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Thread: uncle ben's tortillas

  1. #21
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas

    Sqwertz wrote:

    >>>> Are they corn or flour?


    >>> I thought old unk Ben was black.


    >> He is!


    > He sure looks white to me.


    That ha snothing to do with Uncle Ben's brand. I feared you were getting
    these, which I do no trecommend:
    https://fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.n...24_42798_n.jpg
    --
    Firma predefinita



  2. #22
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas

    Julie Bove wrote:

    >>> UNcle Ben's Tortillas? That kinda funny. A White guy's name on a
    >>> brand of tortillas. Only in Italy, I guess!


    >> I thought old unk Ben was black.


    > He is!


    Yes, and here is the logo on their italian stuff:
    http://www.mysavings.com/img/link/large/5400.jpg
    --
    Firma predefinita



  3. #23
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas

    Julie Bove wrote:

    > What are they made of? I don't think we get them here.


    Wheat. So this Uncle Ben's brand has a line of mexican products which they
    sell only in Europe? Do they sell just rice in the US? The marvels of
    nowadays market
    --
    Firma predefinita



  4. #24
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas

    Leonard Blaisdell wrote:

    > I really don't know what you have. A typical tortilla in the states is
    > either corn or flour. If the tortilla is corn, immersing it and
    > passing it rather quickly through hot oil will make it pliable enough
    > to fold it for tacos or roll it for other preparations. The typical
    > corn tortilla is around seven inches in diameter and about 1/8 inch
    > thick where I live.


    So they are less tender than flour ones, I gather

    > Flour tortillas are far more pliable when bought.
    > They can be steamed just a bit and then can be rolled and folded with
    > filling and will be as large or much larger in diameter than corn
    > tortillas.


    So flour tortillas don't usually get fried, am I correct?

    > The more that corn tortillas are fried, the more unforgiving they get.
    > Both tortillas can be used as a wrap, but both are completely
    > different in preparation. I'm sure I've left crucial stuff out, but
    > the group will fill it in.


    Thansk for the info
    --
    Firma predefinita



  5. #25
    Nicole Massey Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas


    "ViLco" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:k4mfv0$sn0$[email protected]..
    > Leonard Blaisdell wrote:
    >
    >> I really don't know what you have. A typical tortilla in the states is
    >> either corn or flour. If the tortilla is corn, immersing it and
    >> passing it rather quickly through hot oil will make it pliable enough
    >> to fold it for tacos or roll it for other preparations. The typical
    >> corn tortilla is around seven inches in diameter and about 1/8 inch
    >> thick where I live.

    >
    > So they are less tender than flour ones, I gather


    Yes, flour tortillas are softer and more pliable, though also thought of as
    far less authentic. Also, there are some things that only corn tortillas
    will do. For example, it's very very rare to find enchiladas made with flour
    tortillas. Conversely, flour tortillas are the most common type used in
    making quesadillas.
    >> Flour tortillas are far more pliable when bought.
    >> They can be steamed just a bit and then can be rolled and folded with
    >> filling and will be as large or much larger in diameter than corn
    >> tortillas.

    >
    > So flour tortillas don't usually get fried, am I correct?


    Correct. You sometimes encounter them in baking, but their most common use
    is as a wrapper for soft tacos (though some regions of mexico use corn
    tortillas for this) and burritos, and also in fajitas. Both are also used as
    a table bread and buttered, dipped in hot sauce or salsa, and used to dip in
    chili con queso.



  6. #26
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas


    "ViLco" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:k4mfrr$s6r$[email protected]..
    > Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    >> What are they made of? I don't think we get them here.

    >
    > Wheat. So this Uncle Ben's brand has a line of mexican products which they
    > sell only in Europe? Do they sell just rice in the US? The marvels of
    > nowadays market


    Very interesting! AFAIK they only sell rice here but they are not a brand
    that I normally buy. So I don't really know what all they have. I do buy a
    lot of Mexican food though so if they had anything along those lines I would
    have seen it and I have not. I would be willing to bet that it is not
    authentic Mexican food.



  7. #27
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas


    "ViLco" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:k4mfv0$sn0$[email protected]..
    > Leonard Blaisdell wrote:
    >
    >> I really don't know what you have. A typical tortilla in the states is
    >> either corn or flour. If the tortilla is corn, immersing it and
    >> passing it rather quickly through hot oil will make it pliable enough
    >> to fold it for tacos or roll it for other preparations. The typical
    >> corn tortilla is around seven inches in diameter and about 1/8 inch
    >> thick where I live.

    >
    > So they are less tender than flour ones, I gather
    >
    >> Flour tortillas are far more pliable when bought.
    >> They can be steamed just a bit and then can be rolled and folded with
    >> filling and will be as large or much larger in diameter than corn
    >> tortillas.

    >
    > So flour tortillas don't usually get fried, am I correct?
    >
    >> The more that corn tortillas are fried, the more unforgiving they get.
    >> Both tortillas can be used as a wrap, but both are completely
    >> different in preparation. I'm sure I've left crucial stuff out, but
    >> the group will fill it in.

    >
    > Thansk for the info


    Large flour tortillas are frequently fried as a shell for taco salads (not
    authentic Mexican food) or chalupas which is sort of like a large taco but
    eaten with a fork. Recently I saw a soft chalupa offered on a menu. I was
    told that it is the same. Just not fried. Taquitos or Flautas are a rolled
    taco with only meat or meat and cheese as a filling. Used to be that
    Taquitos used a corn tortilla and Flautas used flour but these days you
    never know. These are usually fried but sometimes baked. Then there is the
    Chimichanga. I don't know exactly what this is because I had one once and
    disliked it. Sort of like a burrito I guess but fried. Then there is a
    dessert that is made using triangles of flour tortillas, fried. Usually
    then dipped in cinnamon and sugar. Sometimes drizzled with corn syrup,
    strawberry syrup or honey. Sometimes topped with berries, cooked cinnamon
    apples, ice cream and/or whipped cream. Often called sopapillas but a real
    sopapilla is actually a soft bun that you poke a hole in and fill with honey
    at the table. Also called Crustos and other names.



  8. #28
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas

    On Fri, 5 Oct 2012 13:21:31 +0200, ViLco wrote:

    > Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    >> What are they made of? I don't think we get them here.

    >
    > Wheat. So this Uncle Ben's brand has a line of mexican products which they
    > sell only in Europe? Do they sell just rice in the US? The marvels of
    > nowadays market


    Yes, they only sell rice and rice mixes here in the U.S. No wheat
    products that I've ever seen. Nor anything Mexican, for sure.

    It looks like Uncle Ben's sells Indian curries and chili mixes in the
    UK, noodles, Thai curries, and oriental sauces in Germany, but I can't
    find an Italian site.

    -sw

  9. #29
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas

    On Fri, 5 Oct 2012 09:46:12 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Fri, 5 Oct 2012 13:21:31 +0200, ViLco wrote:
    >
    >> Julie Bove wrote:
    >>
    >>> What are they made of? I don't think we get them here.

    >>
    >> Wheat. So this Uncle Ben's brand has a line of mexican products which they
    >> sell only in Europe? Do they sell just rice in the US? The marvels of
    >> nowadays market

    >
    >Yes, they only sell rice and rice mixes here in the U.S. No wheat
    >products that I've ever seen. Nor anything Mexican, for sure.
    >
    >It looks like Uncle Ben's sells Indian curries and chili mixes in the
    >UK, noodles, Thai curries, and oriental sauces in Germany, but I can't
    >find an Italian site.


    That's because Italian is no more a cusine than European.

    Uncle Bens does sell Tex-Mex style products in the UK, scroll to the
    very bottom of the page to click on area of choice, then click on
    products:
    http://www.unclebens.com/
    http://www.unclebens.co.uk/our-products

  10. #30
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas

    ViLco wrote:
    >
    > Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    > >>> UNcle Ben's Tortillas? That kinda funny. A White guy's name on a
    > >>> brand of tortillas. Only in Italy, I guess!

    >
    > >> I thought old unk Ben was black.

    >
    > > He is!

    >
    > Yes, and here is the logo on their italian stuff:
    > http://www.mysavings.com/img/link/large/5400.jpg


    That's Obama in 20 years.

  11. #31
    Nicole Massey Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas


    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:k4mqjd$vhn$[email protected]..
    >
    > "ViLco" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:k4mfv0$sn0$[email protected]..
    >> Leonard Blaisdell wrote:
    >>
    >>> I really don't know what you have. A typical tortilla in the states is
    >>> either corn or flour. If the tortilla is corn, immersing it and
    >>> passing it rather quickly through hot oil will make it pliable enough
    >>> to fold it for tacos or roll it for other preparations. The typical
    >>> corn tortilla is around seven inches in diameter and about 1/8 inch
    >>> thick where I live.

    >>
    >> So they are less tender than flour ones, I gather
    >>
    >>> Flour tortillas are far more pliable when bought.
    >>> They can be steamed just a bit and then can be rolled and folded with
    >>> filling and will be as large or much larger in diameter than corn
    >>> tortillas.

    >>
    >> So flour tortillas don't usually get fried, am I correct?
    >>
    >>> The more that corn tortillas are fried, the more unforgiving they get.
    >>> Both tortillas can be used as a wrap, but both are completely
    >>> different in preparation. I'm sure I've left crucial stuff out, but
    >>> the group will fill it in.

    >>
    >> Thansk for the info

    >
    > Large flour tortillas are frequently fried as a shell for taco salads (not
    > authentic Mexican food) or chalupas which is sort of like a large taco but
    > eaten with a fork. Recently I saw a soft chalupa offered on a menu. I
    > was told that it is the same. Just not fried. Taquitos or Flautas are a
    > rolled taco with only meat or meat and cheese as a filling. Used to be
    > that Taquitos used a corn tortilla and Flautas used flour but these days
    > you never know. These are usually fried but sometimes baked. Then there
    > is the Chimichanga. I don't know exactly what this is because I had one
    > once and disliked it. Sort of like a burrito I guess but fried. Then
    > there is a dessert that is made using triangles of flour tortillas, fried.
    > Usually then dipped in cinnamon and sugar. Sometimes drizzled with corn
    > syrup, strawberry syrup or honey. Sometimes topped with berries, cooked
    > cinnamon apples, ice cream and/or whipped cream. Often called sopapillas
    > but a real sopapilla is actually a soft bun that you poke a hole in and
    > fill with honey at the table. Also called Crustos and other names.


    You got the chimichangaa correct -- it's a deep fried burrito. They harken
    from Arizona, from what I've been told, so like Nachos, taco salads,
    fajitas, burritos, and quesadillas they're not authentic mexican food.



  12. #32
    gregz Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas

    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Chemo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > On Oct 2, 9:23 am, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    >> On Tue, 2 Oct 2012 13:07:41 +0200, ViLco wrote:
    >>> I got a package recently and they worked out pretty good, I filled them
    >>> with
    >>> a chicken and onion filling and baked then in the oven, the tortillas
    >>> got a
    >>> very nice friable and soft texture.
    >>> I've read that someone fries them, is this done in a little oil or is it
    >>> deep fried? Those who fry tortillas, do they do that after filling them
    >>> or
    >>> before using them some way?
    >>> Thanks in advance

    >>
    >> UNcle Ben's Tortillas? That kinda funny. A White guy's name on a
    >> brand of tortillas. Only in Italy, I guess!
    >>
    >> Are they corn or flour?
    >>
    >> -sw

    >
    > I thought old unk Ben was black.
    >
    > He is!


    What the hell is converted rice ?

    Greg

  13. #33
    Leonard Blaisdell Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas

    In article <k4mfv0$sn0$[email protected]>, "ViLco" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > > Flour tortillas are far more pliable when bought.
    > > They can be steamed just a bit and then can be rolled and folded with
    > > filling and will be as large or much larger in diameter than corn
    > > tortillas.

    >
    > So flour tortillas don't usually get fried, am I correct?


    Let me rethink/rephrase this. Flour tortillas are definitely more
    pliable. Flour tortillas (where I live) can be put individually in a pan
    that will hold them on medium heat and pressed with your fingers until
    it's warm to your fingers, flipped and held for the same amount of time.
    The time is short and makes them more pliable. Flour tortillas soften
    with dry heat. Don't use oil in the pan.
    Then you can pretty much make bulky origami from them. Steaming is not
    necessary (where I live). I'm sorry I mentioned it. Once you have
    heated, put filling in the center and wrapped, folding the ends inside,
    or rolled them, you can do pretty much what you want with them with a
    no-water method. You can bake the flour tortilla bundle or wrap, or you
    can fry it if you have folded the ends in. You can put cheese, olives,
    onions or whatever you want on a baked one before baking. Or you can
    simply use one as a wrap for vegetables.
    Both flour and corn tortillas (where I live) use precooked ingredients
    inside them before final heating in preparation for serving.
    I don't think you can fold in the ends of a corn tortilla. That's where
    tamales show up, and they're completely different.
    With flour tortillas, think of stuffing pita, only wrap it.

    leo

  14. #34
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas

    gregz wrote:
    > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> "Chemo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >> On Oct 2, 9:23 am, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    >>> On Tue, 2 Oct 2012 13:07:41 +0200, ViLco wrote:
    >>>> I got a package recently and they worked out pretty good, I filled them
    >>>> with
    >>>> a chicken and onion filling and baked then in the oven, the tortillas
    >>>> got a
    >>>> very nice friable and soft texture.
    >>>> I've read that someone fries them, is this done in a little oil or is it
    >>>> deep fried? Those who fry tortillas, do they do that after filling them
    >>>> or
    >>>> before using them some way?
    >>>> Thanks in advance
    >>> UNcle Ben's Tortillas? That kinda funny. A White guy's name on a
    >>> brand of tortillas. Only in Italy, I guess!
    >>>
    >>> Are they corn or flour?
    >>>
    >>> -sw

    >> I thought old unk Ben was black.
    >>
    >> He is!

    >
    > What the hell is converted rice ?
    >
    > Greg


    You are in luck (or maybe not). A while ago, I typed this
    information that was in one of the Uncle Ben booklets, just to
    preserve the information:

    Here is the process used for "Converted Rice":

    1. The rice is cleaned.
    2. It is vacuumed “to pull microscopic air bubbles out of the
    rice grain.”
    3. It is steeped under pressure “to dissolve water-soluble B
    vitamins and other whole-grain properties from bran, hull and germ
    and force them into the rice grain itself.”
    4. It is steamed “to seal the water-soluble B vitamins and other
    whole-grain properties in the rice grain.”
    5. It is vacuumed and dry heated “to remove moisture, harden
    outer surface of grain.”
    6. It is milled and polished and “ready to go into the package.”

    --
    Jean B.

  15. #35
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas

    On Sat, 06 Oct 2012 23:52:05 -0400, Jean B. wrote:

    > gregz wrote:
    >> "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> "Chemo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]..
    >>> On Oct 2, 9:23 am, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    >>>> On Tue, 2 Oct 2012 13:07:41 +0200, ViLco wrote:
    >>>>> I got a package recently and they worked out pretty good, I filled them
    >>>>> with
    >>>>> a chicken and onion filling and baked then in the oven, the tortillas
    >>>>> got a
    >>>>> very nice friable and soft texture.
    >>>>> I've read that someone fries them, is this done in a little oil or is it
    >>>>> deep fried? Those who fry tortillas, do they do that after filling them
    >>>>> or
    >>>>> before using them some way?
    >>>>> Thanks in advance
    >>>> UNcle Ben's Tortillas? That kinda funny. A White guy's name on a
    >>>> brand of tortillas. Only in Italy, I guess!
    >>>>
    >>>> Are they corn or flour?
    >>>>
    >>>> -sw
    >>> I thought old unk Ben was black.
    >>>
    >>> He is!

    >>
    >> What the hell is converted rice ?
    >>
    >> Greg

    >
    > You are in luck (or maybe not). A while ago, I typed this
    > information that was in one of the Uncle Ben booklets, just to
    > preserve the information:
    >
    > Here is the process used for "Converted Rice":
    >
    > 1. The rice is cleaned.
    > 2. It is vacuumed to pull microscopic air bubbles out of the
    > rice grain.
    > 3. It is steeped under pressure to dissolve water-soluble B
    > vitamins and other whole-grain properties from bran, hull and germ
    > and force them into the rice grain itself.
    > 4. It is steamed to seal the water-soluble B vitamins and other
    > whole-grain properties in the rice grain.
    > 5. It is vacuumed and dry heated to remove moisture, harden
    > outer surface of grain.
    > 6. It is milled and polished and ready to go into the package.


    That must have been a while ago you snarfed that description!

    You'd never see that method described any more. As gobbleygook as it
    sounds, it's probably one of the more least-processed(*) methods in
    the "middle aisles" these days.

    I'm going to buy some Default Uncle Ben's tomorrow just for kicks.
    Come to think of it, Gary's going to the grocery store in a few hours
    so pick me up some! :-)

    -sw

  16. #36
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas

    Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    > I'm going to buy some Default Uncle Ben's tomorrow just for kicks.
    > Come to think of it, Gary's going to the grocery store in a few hours
    > so pick me up some! :-)
    >
    > -sw


    Oh all right, Steve.
    LOL! You remembered, eh? :-D

    Note: this is why one should never tell lies on a Usenet group. You tend to
    forget what you lied about eventually and someone will call you on it later.
    If you stick to the truth, you won't forget because you really did do that.

    I laughed a short while back when Barbara said something like she would
    never dream of grocery shopping at 6am. For you Barbara - if you ever wake
    up at 3:15am some Saturday morning, think of me....I'll be at the grocery
    store doing my weekly shopping (on the East Coast). heheh It's the
    "traditional" grocery shopping time for me. And btw, if you ever need boxes
    for moving or whatever, that time is good. Often the stockers are still
    working and many empty boxes in the isles, free for the asking/taking.

    Finally, to repond to another thread about going to many stores for
    sales.... I rarely do that but I did do it yesterday. One nearby store was
    selling Angel Soft tp for only $4.99 for 24-rolls (or 12 double rolls).
    Normally, I check my regular store (Farm Fresh) and they have the same or
    similar sales. If I'm only saving pennies, I'll pay extra to get all from
    the one store. This time my store was selling them for $8.99.

    So I got home from regular shopping, then went out to buy gas for my van and
    nearby was the other store where I saved $4.00 on the large package of tp.
    Both the gas station and the Food Lion open at 7am.

    G.

    PS - one nice thing about living in a populated area. Within a mile radius
    of my house, I have 3 normal grocery stores and one health food store (where
    I buy fresh dried spices and bulk grains). Expand that radius to 2.5 miles
    from my house and I have 7 normal grocery stores, 4 specialty grocery stores
    (health food store, Fresh Market, TJ's, Whole Foods), and still a few more
    very small specialty stores. One for olive oil only and one that specializes
    in cheese and wine. Also 2 nice pet stores in that radius for pet food.

  17. #37
    sf Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas

    On Sun, 07 Oct 2012 06:14:34 -0400, Gary <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I laughed a short while back when Barbara said something like she would
    > never dream of grocery shopping at 6am. For you Barbara - if you ever wake
    > up at 3:15am some Saturday morning, think of me....I'll be at the grocery
    > store doing my weekly shopping (on the East Coast). heheh It's the
    > "traditional" grocery shopping time for me. And btw, if you ever need boxes
    > for moving or whatever, that time is good. Often the stockers are still
    > working and many empty boxes in the isles, free for the asking/taking.


    Back when I used to drive the kids to school and they had to be there
    by 7:30AM, I'd be grocery shopping by 8 (Price Club used to open at 8
    too, which was really nice - Costco doesn't). Grocery shopping alone
    just isn't enough incentive to drag my sorry a** out of bed at the
    crack of dawn.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  18. #38
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas

    sf wrote:
    >
    > Grocery shopping alone
    > just isn't enough incentive to drag my sorry a** out of bed at the
    > crack of dawn.


    I get up no later than 4:30am each morning and even a bit earlier on days
    off. I love a store that opens by 6am I'm really annoyed with stores that
    wait until 9-10 to open. Walmart rules because they are open 24/7 here.

    G.

  19. #39
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Sat, 06 Oct 2012 23:52:05 -0400, Jean B. wrote:
    >
    >> gregz wrote:
    >>> "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>> "Chemo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>> news:e176000d-447b-4a2c-9f10-77[email protected]..
    >>>> On Oct 2, 9:23 am, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    >>>>> On Tue, 2 Oct 2012 13:07:41 +0200, ViLco wrote:
    >>>>>> I got a package recently and they worked out pretty good, I filled them
    >>>>>> with
    >>>>>> a chicken and onion filling and baked then in the oven, the tortillas
    >>>>>> got a
    >>>>>> very nice friable and soft texture.
    >>>>>> I've read that someone fries them, is this done in a little oil or is it
    >>>>>> deep fried? Those who fry tortillas, do they do that after filling them
    >>>>>> or
    >>>>>> before using them some way?
    >>>>>> Thanks in advance
    >>>>> UNcle Ben's Tortillas? That kinda funny. A White guy's name on a
    >>>>> brand of tortillas. Only in Italy, I guess!
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Are they corn or flour?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> -sw
    >>>> I thought old unk Ben was black.
    >>>>
    >>>> He is!
    >>> What the hell is converted rice ?
    >>>
    >>> Greg

    >> You are in luck (or maybe not). A while ago, I typed this
    >> information that was in one of the Uncle Ben booklets, just to
    >> preserve the information:
    >>
    >> Here is the process used for "Converted Rice":
    >>
    >> 1. The rice is cleaned.
    >> 2. It is vacuumed to pull microscopic air bubbles out of the
    >> rice grain.
    >> 3. It is steeped under pressure to dissolve water-soluble B
    >> vitamins and other whole-grain properties from bran, hull and germ
    >> and force them into the rice grain itself.
    >> 4. It is steamed to seal the water-soluble B vitamins and other
    >> whole-grain properties in the rice grain.
    >> 5. It is vacuumed and dry heated to remove moisture, harden
    >> outer surface of grain.
    >> 6. It is milled and polished and ready to go into the package.

    >
    > That must have been a while ago you snarfed that description!
    >
    > You'd never see that method described any more. As gobbleygook as it
    > sounds, it's probably one of the more least-processed(*) methods in
    > the "middle aisles" these days.
    >
    > I'm going to buy some Default Uncle Ben's tomorrow just for kicks.
    > Come to think of it, Gary's going to the grocery store in a few hours
    > so pick me up some! :-)
    >
    > -sw


    That booklet wasn't ultra-old. I am going trying to capture
    points of interest as I sort through my ephemera, and I thought
    that might be interesting to someone.

    My mother used Uncle Ben's rice. There obviously weren't so many
    offerings back then--speaking of the 50s and 60s. The only other
    rice that I was aware of was Minute Rice, which I am happy to say
    Mom didn't cook. I must haver experienced at some friend's house.
    Ugh.

    Now, of course, we have access to many more rices, and we know
    that Uncle Ben's is just not appropriate in many contexts... and
    that there are better choices for every context.

    --

  20. #40
    sf Guest

    Default Re: uncle ben's tortillas

    On Sun, 07 Oct 2012 09:41:53 -0400, Gary <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf wrote:
    > >
    > > Grocery shopping alone
    > > just isn't enough incentive to drag my sorry a** out of bed at the
    > > crack of dawn.

    >
    > I get up no later than 4:30am each morning and even a bit earlier on days
    > off. I love a store that opens by 6am I'm really annoyed with stores that
    > wait until 9-10 to open. Walmart rules because they are open 24/7 here.


    I probably should have emphasized that if you ever catch me shopping
    at 3 or 4 in the morning, it will be because I haven't gone to bed yet
    - not because I got up early. From that, you can extrapolate that I'm
    not much of a fisherman either. If fish aren't biting at the crack of
    noon, they're safe from me.


    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

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