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Thread: Transylvanian cookbook

  1. #1
    maxine in ri Guest

    Default Transylvanian cookbook

    My husband, dear sweet man that he is, was passing a table selling
    these cookbooks to raise funds for the sister church's steeple
    project. He immediately thought of me and bought one.

    It appears from the recipes I've looked at to be a derivative of
    Hungarian cooking. Lots of interesting things which I have
    ingredients right here in the house. The source for many of the
    recipes is "Transylvanian Cooking Orastie Style."

    Except that this week, I will be home approximately 9 hours a day, 6
    of which I insist on sleeping.

    maxine in ri

  2. #2
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: Transylvanian cookbook

    On Nov 1, 8:58*pm, maxine in ri <weed...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > My husband, dear sweet man that he is, was passing a table selling
    > these cookbooks to raise funds for the sister church's steeple
    > project. *He immediately thought of me and bought one.
    >
    > It appears from the recipes I've looked at to be a derivative of
    > Hungarian cooking. *Lots of interesting things which I have
    > ingredients right here in the house. *The source for many of the
    > recipes is "Transylvanian Cooking Orastie Style."
    >
    > Except that this week, I will be home approximately 9 hours a day, 6
    > of which I insist on sleeping.
    >
    > maxine in ri


    We had a Transylvanian restaurant near us for a while. As an
    amuse-bouche they had a very garlicky mushroom paste/dip.
    We always theorized the garlic kept the vampires away.

    This particular restaurant did a very nice, simple chicken noodle
    soup. Nothing particular Transylvanian about it, as far as I can
    tell, but it was absolutely delicious.

    Cindy Hamilton

  3. #3
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Transylvanian cookbook

    On Mon, 2 Nov 2009 06:17:46 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >We had a Transylvanian restaurant near us for a while.


    We used to have a Gypsy restaurant. Very nice people, but they gave
    up the restaurant to grow their catering business.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  4. #4
    AnnaBanana Guest

    Default Re: Transylvanian cookbook


    forgive me for being naive but what exactly is transylvanian cooking?




    --
    AnnaBanana

  5. #5
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: Transylvanian cookbook

    On Nov 2, 12:42*pm, AnnaBanana <AnnaBanana.534fe0a.
    433...@foodbanter.com> wrote:
    > forgive me for being naive but what exactly is transylvanian cooking?
    >
    > --
    > AnnaBanana


    As Maxine divined from a brief look at her new cookbook, it's a lot
    like
    Hungarian cooking.

    Now you know everything there is to know about it.

    Now that I have that out of my system, I recall that it was like much
    other
    Eastern European food. Noodles with sour cream, cabbage in various
    ways, something like goulash. The place closed a few years ago, and
    it's
    hard to remember what the food was like. Sorry, that's about the best
    I can manage. Maybe when Maxine has had time to really look at the
    cookbook, she'll post some recipes here.

    I googled "transylvanian cooking", but wasn't terribly satisfied with
    the
    results.

    Cindy Hamilton

  6. #6
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Transylvanian cookbook



    AnnaBanana wrote:
    >
    > forgive me for being naive but what exactly is transylvanian cooking?
    >
    > --
    > AnnaBanana


    Presumably the cooking of the Transylvania region of Romania None of
    the Romanians I know are from that region, so no idea what the cooking
    is like.

  7. #7
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: Transylvanian cookbook

    On Mon, 2 Nov 2009 17:42:37 +0000, AnnaBanana
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >forgive me for being naive but what exactly is transylvanian cooking?


    ACtually the term "Transylvanian cooking" is a misnomer. The word
    Transylvania means "beyond the forest" and, although it is now part
    of Romania, was Hungarian for centuries. Its history is woven into
    the history of Wallachia, home of Vlad Dracul (Dracula).

    Centuries ago, the then Hungarian Kings made a couple of decisions
    about Transylvania. One was to establish a stronger Hungarian
    presence there, which they did by settling Szekely people from
    southern Hungary to that region. The second was extending and
    invitation and incentives to the then King of Saxony (German)
    to promote emigration of Saxon miners to Transylvania, which
    actually happened. The region they settled in is still known
    as SiebenBurgen. So you have 2 culinary traditions, Hungarian
    (Szekely) and German. There were also significant populations
    of Jews, Armenians and, of course, native Romanians, each
    group with its own special take on cooking.

    I recommend Paul Kovi's book "Paul Kovi's Transylvanian
    Cuisine" as a great resource, as it traces the major
    cooking traditions of all these peoples.

    HTH,

    Alex

    BTW: Some believe there's another group not well understood
    in Transylvania. These are supposedly Magyar/Turkic tribes
    that were part of the great Magyar migration, but who did
    not cross into the Carpathian basin with the majority (9th
    C. AD), settling instead in the region we now know as
    Transylvania. You could consider them sort of proto-Hungarians,
    different from later Hungarian cooking (less Muslim influence)
    but still "cousins" of the Szekely people, with a fairly
    similar language. So even Hungarian cooking in T. is not
    monolithic. <G>

  8. #8
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Transylvanian cookbook

    Chemiker wrote:
    >
    > The word
    > Transylvania means "beyond the forest" and, although it is now part
    > of Romania, was Hungarian for centuries. Its history is woven into
    > the history of Wallachia, home of Vlad Dracul (Dracula).


    I thought the "trans-" part meant "in between". The forrest in between
    the mostly Christian Europeans and the mostly Muslim Ottomans.

    > Centuries ago, the then Hungarian Kings made a couple of decisions
    > about Transylvania. One was to establish a stronger Hungarian
    > presence there, which they did by settling Szekely people from
    > southern Hungary to that region. The second was extending and
    > invitation and incentives to the then King of Saxony (German)
    > to promote emigration of Saxon miners to Transylvania, which
    > actually happened. The region they settled in is still known
    > as SiebenBurgen. So you have 2 culinary traditions, Hungarian
    > (Szekely) and German. There were also significant populations
    > of Jews, Armenians and, of course, native Romanians, each
    > group with its own special take on cooking.
    >
    > I recommend Paul Kovi's book "Paul Kovi's Transylvanian
    > Cuisine" as a great resource, as it traces the major
    > cooking traditions of all these peoples.


    I would have expected Turkish/Greek influenced dishes as well.

  9. #9
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Transylvanian cookbook


    "AnnaBanana" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > forgive me for being naive but what exactly is transylvanian cooking?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > AnnaBanana


    Transylvanian stuffed cabbage with Dill

    Bacon
    Cabbage, soured with dill and savory
    Pork, fresh and smoked
    Stuffed cabbage leaves, (as above)
    Belly of pork
    2 to 3 peppercorns
    Dill
    1 glass white wine
    A little sour cream

    Grease a large saucepan and spread some slices of bacon on the bottom.
    Cover with a layer of sauerkraut, then a layer of mixed cuts of pork and
    another layer of cabbage. Now come the stuffed cabbage leaves, then a layer
    of sauerkraut, the belly of pork and finally another layer of sauerkraut.
    Add the peppercorns, finely chopped dill and wine. Cover with water and
    cook for two hours on a moderate heat, and before servings stir in a couple
    of spoons of sour cream.



    Transylvanian Lamb.

    1 1/2 to 2 c. potatoes, cut in bite
    size pieces, 2 to 3 med. potatoes
    1/2 c. onion, coarsely chopped
    2 tbsp. margarine
    1 1/2 to 2 c. cooked lamb, cubed
    1/2 c. fresh tomato, chopped
    1 tsp. thyme
    1 tsp. dill
    2 tbsp. flour
    1/4 c. milk
    1 c. sour cream

    Cook potatoes in salted water. In skillet sauté onion in margarine. Add
    lamb, tomato and spices. Cook until tomato is tender, about 10 minutes.
    With a lotted spoon remove onion, tomato and onion from skillet, leaving
    juice. Add flour to juice; thicken. Add milk. Add sour cream. Add lamb,
    tomatoes, onions and drained potatoes. Simmer until warm through 5 to 10
    minutes. This recipe is a great way to use up leftover roast lamb with
    herbs.

    TRANSYLVANIAN GOULASH

    1 lb. sauerkraut
    2 tbsp. oil
    1 c. finely chopped onions
    1/4 tsp. finely chopped garlic
    2 tbsp. sweet Hungarian paprika
    3 c. chicken stock or water
    2 lbs. boneless shoulder of pork, cut
    into 1 inch cubes
    1 1/2 tsp. caraway seeds
    1/4 c. tomato puree
    Salt
    1/2 c. sour cream
    1/2 c. heavy cream
    2 tbsp. flour

    Cook onions and garlic in oil until lightly colored. Remove from heat and
    stir in paprika. Pour in 1/2 cup of stock or water, bring to a boil, then
    add the pork cubes. Spread sauerkraut over the meat, sprinkle with caraway
    seeds. In a small bowl combine tomato puree, rest of the stock or water and
    pour over the sauerkraut. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer
    for 1 hour. Add little stock or water if needed. When the pork is tender,
    combine sour cream and heavy cream; beat in flour. Stir the mixture into
    the casserole. Simmer for 10 minutes longer. Taste for seasoning. Serve
    in deep platter, accompanied by a bowl of sour cream.


    --
    Dimitri

    Last minute grilled Cardboard :-)

    http://kitchenguide.wordpress.com.


  10. #10
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Transylvanian cookbook

    Dimitri <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Transylvanian Lamb.

    [snip]
    > 2 tbsp. margarine

    [snip]

    Margarine in a Transylvanian recipe? They'll be coming after you with
    pitchforks and torches any time now. Be very afraid!

    > TRANSYLVANIAN GOULASH
    >
    > 1 lb. sauerkraut
    > 2 tbsp. oil
    > 1 c. finely chopped onions
    > 1/4 tsp. finely chopped garlic
    > 2 tbsp. sweet Hungarian paprika
    > 3 c. chicken stock or water
    > 2 lbs. boneless shoulder of pork, cut
    > into 1 inch cubes
    > 1 1/2 tsp. caraway seeds
    > 1/4 c. tomato puree
    > Salt
    > 1/2 c. sour cream
    > 1/2 c. heavy cream
    > 2 tbsp. flour


    This is not a Transylvanian recipe; it is very obviously misnamed and
    people familiar with Hungarian cooking will recognise it at once (even
    in spite of the oil which does not belong there). The dish is Székely
    gulyás or Székely káposzta and is named not after the ethnically
    Hungarian Székely people from Transylvania, but after one József Székely
    for whom it was first prepared.

    Where'd you get these recipes, anyway?

    Victor

  11. #11
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Transylvanian cookbook


    "Victor Sack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1j8qgsv.722vb4179k7oeN%[email protected]. .
    > Dimitri <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Transylvanian Lamb.

    > [snip]
    >> 2 tbsp. margarine

    > [snip]
    >
    > Margarine in a Transylvanian recipe? They'll be coming after you with
    > pitchforks and torches any time now. Be very afraid!


    YEP - cut & paste off a big recipe data base I have. You're right as usual

    although my parish priest is from Rumania - IIRC the Transylvania district.
    He's got a Transylvania U shirt.

    LOL


    --
    Dimitri

    Last minute grilled Cardboard :-)

    http://kitchenguide.wordpress.com.


  12. #12
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: Transylvanian cookbook

    On Thu, 5 Nov 2009 23:57:13 +0100, [email protected] (Victor Sack)
    wrote:

    >Dimitri <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Margarine in a Transylvanian recipe? They'll be coming after you with
    >pitchforks and torches any time now. Be very afraid!
    >
    >> TRANSYLVANIAN GOULASH
    >>
    >> 1 lb. sauerkraut
    >> 2 tbsp. oil
    >> 1 c. finely chopped onions
    >> 1/4 tsp. finely chopped garlic
    >> 2 tbsp. sweet Hungarian paprika
    >> 3 c. chicken stock or water
    >> 2 lbs. boneless shoulder of pork, cut
    >> into 1 inch cubes
    >> 1 1/2 tsp. caraway seeds
    >> 1/4 c. tomato puree
    >> Salt
    >> 1/2 c. sour cream
    >> 1/2 c. heavy cream
    >> 2 tbsp. flour

    >
    >This is not a Transylvanian recipe; it is very obviously misnamed and
    >people familiar with Hungarian cooking will recognise it at once (even
    >in spite of the oil which does not belong there). The dish is Székely
    >gulyás or Székely káposzta and is named not after the ethnically
    >Hungarian Székely people from Transylvania, but after one József Székely
    >for whom it was first prepared.


    Amen.

    According to Geo. Lang, first served to Sandor Petofi (*) at the
    Musical Clock Cafe in Budapest. Szekely was the head of the library
    nearby, and one night worked late and tried to get some supper at this
    cafe, but the kitchen had just closed. He asked them to throw
    something together, and they served him a mix of sauerkraut, pork and
    what else was left over, with some sour cream. Petofi supposedly
    witnessed this and the next day ordered "szekely gulyas", meaning the
    mixture Szekely had been served. They did, he pronounced it good, and
    the rest is history. It is a case of 2 lies for the price of one, as
    it is neither Szekely in origin, nor is it a gulyas in culinary terms.
    For one thing, a paprikas is finished with cream, a gulyas is not.

    Alex

    (*) That is, first time served under the name "Szekely gulyas". The
    first time was served, it was called "leftovers".

  13. #13
    --Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Transylvanian cookbook

    On Nov 5, 4:57*pm, azaze...@koroviev.de (Victor Sack) wrote:
    > Dimitri <Dimitr...@prodigy.net> wrote:
    > > Transylvanian Lamb.

    > [snip]
    > > 2 tbsp. margarine

    >
    > [snip]
    >
    > Margarine in a Transylvanian recipe? *They'll be coming after you with
    > pitchforks and torches any time now. *Be very afraid!
    >

    Anyone who recommends eating margarine should be poked with a
    pitchfork or a cattle prod.
    >
    > Victor


    --Bryan

  14. #14
    --Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Transylvanian cookbook

    On Nov 5, 11:53*pm, "Dimitri" <Dimitr...@prodigy.net> wrote:
    > "Victor Sack" <azaze...@koroviev.de> wrote in message
    >
    > news:1j8qgsv.722vb4179k7oeN%[email protected]. .
    >
    > > Dimitri <Dimitr...@prodigy.net> wrote:

    >
    > >> Transylvanian Lamb.

    > > [snip]
    > >> 2 tbsp. margarine

    > > [snip]

    >
    > > Margarine in a Transylvanian recipe? *They'll be coming after you with
    > > pitchforks and torches any time now. *Be very afraid!

    >
    > YEP - cut & paste off a big recipe data base I have. You're right as usual
    >
    > although my parish priest is from Rumania - IIRC the Transylvania district.
    > He's got a Transylvania U shirt.
    >
    > LOL


    One of the residents of a small town near here thought it would be
    funny to have a bunch of sweatshirts printed that said University of
    Grubville:
    http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&rl...ed=0CAgQ8gEwAA
    >
    > --
    > Dimitri


    --Bryan

  15. #15
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Transylvanian cookbook

    Chemiker <[email protected]> wrote:

    > It is a case of 2 lies for the price of one, as
    > it is neither Szekely in origin, nor is it a gulyas in culinary terms.
    > For one thing, a paprikas is finished with cream, a gulyas is not.


    The dish is remarkable in the lie department. In Germany, it is very
    popular and is invariably called Szegediner Gulasch, even though it has
    just as little to do with the city of Szeged as with the Székely people.

    Victor

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