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Thread: Turkey stock

  1. #1
    The Cook Guest

    Default Turkey stock

    What to do with it.

    I bought a fresh turkey breast this morning and stripped the meat from
    the bone. Did not try to get every last bit of meat off. Roasted the
    carcass, skin, onion, celery and carrot and the put them in a pot with
    water, salt and parsley. It looks and smells wonderful. It never did
    foam and it is very clear without me doing anything to it.

    Any suggestions about how to use it?

    BTW, I braised 1/2 of the meat and put the rest in the freezer. I am
    looking forward to some sandwiches with real turkey rather than
    getting deli stuff.
    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

  2. #2
    nobody but us chickens Guest

    Default Re: Turkey stock


    "The Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > What to do with it.
    >
    > I bought a fresh turkey breast this morning and stripped the meat from
    > the bone. Did not try to get every last bit of meat off. Roasted the
    > carcass, skin, onion, celery and carrot and the put them in a pot with
    > water, salt and parsley. It looks and smells wonderful. It never did
    > foam and it is very clear without me doing anything to it.
    >
    > Any suggestions about how to use it?
    >
    > BTW, I braised 1/2 of the meat and put the rest in the freezer. I am
    > looking forward to some sandwiches with real turkey rather than
    > getting deli stuff.
    > --
    > Susan N.
    >

    I rarely ever make the stock & soup the same weekend for some reason.
    After I cook the bones down until the meat falls off I strain it into a
    bowl,
    pick all the meat off the bones & add to the broth. I end up freezing it &
    when I ready I take all the fat off the top, cook with carrots, onions,
    celery & seasonings. I freeze extras in meal size containers & just cook
    noodles or rice to add in when we want turkey soup. We used up the last
    of 2007 turkey soup just a month or so ago & it was as good as the day
    I made it.



  3. #3
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Turkey stock

    The Cook wrote:
    >
    > What to do with it.
    >
    > I bought a fresh turkey breast this morning and stripped the meat from
    > the bone. Did not try to get every last bit of meat off. Roasted the
    > carcass, skin, onion, celery and carrot and the put them in a pot with
    > water, salt and parsley. It looks and smells wonderful. It never did
    > foam and it is very clear without me doing anything to it.
    >
    > Any suggestions about how to use it?


    Noodle soup with wide, floppy noodles. :-)

  4. #4
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Turkey stock


    "The Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > What to do with it.
    >
    > I bought a fresh turkey breast this morning and stripped the meat from
    > the bone. Did not try to get every last bit of meat off. Roasted the
    > carcass, skin, onion, celery and carrot and the put them in a pot with
    > water, salt and parsley. It looks and smells wonderful. It never did
    > foam and it is very clear without me doing anything to it.
    >
    > Any suggestions about how to use it?
    >


    Use it any place you'd use chicken stock. Cooking rice, making gravy, etc.
    Put some in the freezer if you have a lot.



  5. #5
    koko Guest

    Default Re: Turkey stock

    On Sat, 29 Nov 2008 15:41:46 -0500, The Cook <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >What to do with it.
    >
    >I bought a fresh turkey breast this morning and stripped the meat from
    >the bone. Did not try to get every last bit of meat off. Roasted the
    >carcass, skin, onion, celery and carrot and the put them in a pot with
    >water, salt and parsley. It looks and smells wonderful. It never did
    >foam and it is very clear without me doing anything to it.
    >
    >Any suggestions about how to use it?
    >
    >BTW, I braised 1/2 of the meat and put the rest in the freezer. I am
    >looking forward to some sandwiches with real turkey rather than
    >getting deli stuff.


    I especially like green beans cooked in stock. I cook my rice in stock
    instead of water, it sure makes a difference. A little stock added to
    mashed potatoes instead of milk is nice also.

    The stock I have from my turkey is sitting in the fridge. I'll skim
    the fat off and freeze the stock in plastic freezer bags in one cup
    increments, that way I will have some good home made stock on hand.

    koko
    There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    George Bernard Shaw
    www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    updated 11/27

  6. #6
    Joseph Littleshoes Guest

    Default Re: Turkey stock

    koko wrote:

    > On Sat, 29 Nov 2008 15:41:46 -0500, The Cook <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>What to do with it.
    >>
    >>I bought a fresh turkey breast this morning and stripped the meat from
    >>the bone. Did not try to get every last bit of meat off. Roasted the
    >>carcass, skin, onion, celery and carrot and the put them in a pot with
    >>water, salt and parsley. It looks and smells wonderful. It never did
    >>foam and it is very clear without me doing anything to it.
    >>
    >>Any suggestions about how to use it?
    >>
    >>BTW, I braised 1/2 of the meat and put the rest in the freezer. I am
    >>looking forward to some sandwiches with real turkey rather than
    >>getting deli stuff.

    >
    >
    > I especially like green beans cooked in stock. I cook my rice in stock
    > instead of water, it sure makes a difference. A little stock added to
    > mashed potatoes instead of milk is nice also.
    >
    > The stock I have from my turkey is sitting in the fridge. I'll skim
    > the fat off and freeze the stock in plastic freezer bags in one cup
    > increments, that way I will have some good home made stock on hand.
    >
    > koko



    Frozen stock always seems bland or other wise taste impaired to me,
    which is why i prefer to reduce as much as is possible and use the
    resulting concentrate that keeps well and long if kept air tight, rather
    than freeze a stock.
    --
    JL

  7. #7
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Turkey stock


    "The Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > What to do with it.
    >
    > I bought a fresh turkey breast this morning and stripped the meat from
    > the bone. Did not try to get every last bit of meat off. Roasted the
    > carcass, skin, onion, celery and carrot and the put them in a pot with
    > water, salt and parsley. It looks and smells wonderful. It never did
    > foam and it is very clear without me doing anything to it.
    >
    > Any suggestions about how to use it?


    Stock makes a wonderful base/liquid making for Rice.

    The rice will absorb all the flavor.


    Dimitri


  8. #8
    Theron Guest

    Default Re: Turkey stock


    "The Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > What to do with it.
    >
    > I bought a fresh turkey breast this morning and stripped the meat from
    > the bone. Did not try to get every last bit of meat off. Roasted the
    > carcass, skin, onion, celery and carrot and the put them in a pot with
    > water, salt and parsley. It looks and smells wonderful. It never did
    > foam and it is very clear without me doing anything to it.
    >
    > Any suggestions about how to use it?
    >
    > BTW, I braised 1/2 of the meat and put the rest in the freezer. I am
    > looking forward to some sandwiches with real turkey rather than
    > getting deli stuff.
    > --
    > Susan N.
    >
    >

    Freeze it and use it as the basis for your next turkey gravey. That changes
    the whole dish and brings it to a new level. I also use it to make stuffing,
    with the turkey liver and porcini mushrooms.

    Theron




  9. #9
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Turkey stock


    "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:35iYk.7172$[email protected]..
    >
    > "The Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> What to do with it.
    >>
    >> I bought a fresh turkey breast this morning and stripped the meat from
    >> the bone. Did not try to get every last bit of meat off. Roasted the
    >> carcass, skin, onion, celery and carrot and the put them in a pot with
    >> water, salt and parsley. It looks and smells wonderful. It never did
    >> foam and it is very clear without me doing anything to it.
    >>
    >> Any suggestions about how to use it?
    >>

    >
    > Use it any place you'd use chicken stock. Cooking rice, making gravy,
    > etc. Put some in the freezer if you have a lot.


    I made it following somebody's recipe last year, and somebody else was
    right--no matter how long you cook it, or what you put in it, it has a
    dishwater quality that chicken stock does not. I won't make it again.



  10. #10
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Turkey stock

    cybercat <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I made it following somebody's recipe last year, and somebody else was
    > right--no matter how long you cook it, or what you put in it, it has a
    > dishwater quality that chicken stock does not. I won't make it again.


    Turkey stock is almost as good as chicken stock. Who's recipe did
    you follow?

    -sw

  11. #11
    jay Guest

    Default Re: Turkey vs Chicken

    Sqwertz wrote:

    > Turkey cock is almost as good as chicken cock.


    > -sw aka the Colonel








  12. #12
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Turkey stock


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:291108.182144rfc1699.154[email protected]..
    > cybercat <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I made it following somebody's recipe last year, and somebody else was
    >> right--no matter how long you cook it, or what you put in it, it has a
    >> dishwater quality that chicken stock does not. I won't make it again.

    >
    > Turkey stock is almost as good as chicken stock. Who's recipe did
    > you follow?
    >


    I'm not talking to you until you get over your PMS.



  13. #13
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Turkey stock

    On Sat, 29 Nov 2008 18:21:44 -0600, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >cybercat <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I made it following somebody's recipe last year, and somebody else was
    >> right--no matter how long you cook it, or what you put in it, it has a
    >> dishwater quality that chicken stock does not. I won't make it again.

    >
    >Turkey stock is almost as good as chicken stock. Who's recipe did
    >you follow?
    >
    >-sw


    Wow, just tagging on, as I didn't see the post that was quoted.

    My turkey stock is very rich...and full of flavor.

    One way to do it, from Michael Ruhlman:
    http://blog.ruhlman.com/ruhlmancom/2...giving-th.html

    Another way, from his blog:
    "Roast a couple pounds of turkey wings, and any other inexpensive
    parts you may be able to gather, until they are golden brown and good
    enough to eat. Cover them with water and cook below a simmer for 6
    hours or so uncovered or in a 180-200 degree oven. For the last hour
    or two, add a large onion, 2 big carrots, two bay leaves, some
    peppercorns, thyme and parsley (if you have it on hand), and a couple
    tablespoons of tomato paste. Strain it through cloth and it's done."

    Christine

  14. #14
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Turkey vs Chicken

    jay <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >> Turkey cock is almost as good as chicken cock.

    >
    >> -sw aka the Colonel


    Jay's still mad because I turned him down.

    For those of you Not in The Know, 'Jay' was passionate towards me
    one night at an austin.food get-together at Iron Works. I turned
    him down gracefully and thanked him for the compliment. But he
    still harbors this grudge for some reason.

    That's why he's spouting cock, I guess.

    -sw

  15. #15
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Turkey stock

    cybercat <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> cybercat <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I made it following somebody's recipe last year, and somebody else was
    >>> right--no matter how long you cook it, or what you put in it, it has a
    >>> dishwater quality that chicken stock does not. I won't make it again.

    >>
    >> Turkey stock is almost as good as chicken stock. Who's recipe did
    >> you follow?

    >
    > I'm not talking to you until you get over your PMS.


    Damn, Gurl! This qualifies for the Book of Sauk (2008 ed.)!

    -sw

  16. #16
    maxine in ri Guest

    Default Re: Turkey stock

    On Nov 29, 3:41*pm, The Cook <susan_r23...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > What to do with it.
    >
    > I bought a fresh turkey breast this morning and stripped the meat from
    > the bone. *Did not try to get every last bit of meat off. *Roasted the
    > carcass, skin, onion, celery and carrot and the put them in a pot with
    > water, salt and parsley. *It looks and smells wonderful. *It never did
    > foam and it is very clear without me doing anything to it.
    >
    > Any suggestions about how to use it?
    >
    > BTW, I braised 1/2 of the meat and put the rest in the freezer. *I am
    > looking forward to some sandwiches with real turkey rather than
    > getting deli stuff.


    I usually use the whole carcass, especially the leg bones, wing tips,
    and pope's nose. Simmered for 2 hours with onion, garlic, and
    ginger. Use the resulting ambrosia anywhere that I would use chicken
    or vegetable stock.

    Great stuff to have around.

    maxine in ri

  17. #17
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Turkey stock

    In article <[email protected]>,
    The Cook <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What to do with it.
    >
    > I bought a fresh turkey breast this morning and stripped the meat from
    > the bone. Did not try to get every last bit of meat off. Roasted the
    > carcass, skin, onion, celery and carrot and the put them in a pot with
    > water, salt and parsley. It looks and smells wonderful. It never did
    > foam and it is very clear without me doing anything to it.
    >
    > Any suggestions about how to use it?


    Rice.

    I never cook rice with water. Only stock.
    It's good that way. ;-d

    >
    > BTW, I braised 1/2 of the meat and put the rest in the freezer. I am
    > looking forward to some sandwiches with real turkey rather than
    > getting deli stuff.

    --
    Peace! Om

    "Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them humanity cannot survive." -- Dalai Lama

  18. #18
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Turkey stock

    In article <[email protected]>,
    koko <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 29 Nov 2008 15:41:46 -0500, The Cook <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >What to do with it.
    > >
    > >I bought a fresh turkey breast this morning and stripped the meat from
    > >the bone. Did not try to get every last bit of meat off. Roasted the
    > >carcass, skin, onion, celery and carrot and the put them in a pot with
    > >water, salt and parsley. It looks and smells wonderful. It never did
    > >foam and it is very clear without me doing anything to it.
    > >
    > >Any suggestions about how to use it?
    > >
    > >BTW, I braised 1/2 of the meat and put the rest in the freezer. I am
    > >looking forward to some sandwiches with real turkey rather than
    > >getting deli stuff.

    >
    > I especially like green beans cooked in stock. I cook my rice in stock
    > instead of water, it sure makes a difference. A little stock added to
    > mashed potatoes instead of milk is nice also.
    >
    > The stock I have from my turkey is sitting in the fridge. I'll skim
    > the fat off and freeze the stock in plastic freezer bags in one cup
    > increments, that way I will have some good home made stock on hand.
    >
    > koko
    > There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    > George Bernard Shaw
    > www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    > updated 11/27


    I had to have a pasta fix the other day so made some mac and cheese. I
    cooked the noodles in stock instead of water.
    It was really good. ;-d
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them humanity cannot survive." -- Dalai Lama

  19. #19
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Turkey vs Chicken

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > jay <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Sqwertz wrote:
    > >
    > >> Turkey cock is almost as good as chicken cock.

    > >
    > >> -sw aka the Colonel

    >
    > Jay's still mad because I turned him down.
    >
    > For those of you Not in The Know, 'Jay' was passionate towards me
    > one night at an austin.food get-together at Iron Works. I turned
    > him down gracefully and thanked him for the compliment. But he
    > still harbors this grudge for some reason.
    >
    > That's why he's spouting cock, I guess.
    >
    > -sw


    Isn't that motorblade?
    He really needs to get over it...
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them humanity cannot survive." -- Dalai Lama

  20. #20
    Nexis Guest

    Default Re: Turkey stock


    "The Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > What to do with it.
    >
    > I bought a fresh turkey breast this morning and stripped the meat from
    > the bone. Did not try to get every last bit of meat off. Roasted the
    > carcass, skin, onion, celery and carrot and the put them in a pot with
    > water, salt and parsley. It looks and smells wonderful. It never did
    > foam and it is very clear without me doing anything to it.
    >
    > Any suggestions about how to use it?
    >
    > BTW, I braised 1/2 of the meat and put the rest in the freezer. I am
    > looking forward to some sandwiches with real turkey rather than
    > getting deli stuff.
    > --
    > Susan N.


    Well, gravy is the first thing that comes to my mind, but I have gravy on
    the brain the last couple days! lol
    Soup is good, turkey pot pie is wonderful. You can use it in place of
    chicken stock in recipes calling for such. Use it as an au jus when you make
    your sandwiches!

    kimberly
    --
    http://eating-sandiego.blogspot.com



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