well have been
    >>> when I was in the Army. The Marines aren't the only military who have
    >>> brass to polish.

    >>
    >>My husband used a very flammable brass polish but I don't remember the
    >>name.
    >>Came in a can and it had wadding cloth in it. Let me see if I can find it
    >>by a search. Yep. NEVR-DULL.
    >>

    >
    > I have that product, too. It is not a polish like Blitz that applied,
    > allowed to dry, and buffed off. The NEVR-DULL "wadding" is
    > impregnated with some chemical. The wadding is rubbed on the object
    > and used until it turns very black. We polish silver with it.


    AFAIK the only thing my husand ever used it for was his belt buckle but he
    did say it was commonly used on ships.



  8. #28
    Steve Hayes Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 23:50:58 +0100, janice <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use the
    >term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    >
    >What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?
    >
    >Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is it
    >so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing word?


    I would have thought that the AmE term would be "zap".


    --
    Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
    Blog: http://khanya.wordpress.com
    E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk

  9. #29
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 01:06:57 -0400, tony cooper
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have that product, too. It is not a polish like Blitz that applied,
    > allowed to dry, and buffed off. The NEVR-DULL "wadding" is
    > impregnated with some chemical. The wadding is rubbed on the object
    > and used until it turns very black. We polish silver with it.


    I've used chrome polish (simichrome) on my silver and it worked in
    pretty much the same manner except I had to provide my own wiping
    cloths.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  10. #30
    Guy Barry Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.



    "janice" wrote in message news:[email protected]..

    > I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use
    > the
    > term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.


    > What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?


    > Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is
    > it
    > so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing word?


    I always took it as a humorous usage, like "nuke" for putting something in a
    microwave. But is there another single verb that means "to put in a
    blender"? "Blend" doesn't necessarily suggest the use of a blender to me.

    --
    Guy Barry


  11. #31
    Steve Hayes Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 20:04:53 -0400, tony cooper <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I associate "blitz" with WWII, but have no idea when the word was
    >coined.


    I think it was coined by the German military, who used "blitzkrieg" to
    describe their swift attacks on Poland, Norway, Belgium, Luxembourg, the
    Netherlands and France. The were helped in these by the "sitzkrieg" engaged in
    by the French, who, after declaring war, sat on their bums and twiddled their
    thumbs.


    --
    Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
    Blog: http://khanya.wordpress.com
    E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk

  12. #32
    Harrison Hill Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Oct 11, 3:29*am, Nasti J <njgill...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Oct 10, 4:41*pm, Dr Nick <nospa...@temporary-address.org.uk> wrote:
    > .
    >
    >
    >
    > > It does "let's blitz the house this weekend", but it can mean to make a
    > > sudden approach (dare I say "lightening attack")

    >
    > Only if you're attacking with bleach


    That is beyond the pale.

  13. #33
    ProfIJM Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 11/10/12 01:04, tony cooper wrote:
    > On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 00:05:31 +0100, Jack Campin
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use
    >>> the term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    >>>
    >>> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?
    >>>
    >>> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why
    >>> is it so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing
    >>> word?

    >>
    >> Since Britain got much more thoroughly blitzed than the US and has
    >> retained the folk memory of its blitzification with a lot of
    >> circumstantial detail, I'd expect it to be an indigenous British
    >> usage.
    >>
    >> "Blitz" in BrE more often means "clean thoroughly".

    >
    > Quite a few Americans, and this one included, have a container of
    > Blitz polish in the closet. Blitz is best-known for a jewelry
    > cleaning polish and treated jewelry polishing cloths.
    >
    > The company was founded in 1912 and the products were developed then.
    > The company's history page does not say if the original name of the
    > company or the product was "Blitz", though.
    >
    > I associate "blitz" with WWII, but have no idea when the word was
    > coined.
    >


    My immediate guess regarding its American usage as the name of a
    jewellery polish would be its similarity to "glitz".

    Pretty much all British usage derives from the use of "blitzkrieg" in
    British newspaper headlines from the beginning of WWII onwards.

    It's a great sounding word but, in agreement with the original poster, I
    must say I find its recent and incessant use by people such as Lorraine
    Pascale to mean simply "blend" an irritating pathetic attempt to be
    "down with the kids" - much like the dancing/tracking captions
    (mimicking certain mobile phone apps) which seem to have first appeared
    on the same show but are now infecting a number of others.

    I,JM

  14. #34
    Nasti J Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Oct 10, 8:02*pm, "pavane"
    > He was in the Army, recently retired. Now shut up.


    You should have shut up before you misidentified his branch of the
    service!

  15. #35
    R H Draney Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    Guy Barry filted:
    >
    >
    >
    >"janice" wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    >
    >> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use
    >> the
    >> term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.

    >
    >> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?

    >
    >> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is
    >> it
    >> so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing word?

    >
    >I always took it as a humorous usage, like "nuke" for putting something in a
    >microwave. But is there another single verb that means "to put in a
    >blender"? "Blend" doesn't necessarily suggest the use of a blender to me.


    Not when there's "chop", "stir", "liquefy", "puree", "crush", "emulsify",
    "pulverize", "mix" and four other buttons....

    "Blitz" suggests the use of a reindeer....r


    --
    Me? Sarcastic?
    Yeah, right.

  16. #36
    Dr Nick Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    "Guy Barry" <[email protected]> writes:

    > "janice" wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    >> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers
    >> use the term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period
    >> of time.

    >
    >> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of
    >> "blitz"?

    >
    >> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but
    >> why is it so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good
    >> existing word?

    >
    > I always took it as a humorous usage, like "nuke" for putting
    > something in a microwave. But is there another single verb that means
    > "to put in a blender"? "Blend" doesn't necessarily suggest the use of
    > a blender to me.


    "Wizz" or "Whizz". You can get plenty of hits showing it if you search
    for >wizz for nn seconds< (or with whizz, and where nn is a small round
    number like 5 or 10 or 30)

  17. #37
    ProfIJM Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 11/10/12 06:52, Guy Barry wrote:
    >
    >
    > "janice" wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    >
    >> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers
    >> use the
    >> term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.

    >
    >> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?

    >
    >> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why
    >> is it
    >> so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing word?

    >
    > I always took it as a humorous usage, like "nuke" for putting something
    > in a microwave. But is there another single verb that means "to put in
    > a blender"? "Blend" doesn't necessarily suggest the use of a blender to
    > me.
    >

    Personally, I'd rather hear the word "muller". At least it has a
    potential definition (crunch something up via a pestle and mortar)
    reasonably close to the action being described.

    I,JM


  18. #38
    ProfIJM Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 11/10/12 07:37, R H Draney wrote:
    > Guy Barry filted:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "janice" wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    >>
    >>> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use
    >>> the
    >>> term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.

    >>
    >>> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?

    >>
    >>> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is
    >>> it
    >>> so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing word?

    >>
    >> I always took it as a humorous usage, like "nuke" for putting something in a
    >> microwave. But is there another single verb that means "to put in a
    >> blender"? "Blend" doesn't necessarily suggest the use of a blender to me.

    >
    > Not when there's "chop", "stir", "liquefy", "puree", "crush", "emulsify",
    > "pulverize", "mix" and four other buttons....


    Perhaps "blitz" is the new "eleven".

    > "Blitz" suggests the use of a reindeer....r


    Other settings: "dash", "dance" and "prance"...?

    I,JM



  19. #39
    GordonD Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    "Guy Barry" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:78tds.293602$[email protected]..
    >
    >
    > "janice" wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    >
    >> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use
    >> the
    >> term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.

    >
    >> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?

    >
    >> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is
    >> it
    >> so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing word?

    >
    > I always took it as a humorous usage, like "nuke" for putting something in
    > a microwave. But is there another single verb that means "to put in a
    > blender"? "Blend" doesn't necessarily suggest the use of a blender to me.



    Maybe we could derive one from the manufacturer's name, in the same way that
    'hoover' has come to mean 'use a vacuum cleaner, regardless of brand'?
    --
    Gordon Davie
    Edinburgh, Scotland

    "Slipped the surly bonds of Earth...to touch the face of God."


  20. #40
    Peter Duncanson (BrE) Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 22:58:56 -0700 (PDT), Harrison Hill
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Oct 11, 3:29*am, Nasti J <njgill...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> On Oct 10, 4:41*pm, Dr Nick <nospa...@temporary-address.org.uk> wrote:
    >> .
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > It does "let's blitz the house this weekend", but it can mean to make a
    >> > sudden approach (dare I say "lightening attack")

    >>
    >> Only if you're attacking with bleach

    >
    >That is beyond the pale.


    Very good!

    --
    Peter Duncanson, UK
    (in alt.english.usage)

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