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Thread: The ungrateful guest

  1. #1
    cshenk Guest

    Default The ungrateful guest

    I have to admit, I am a bit appalled at the number of posts seen here
    where people were offered a free dinner and have nothing to say
    afterwards but how 'crappy' they felt it was.

    Me generation people can be so boring. If you complained about a meal
    gifted to you, the only appropriate reply is to offer to cook it for
    them next year. Don't be shocked if they think your cooking is as bad
    as you think theirs is.

    Thanksgiving here was simple. We invited Mike and Deidra. Mike is 45
    and has downs syndrome. Deidra is his mom who is 92 and Mike takes
    care of her while also working at a local store as a restocker.

    Mike is lactose intolerant and Deidra is diabetic. Our traditional
    meal worked well enough for both with portion control and our only
    adption was to not add milk/cream/sour cream to the mashed potatoes but
    to have them on the side. I did have to make a second gravy for Mike
    but I did that the day before (he likes my bean gravy with aded garlic
    which takes all of 3 minutes to make from leftover crockpot beans).

    We all had a good time and if Deidra dreams of fantastic turkeys she
    has made in the past, she was not at all upset at my simpler faire.
    With just 5 of us, I didn't go all out this time. The only fancy
    addition was she showed me how to make real kiwi/cranberry sauce, her
    way.

    --


  2. #2
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    what a wonderful day
    "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I have to admit, I am a bit appalled at the number of posts seen here
    > where people were offered a free dinner and have nothing to say
    > afterwards but how 'crappy' they felt it was.
    >
    > Me generation people can be so boring. If you complained about a meal
    > gifted to you, the only appropriate reply is to offer to cook it for
    > them next year. Don't be shocked if they think your cooking is as bad
    > as you think theirs is.
    >
    > Thanksgiving here was simple. We invited Mike and Deidra. Mike is 45
    > and has downs syndrome. Deidra is his mom who is 92 and Mike takes
    > care of her while also working at a local store as a restocker.
    >
    > Mike is lactose intolerant and Deidra is diabetic. Our traditional
    > meal worked well enough for both with portion control and our only
    > adption was to not add milk/cream/sour cream to the mashed potatoes but
    > to have them on the side. I did have to make a second gravy for Mike
    > but I did that the day before (he likes my bean gravy with aded garlic
    > which takes all of 3 minutes to make from leftover crockpot beans).
    >
    > We all had a good time and if Deidra dreams of fantastic turkeys she
    > has made in the past, she was not at all upset at my simpler faire.
    > With just 5 of us, I didn't go all out this time. The only fancy
    > addition was she showed me how to make real kiwi/cranberry sauce, her
    > way.
    >
    > --
    >




  3. #3
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    On 26/11/2011 3:19 PM, cshenk wrote:
    > I have to admit, I am a bit appalled at the number of posts seen here
    > where people were offered a free dinner and have nothing to say
    > afterwards but how 'crappy' they felt it was.
    >
    > Me generation people can be so boring. If you complained about a meal
    > gifted to you, the only appropriate reply is to offer to cook it for
    > them next year. Don't be shocked if they think your cooking is as bad
    > as you think theirs is.
    >



    Tell me about it. When I had my brother and his family (wife, two grown
    sons, a daughter in and and two grandchildren) here a few years ago, the
    oldest son (over 30) pouted because there was nothing for dessert that
    he liked. I all the usual Christmas stuff that is traditional in our
    family, a Christmas pudding, dark fruitcake, light fruitcake, several
    types of shortbread cookies, browns, Black forest squares, mince meat
    tarts, macaroons and a few others, plus a platter of fruit. Out of all
    that there was nothing he liked.... and he whined about it like a child.
    We had them one more time, and I asked his mother to bring something
    that he would like for dessert.

    My wife wants to invite them again and I just can't see putting myself
    in that position again.


    Besides... their other son is a chef. He could probably do better than
    us.

  4. #4
    Cheri Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I have to admit, I am a bit appalled at the number of posts seen here
    > where people were offered a free dinner and have nothing to say
    > afterwards but how 'crappy' they felt it was.
    >
    > Me generation people can be so boring. If you complained about a meal
    > gifted to you, the only appropriate reply is to offer to cook it for
    > them next year. Don't be shocked if they think your cooking is as bad
    > as you think theirs is.


    Truly! People who think they are the *end all be all* of cooking are the
    most boring of all IMO.

    Cheri


  5. #5
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    On Nov 26, 3:37*pm, Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    > On 26/11/2011 3:19 PM, cshenk wrote:
    >
    > > I have to admit, I am a bit appalled at the number of posts seen here
    > > where people were offered a free dinner and have nothing to say
    > > afterwards but how 'crappy' they felt it was.

    >
    > > Me generation people can be so boring. *If you complained about a meal
    > > gifted to you, the only appropriate reply is to offer to cook it for
    > > them next year. *Don't be shocked if they think your cooking is as bad
    > > as you think theirs is.

    >
    > Tell me about it. When I had my brother and his family (wife, two grown
    > sons, a daughter in and and two grandchildren) here a few years ago, the
    > oldest son (over 30) pouted because there was nothing for dessert that
    > he liked. *I all the usual Christmas stuff that is traditional in our
    > family, a Christmas pudding, dark fruitcake, light fruitcake, several
    > types of shortbread cookies, browns, Black forest squares, mince meat
    > tarts, macaroons and a few others, plus a platter of fruit. *Out of all
    > that there was nothing he liked.... and he whined about it like a child.
    > * We had them one more time, and I asked his mother to bring something
    > that he would like for dessert.
    >
    > My wife wants to invite them again and I just can't see putting myself
    > in that position again.
    >
    > Besides... their other son is a chef. *He could probably do better thanus


    The jerk probably sought Twinkies. I'd have wanted to slug 'im.

  6. #6
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    On 2011-11-26, cshenk <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I have to admit, I am a bit appalled at the number of posts seen here
    > where people were offered a free dinner and have nothing to say
    > afterwards but how 'crappy' they felt it was.


    Those posts are different from you bitching and moaning about other
    posters, how?

    nb

  7. #7
    BillyZoom Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    On Nov 26, 4:17*pm, notbob <not...@nothome.com> wrote:
    > On 2011-11-26, cshenk <cshe...@cox.net> wrote:
    >
    > > I have to admit, I am a bit appalled at the number of posts seen here
    > > where people were offered a free dinner and have nothing to say
    > > afterwards but how 'crappy' they felt it was.

    >
    > Those posts are different from you bitching and moaning about other
    > posters, how?
    >
    > nb


    Because we're all family here. The Addams Family. Guess which one is
    you Julie Bovine?

  8. #8
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    Storrmmee wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > what a wonderful day


    It was indeed Lee! Simple sort of affair. The gals chatted and the
    guys went to go play in Don's 'Man Cave'. Fact is, other than Deidre
    showing me her recipe (I made it, she can't reach the stove from her
    wheelchair) us 3 ladies pretty much watched movies and heckled the guys
    on 'is it done yet?' calls.

    PS Don is sligtly miffed. Mike beat him 3 out of 4 times on his
    favorite fishing game. Should have heard them whooping!


    > "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > > I have to admit, I am a bit appalled at the number of posts seen
    > > here where people were offered a free dinner and have nothing to say
    > > afterwards but how 'crappy' they felt it was.
    > >
    > > Me generation people can be so boring. If you complained about a
    > > meal gifted to you, the only appropriate reply is to offer to cook
    > > it for them next year. Don't be shocked if they think your cooking
    > > is as bad as you think theirs is.
    > >
    > > Thanksgiving here was simple. We invited Mike and Deidra. Mike is
    > > 45 and has downs syndrome. Deidra is his mom who is 92 and Mike
    > > takes care of her while also working at a local store as a
    > > restocker.
    > >
    > > Mike is lactose intolerant and Deidra is diabetic. Our traditional
    > > meal worked well enough for both with portion control and our only
    > > adption was to not add milk/cream/sour cream to the mashed potatoes
    > > but to have them on the side. I did have to make a second gravy
    > > for Mike but I did that the day before (he likes my bean gravy with
    > > aded garlic which takes all of 3 minutes to make from leftover
    > > crockpot beans).
    > >
    > > We all had a good time and if Deidra dreams of fantastic turkeys she
    > > has made in the past, she was not at all upset at my simpler faire.
    > > With just 5 of us, I didn't go all out this time. The only fancy
    > > addition was she showed me how to make real kiwi/cranberry sauce,
    > > her way.
    > >
    > > --




    --


  9. #9
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    Dave Smith wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > On 26/11/2011 3:19 PM, cshenk wrote:
    > > I have to admit, I am a bit appalled at the number of posts seen
    > > here where people were offered a free dinner and have nothing to say
    > > afterwards but how 'crappy' they felt it was.
    > >
    > > Me generation people can be so boring. If you complained about a
    > > meal gifted to you, the only appropriate reply is to offer to cook
    > > it for them next year. Don't be shocked if they think your cooking
    > > is as bad as you think theirs is.
    > >

    >
    >
    > Tell me about it. When I had my brother and his family (wife, two
    > grown sons, a daughter in and and two grandchildren) here a few years
    > ago, the oldest son (over 30) pouted because there was nothing for
    > dessert that he liked. I all the usual Christmas stuff that is
    > traditional in our family, a Christmas pudding, dark fruitcake, light
    > fruitcake, several types of shortbread cookies, browns, Black forest
    > squares, mince meat tarts, macaroons and a few others, plus a platter
    > of fruit. Out of all that there was nothing he liked.... and he
    > whined about it like a child. We had them one more time, and I
    > asked his mother to bring something that he would like for dessert.
    >
    > My wife wants to invite them again and I just can't see putting
    > myself in that position again.
    >
    >
    > Besides... their other son is a chef. He could probably do better
    > than us.


    Yeah, I hear ya. To me, when I open my home as we do very regular, I
    expect happy people to enjoy what we have on offer. Unlike some, we do
    not at all mind 'special needs diets' and will accomodate. We may not
    be fancy chefs, but we can hit a larger dinner group with diabetic, low
    carb, low sodium, low fat, and low protein all at once with no trouble.
    We automatically hit the low gluten and low cholestrol set.

    I'd tell the wife, no. He's a PITA but if it's a large group where you
    can't eliminate one PITA person, you are kinda stuck.

    --


  10. #10
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    Cheri wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > > I have to admit, I am a bit appalled at the number of posts seen
    > > here where people were offered a free dinner and have nothing to say
    > > afterwards but how 'crappy' they felt it was.
    > >
    > > Me generation people can be so boring. If you complained about a
    > > meal gifted to you, the only appropriate reply is to offer to cook
    > > it for them next year. Don't be shocked if they think your cooking
    > > is as bad as you think theirs is.

    >
    > Truly! People who think they are the *end all be all* of cooking are
    > the most boring of all IMO.
    >
    > Cheri


    Yup! Posted a simple one we have tonight. It's not haute cuisine.
    Much more interesting was reading the person who wrapped riccotta in
    luncheon meat and lightly cooked it for a late munchie.

    --


  11. #11
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    On 26/11/2011 4:03 PM, Kalmia wrote:

    >> My wife wants to invite them again and I just can't see putting myself
    >> in that position again.
    >>
    >> Besides... their other son is a chef. He could probably do better than us

    >
    > The jerk probably sought Twinkies. I'd have wanted to slug 'im.


    I did want to slug him. It was a few years before he was invited back.
    I realize that not everyone likes Christmas pudding, mine meat and
    fruitcake, but there were several other things.... plus the fruit
    platter. If he couldn't find anything there, tough beans. It was the
    way he whined that irked me.

    You're not far off with the Twinkies. What his mother brought was a
    chocolate wafer and whipped cream "cake".


  12. #12
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    notbob wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > On 2011-11-26, cshenk <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > I have to admit, I am a bit appalled at the number of posts seen
    > > here where people were offered a free dinner and have nothing to say
    > > afterwards but how 'crappy' they felt it was.

    >
    > Those posts are different from you bitching and moaning about other
    > posters, how?
    >
    > nb


    I'm rare to bitch and moan about others. You can probably find some of
    mine, but you will have to hunt for a bit to find one.

    --


  13. #13
    sf Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    On Sat, 26 Nov 2011 15:54:02 -0600, "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Much more interesting was reading the person who wrapped riccotta in
    > luncheon meat and lightly cooked it for a late munchie.


    I liked that idea too and I'm not low carbing it. Wish more people
    would post simple things like that, but I know why we don't. It's
    because of the people who find fault with everything and harp about
    what they think is wrong.


    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  14. #14
    sf Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    On Sat, 26 Nov 2011 16:55:18 -0500, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What his mother brought was a chocolate wafer and whipped cream "cake".


    Oh, lordy how I love those things! Believe it or not I haven't eaten
    one since I was a Sophomore in High School, but I remember them
    fondly.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  15. #15
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    good, Lee
    "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ...
    > Storrmmee wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    >> what a wonderful day

    >
    > It was indeed Lee! Simple sort of affair. The gals chatted and the
    > guys went to go play in Don's 'Man Cave'. Fact is, other than Deidre
    > showing me her recipe (I made it, she can't reach the stove from her
    > wheelchair) us 3 ladies pretty much watched movies and heckled the guys
    > on 'is it done yet?' calls.
    >
    > PS Don is sligtly miffed. Mike beat him 3 out of 4 times on his
    > favorite fishing game. Should have heard them whooping!
    >
    >
    >> "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >> > I have to admit, I am a bit appalled at the number of posts seen
    >> > here where people were offered a free dinner and have nothing to say
    >> > afterwards but how 'crappy' they felt it was.
    >> >
    >> > Me generation people can be so boring. If you complained about a
    >> > meal gifted to you, the only appropriate reply is to offer to cook
    >> > it for them next year. Don't be shocked if they think your cooking
    >> > is as bad as you think theirs is.
    >> >
    >> > Thanksgiving here was simple. We invited Mike and Deidra. Mike is
    >> > 45 and has downs syndrome. Deidra is his mom who is 92 and Mike
    >> > takes care of her while also working at a local store as a
    >> > restocker.
    >> >
    >> > Mike is lactose intolerant and Deidra is diabetic. Our traditional
    >> > meal worked well enough for both with portion control and our only
    >> > adption was to not add milk/cream/sour cream to the mashed potatoes
    >> > but to have them on the side. I did have to make a second gravy
    >> > for Mike but I did that the day before (he likes my bean gravy with
    >> > aded garlic which takes all of 3 minutes to make from leftover
    >> > crockpot beans).
    >> >
    >> > We all had a good time and if Deidra dreams of fantastic turkeys she
    >> > has made in the past, she was not at all upset at my simpler faire.
    >> > With just 5 of us, I didn't go all out this time. The only fancy
    >> > addition was she showed me how to make real kiwi/cranberry sauce,
    >> > her way.
    >> >
    >> > --

    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >




  16. #16
    z z Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    The guest is only ungrateful if the hostess has been insulted. You have
    insulted posters in this group who are expressing their opinions of
    food-not to their hostess, but to their fellow posters, because it is
    after all a food forum, not a Miss Manners forum.

    For examply, my post, meant to be wryly humorous, about Nu-Wave oven
    could very well help a fellow poster in the future who wants to buy/try
    Nu-Wave oven.

    That doesn't mean that I don't appreciate all my hostess attempted to
    do-and you would have to be my mother's daughter to understand anything
    about our situation, so don't presume to lecture us about how you are
    Mother Teresa and we are not. Taking smug pride in yourself is a sin.


  17. #17
    Cheri Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    "z z" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..

    > That doesn't mean that I don't appreciate all my hostess attempted to
    > do-and you would have to be my mother's daughter to understand anything
    > about our situation, so don't presume to lecture us about how you are
    > Mother Teresa and we are not. Taking smug pride in yourself is a sin.



    Or taking *smug pride* in your own cooking, ingredients, traditions etc.,
    while knocking everyone elses is to be frowned upon as well IMO.

    Cheri


  18. #18
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    On 26/11/2011 4:50 PM, cshenk wrote:
    that he would like for dessert.
    >>
    >> My wife wants to invite them again and I just can't see putting
    >> myself in that position again.
    >>
    >>
    >> Besides... their other son is a chef. He could probably do better
    >> than us.

    >
    > Yeah, I hear ya. To me, when I open my home as we do very regular, I
    > expect happy people to enjoy what we have on offer. Unlike some, we do
    > not at all mind 'special needs diets' and will accomodate. We may not
    > be fancy chefs, but we can hit a larger dinner group with diabetic, low
    > carb, low sodium, low fat, and low protein all at once with no trouble.
    > We automatically hit the low gluten and low cholestrol set.
    >
    > I'd tell the wife, no. He's a PITA but if it's a large group where you
    > can't eliminate one PITA person, you are kinda stuck.
    >



    I think that I can honestly describe myself as a thankful guest. it is
    nice t be invited to someone's home and to be given a meal and drinks.
    I do not expect great things. IMO the most important thing is the
    hospitality. That being said, I can admit that our neighbour is not
    great in the kitchen. She has invited us over for dinner a few times. I
    don't expect much from her. Her food is not great, but we have a good
    time, and that is the important thing.

  19. #19
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    On 2011-11-26, cshenk <[email protected]> wrote:

    > mine, but you will have to hunt for a bit to find one.


    11/26/11

    "I have to admit, I am a bit appalled.... "

    nb

  20. #20
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: The ungrateful guest

    "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have to admit, I am a bit appalled at the number of posts seen here
    > where people were offered a free dinner and have nothing to say
    > afterwards but how 'crappy' they felt it was.



    I was practically the most unwanted member of the family!

    If I had a nickel for every time I was told to "LEAVE SOME FOR THE
    GUESTS!", I probably could've retired before high school, or been presumed
    dead! <G>

    Andy

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