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Thread: Tzatziki

  1. #1
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Tzatziki

    Instead of using Greek yogurt and trying to squeeze the juice out of
    the cucumbers, could you just use regular plain yogurt and
    dehydrated cucumbers? The cukes should absorb moisture from the
    yogurt and thicken it. What am I missing?

    Whole milk yogurt, or lowfat, or fat-free?

    Bob

  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki

    On Mon, 16 Aug 2010 00:11:13 -0500, zxcvbob <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Instead of using Greek yogurt and trying to squeeze the juice out of
    > the cucumbers, could you just use regular plain yogurt and
    > dehydrated cucumbers? The cukes should absorb moisture from the
    > yogurt and thicken it. What am I missing?
    >
    > Whole milk yogurt, or lowfat, or fat-free?
    >

    Why not just use regular yogurt and regular cucumbers? If you need to
    tighten up the yogurt, drain it overnight in a strainer. The amount
    of fat in the yogurt is up to you.


    --

    Carrot cake counts as a serving of vegetables.

  3. #3
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki


    "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio

    > Instead of using Greek yogurt and trying to squeeze the juice out of > the
    > cucumbers, could you just use regular plain yogurt and > dehydrated
    > cucumbers? The cukes should absorb moisture from the > yogurt and thicken
    > it. What am I missing?
    >
    > Whole milk yogurt, or lowfat, or fat-free?


    Maybe I am missing why it should be thick? I've never had it thick at home,
    in restaurants nor in Greece. I use normal cucumbers and non-fat plain
    yogurt.



  4. #4
    Gorio Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki


    'sf[_9_ Wrote:
    > ;1519219']On Mon, 16 Aug 2010 00:11:13 -0500, zxcvbob
    > [email protected]
    > wrote:
    > -
    > Instead of using Greek yogurt and trying to squeeze the juice out of
    > the cucumbers, could you just use regular plain yogurt and
    > dehydrated cucumbers? The cukes should absorb moisture from the
    > yogurt and thicken it. What am I missing?
    >
    > Whole milk yogurt, or lowfat, or fat-free?
    > -
    > Why not just use regular yogurt and regular cucumbers? If you need to
    > tighten up the yogurt, drain it overnight in a strainer. The amount
    > of fat in the yogurt is up to you.
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Carrot cake counts as a serving of vegetables.


    Good pointer. Be careful, though. I've had some that had become overly
    "tight" and it was like a clump. I like my ziki more fluid than hard.
    Nothing gets my goat more than getting a perfect gyros and then opening
    the tzatziki to find a hard lump. Viscosity means a lot to this sauce.




    --
    Gorio

  5. #5
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki

    Giusi wrote:
    > "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >
    >> Instead of using Greek yogurt and trying to squeeze the juice out of > the
    >> cucumbers, could you just use regular plain yogurt and > dehydrated
    >> cucumbers? The cukes should absorb moisture from the > yogurt and thicken
    >> it. What am I missing?
    >>
    >> Whole milk yogurt, or lowfat, or fat-free?

    >
    > Maybe I am missing why it should be thick? I've never had it thick at home,
    > in restaurants nor in Greece. I use normal cucumbers and non-fat plain
    > yogurt.


    It's okay with undrained and finely chopped cucumber if you use it up
    right away, but it doesn't keep. It turns mushy within hours. I grate
    the cucumber into a sieve and drain it when I make tzatziki. I use a
    nice thick Balkan style regular fat yoghurt. If you want to thicken
    tzitzki you can add sour cream.

  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki

    On Mon, 16 Aug 2010 10:06:31 -0400, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > It's okay with undrained and finely chopped cucumber if you use it up
    > right away, but it doesn't keep.


    Really! Can you imagine 3 day old tzatziki? It would be rotten
    vegetables in yogurt.

    --

    Carrot cake counts as a serving of vegetables.

  7. #7
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki

    On Aug 16, 5:03*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Mon, 16 Aug 2010 10:06:31 -0400, Dave Smith
    >
    > <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    > > It's okay with undrained and finely chopped cucumber if you use it up
    > > right away, but it doesn't keep.

    >
    > Really! *Can you imagine 3 day old tzatziki? *It would be rotten
    > vegetables in yogurt.


    If kept in the refrigerator, what would cause the vegetables to rot?

    I use whole-milk Greek yogurt and shredded cucumber. I don't
    make a ton, but it lasts easily a few days in the fridge. All it
    needs is a good stir to re-combine the whey back into the
    mixture.

    Granted, I only use it as a dressing on sandwiches. There's
    a restaurant here in town that uses a very thick (and somewhat
    bland, to my taste) tzatziki as a dipping sauce for chicken
    breast kebab.

    Dehydrated vegetables are just... eeww.

    Cindy Hamilton

  8. #8
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki

    Cindy Hamilton wrote:
    > On Aug 16, 5:03 pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    >> On Mon, 16 Aug 2010 10:06:31 -0400, Dave Smith
    >>
    >> <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    >>> It's okay with undrained and finely chopped cucumber if you use it up
    >>> right away, but it doesn't keep.

    >> Really! Can you imagine 3 day old tzatziki? It would be rotten
    >> vegetables in yogurt.

    >
    > If kept in the refrigerator, what would cause the vegetables to rot?


    The water gets sucked out of the cucumber and makes a sloppy mess.

    > I use whole-milk Greek yogurt and shredded cucumber.


    I use finely shredded cucumber and shred it into a sieve, sprinkle some
    salt on it. let it sit for about 15 minutes and press out as much water
    as I can.

  9. #9
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki

    On Aug 17, 11:35*am, Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    > Cindy Hamilton wrote:
    > > On Aug 16, 5:03 pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > >> On Mon, 16 Aug 2010 10:06:31 -0400, Dave Smith

    >
    > >> <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    > >>> It's okay with undrained and finely chopped cucumber if you use it up
    > >>> right away, but it doesn't keep.
    > >> Really! *Can you imagine 3 day old tzatziki? *It would be rotten
    > >> vegetables in yogurt.

    >
    > > If kept in the refrigerator, what would cause the vegetables to rot?

    >
    > The water gets sucked out of the cucumber and makes a sloppy mess.


    Granted, but that's not "rot".

    > > I use whole-milk Greek yogurt and shredded cucumber.

    >
    > I use finely shredded cucumber and shred it into a sieve, sprinkle some
    > salt on it. let it sit for about 15 minutes and press out as much water
    > as I can.


    We don't mind it being a little thin. Tastes vary.

    Cindy Hamilton

  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki

    On Tue, 17 Aug 2010 07:51:11 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >If kept in the refrigerator, what would cause the vegetables to rot?


    You may not think you're eating rotting cucumbers, but you are. Make
    it and eat it, don't keep it.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki

    On Tue, 17 Aug 2010 10:24:08 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Granted, but that's not "rot".


    It will be in a state of decomposition, which is also called rot.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  12. #12
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki

    On Aug 17, 3:19*pm, sf <sf.use...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Tue, 17 Aug 2010 10:24:08 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
    >
    > <angelicapagane...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > >Granted, but that's not "rot".

    >
    > It will be in a state of decomposition, which is also called rot.


    What is causing the decomposition? Bacteria?

    Cindy Hamilton

  13. #13
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki

    Cindy Hamilton wrote:
    > On Aug 17, 3:19 pm, sf <sf.use...@geemail.com> wrote:
    >> On Tue, 17 Aug 2010 10:24:08 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
    >>
    >> <angelicapagane...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >>> Granted, but that's not "rot".

    >> It will be in a state of decomposition, which is also called rot.

    >
    > What is causing the decomposition? Bacteria?


    I don't know if the cucumber rotted or if it was just the water that
    made the tzatiki so sloppy and disgusting. IMO, it didn't taste as good,
    but it it does keep better for a day or two if the finely grated
    cucumber has been drained.

  14. #14
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki

    On Tue, 17 Aug 2010 13:55:16 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Aug 17, 3:19*pm, sf <sf.use...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > > On Tue, 17 Aug 2010 10:24:08 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
    > >
    > > <angelicapagane...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > > >Granted, but that's not "rot".

    > >
    > > It will be in a state of decomposition, which is also called rot.

    >
    > What is causing the decomposition? Bacteria?
    >


    http://www.ehow.com/how-does_4574259...decompose.html
    Refrigeration slows, but doesn't stop rotting and the smaller your
    food particles (such as grated cucumber) the faster it decomposes.
    Why do you think it gets "watery"? Your cucumbers are
    decomposing/rotting/turning to mush.

    --

    Carrot cake counts as a serving of vegetables.

  15. #15
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki

    sf wrote:

    >
    > http://www.ehow.com/how-does_4574259...decompose.html
    > Refrigeration slows, but doesn't stop rotting and the smaller your
    > food particles (such as grated cucumber) the faster it decomposes.
    > Why do you think it gets "watery"? Your cucumbers are
    > decomposing/rotting/turning to mush.



    Most of the water is likely because of the water in the cucumber, and
    there is a lot of it in cucumber. I never used to drain tzatziki and
    always made just enough for a meal or trashed any leftover because itgot
    watery and unpleasant. Then I learned about grating and draining the
    cucumber, and it definitely keeps a little longer.

  16. #16
    Jinx Minx Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki


    "Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    newsAFao.8264$[email protected]..
    > sf wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> http://www.ehow.com/how-does_4574259...decompose.html
    >> Refrigeration slows, but doesn't stop rotting and the smaller your
    >> food particles (such as grated cucumber) the faster it decomposes.
    >> Why do you think it gets "watery"? Your cucumbers are
    >> decomposing/rotting/turning to mush.

    >
    >
    > Most of the water is likely because of the water in the cucumber, and
    > there is a lot of it in cucumber. I never used to drain tzatziki and
    > always made just enough for a meal or trashed any leftover because itgot
    > watery and unpleasant. Then I learned about grating and draining the
    > cucumber, and it definitely keeps a little longer.


    I salt my cucumber and let it drain too (and compress with towels before
    adding to the yogurt), and since adding that to my process I've never had
    watery, icky tzatziki again. It keeps just fine in the fridge for a couple
    days. I love the stuff!

    Jinx



  17. #17
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki

    zxcvbob wrote on Mon, 16 Aug 2010 00:11:13 -0500:

    >Instead of using Greek yogurt and trying to squeeze the juice out of

    the cucumbers, could you just use regular plain yogurt and
    dehydrated cucumbers? The cukes should absorb moisture from the
    >yogurt and thicken it. What am I missing?


    > Whole milk yogurt, or lowfat, or fat-free?


    I've never seen dehydrated cucumbers. Where do you find them?

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

  18. #18
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki

    On 8/17/2010 11:53 PM, James Silverton wrote:
    > zxcvbob wrote on Mon, 16 Aug 2010 00:11:13 -0500:
    >
    >> Instead of using Greek yogurt and trying to squeeze the juice out of

    > the cucumbers, could you just use regular plain yogurt and dehydrated
    > cucumbers? The cukes should absorb moisture from the
    >> yogurt and thicken it. What am I missing?

    >
    >> Whole milk yogurt, or lowfat, or fat-free?

    >
    > I've never seen dehydrated cucumbers. Where do you find them?
    >



    I have a dehydrator. I can dehydrate the cuke until they are leathery
    but not crisp, and they should plump back up (not completely) when mixed
    with the yogurt.

    Dehydrated tomatoes work a lot better than fresh in vegetable soup
    because they don't fall apart.

    Bob

  19. #19
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki

    On Tue 17 Aug 2010 10:18:19p, zxcvbob told us...

    > I have a dehydrator. I can dehydrate the cuke until they are
    > leathery but not crisp, and they should plump back up (not
    > completely) when mixed with the yogurt.


    I haven' tried it, of course, but I doubt that I'd like the dried
    cucumbers. I slice and salt the cucumbers and allow to sit in a
    colander for an hour or so, then rinse well and blot dry. They don't
    need to be squeezed. Depending on the intended use, I mix with whole
    milk yogurt or full-fat sour cream. With the sour cream I add a bit of
    vinegar.

    > Dehydrated tomatoes work a lot better than fresh in vegetable soup
    > because they don't fall apart.


    When I put tomatoes in soup, I *want* them to fall apart. :-)

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  20. #20
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: Tzatziki

    On Aug 17, 6:28*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Tue, 17 Aug 2010 13:55:16 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
    >
    > <angelicapagane...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > > On Aug 17, 3:19*pm, sf *<sf.use...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > > > On Tue, 17 Aug 2010 10:24:08 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton

    >
    > > > <angelicapagane...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > > > >Granted, but that's not "rot".

    >
    > > > It will be in a state of decomposition, which is also called rot.

    >
    > > What is causing the decomposition? *Bacteria?

    >
    > http://www.ehow.com/how-does_4574259...decompose.html
    > Refrigeration slows, but doesn't stop rotting and the smaller your
    > food particles (such as grated cucumber) the faster it decomposes.
    > Why do you think it gets "watery"? *Your cucumbers are
    > decomposing/rotting/turning to mush.


    It gets watery because grating and salting destroys cell walls,
    releasing the water in the cucumber.

    For that matter, the whey in the yogurt will separate, too.
    When I take a few spoonsful out to make tzatziki, the next
    time I come back some whey has collected in the depression
    formed by the spoon.

    Sure, it's an esthetic issue to have runny tzatziki, but it's not
    rotten after two or three days in the fridge. Especially since
    the pH of yogurt (and friendly active cultures) suppress
    undesirable bacteria.

    What about salsa? Does it rot after a few days in the fridge?
    How about homemade ranch dressing (herbs and garlic in
    buttermilk)?

    Cindy Hamilton

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