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Thread: Turnip Greens question

  1. #21
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Turnip Greens question

    Jill wrote:

    >> On exception I recently ran into. I have some collards that are
    >> bolting,

    >
    > I have no idea what "bolting" means.


    It has two meanings which you need to know: First, it refers to the
    specific stage in a plant's growth when it starts producing seeds.
    Second, it describes what John does whenever you mention money.

    Bob

  2. #22
    Bob123 Guest

    Default Re: Turnip Greens question

    On Mar 16, 9:41 am, "jmcquown" <j_mcqu...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > "Bob123" <Bob...@netzero.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Mar 15, 1:38 pm, "jmcquown" <j_mcqu...@comcast.net> wrote:

    >
    > >> I would have said add a smoked ham hock or a couple of smoked turkey
    > >> wings.
    > >> Add some white vinegar or lemon juice Simmer low and slow. This is
    > >> the
    > >> old south (USian) style method. Cook until the greens are nice and
    > >> tender,
    > >> about an hour.

    >
    > >> Jill

    >
    > > Well, that sounds like good advice. However, in my experience, ten
    > > minutes in a rolling boil has always been enough for greens by
    > > themselves. I usually just fish out the biggest piece of stem I can
    > > find, and see if it is nice and mushy tender. If not , a couple more
    > > ninutes will always do it. I am guessing your "one hour" is for the
    > > meat you add, and that sounds right to me.

    >
    > Actually, smoked ham hocks or smoked turkey wings are already cooked. No, I
    > said low and slow because boiling greens isn't something I'd do. I don't
    > want them to cook in 10 minutes. I want them to cook down until tender.
    > Time to develop that "pot likker" which results from long slow cooking.
    >
    > > On exception I recently ran into. I have some collards that are
    > > bolting,

    >
    > I have no idea what "bolting" means.
    >
    > Jill


    Jill, collards, and turnip greens just grow, get bigger and bigger,
    and then almost overnight a big stalk comes up in the center
    and shoots skyward. It grows very fast, and in a week the "bolt"
    will be maybe 5 or 6 feet high, sticking up from the center of the
    leaf bunch and heading skyward. Then, near the top of the bolt,
    yellow flowers form. That turns into seeds, or seed pods.
    In collards, it is pods that have seeds in them about the size
    of a BB. My turnips haven't seeded yet, and this is the first time
    I've gone thru this with turnip greens, so I'm not sure how the
    seeds are presented. But I'll know in a week or two.

  3. #23
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Turnip Greens question

    jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I have no idea what "bolting" means.
    >
    > Jill


    Basically it means going to seed.



  4. #24
    RussianFoodDire Guest

    Default Re: Turnip Greens question


    I would never prefer online cookbooks. Cut off the bottom of the
    stalks, then cut the top into florets.Then chop the stems and steam
    them. It is the most simple way.




    --
    RussianFoodDire

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