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Thread: Transportation of Frittata Question

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Transportation of Frittata Question

    I plan to take a frittata to a relatives Christmas party on Saturday.
    Should I mix everything together, and bake at her place (which in the
    past verged on chaos). Should I cook it at home and, then just warm it
    up at her house. It might be about six hours between cooking and
    warmup. The high temps in the area will be around 26 degrees F, so I
    do not think it would spoil. Should I just mix the eggs together, and
    add everything else (cooked sauage, scallions, cheese, and mushrooms)
    when I get there, and then bake.

    Thanks

    Tom

  2. #2
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: Transportation of Frittata Question

    On Wed, 15 Dec 2010 12:58:17 -0800 (PST), "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I plan to take a frittata to a relatives Christmas party on Saturday.
    >Should I mix everything together, and bake at her place (which in the
    >past verged on chaos). Should I cook it at home and, then just warm it
    >up at her house. It might be about six hours between cooking and
    >warmup. The high temps in the area will be around 26 degrees F, so I
    >do not think it would spoil. Should I just mix the eggs together, and
    >add everything else (cooked sauage, scallions, cheese, and mushrooms)
    >when I get there, and then bake.
    >
    >Thanks
    >
    >Tom


    To me, this is a hard question. Given my 'druthers, I would always
    like to serve a fritatta right out fo the pan. Then again, I can't
    begin to count the mornings I have eaten cold fritatta with relish
    (think morning-after pizza).

    Perhaps cook that puppy, chill it, and go to the gathering. Slice the
    fritatta thin and serve as an appetizer or snack. If I could, I would
    cook it in place and serve warm. But NOT reheated. YMMV.

    Alex, thinking quiche-like.

  3. #3
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Transportation of Frittata Question

    On Wed, 15 Dec 2010 12:58:17 -0800 (PST), "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I plan to take a frittata to a relatives Christmas party on Saturday.
    > Should I mix everything together, and bake at her place (which in the
    > past verged on chaos). Should I cook it at home and, then just warm it
    > up at her house. It might be about six hours between cooking and
    > warmup. The high temps in the area will be around 26 degrees F, so I
    > do not think it would spoil. Should I just mix the eggs together, and
    > add everything else (cooked sauage, scallions, cheese, and mushrooms)
    > when I get there, and then bake.
    >


    Make and bake at home. Transport it cooked and serve at room
    temperature. It doesn't need to be served freshly made or hot.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  4. #4
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Transportation of Frittata Question

    "tombates" wrote:
    "
    >I plan to take a frittata to a relatives Christmas party on Saturday.
    >Should I mix everything together, and bake at her place (which in the
    >past verged on chaos). Should I cook it at home and, then just warm it
    >up at her house. It might be about six hours between cooking and
    >warmup. The high temps in the area will be around 26 degrees F, so I
    >do not think it would spoil. Should I just mix the eggs together, and
    >add everything else (cooked sauage, scallions, cheese, and mushrooms)
    >when I get there, and then bake.


    Transport it cooked... then serve it cold... cold fritatta is
    excellent, tell the naysayers it's crustless quiche/dessert kugel

  5. #5
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Transportation of Frittata Question


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >I plan to take a frittata to a relatives Christmas party on Saturday.
    > Should I mix everything together, and bake at her place (which in the
    > past verged on chaos). Should I cook it at home and, then just warm it
    > up at her house. It might be about six hours between cooking and
    > warmup. The high temps in the area will be around 26 degrees F, so I
    > do not think it would spoil. Should I just mix the eggs together, and
    > add everything else (cooked sauage, scallions, cheese, and mushrooms)
    > when I get there, and then bake.
    >
    > Thanks


    I would bake it the night before and take it refrigerated, on ice. It might
    be cold outside but it won't be cold in your vehicle.



  6. #6
    A Moose in Love Guest

    Default Re: Transportation of Frittata Question

    On Dec 15, 5:50*pm, "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote:
    > <tomba...@city-net.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > >I plan to take a frittata to a relatives Christmas party on Saturday.
    > > Should I mix everything together, and bake at her place (which in the
    > > past verged on chaos). Should I cook it at home and, then just warm it
    > > up at her house. It might be about six hours between cooking and
    > > warmup. The high temps in the area will be around 26 degrees F, so I
    > > do not think it would spoil. Should I just mix the eggs together, and
    > > add everything else (cooked sauage, scallions, cheese, and mushrooms)
    > > when I get there, and then bake.

    >
    > > Thanks

    >
    > I would bake it the night before and take it refrigerated, on ice. *It might
    > be cold outside but it won't be cold in your vehicle.


    I'd do the fritatta at site. It's simple. It's basically an open
    faced omelette.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frittata

  7. #7
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Transportation of Frittata Question


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >I plan to take a frittata to a relatives Christmas party on Saturday.
    > Should I mix everything together, and bake at her place (which in the
    > past verged on chaos). Should I cook it at home and, then just warm it
    > up at her house. It might be about six hours between cooking and
    > warmup. The high temps in the area will be around 26 degrees F, so I
    > do not think it would spoil. Should I just mix the eggs together, and
    > add everything else (cooked sauage, scallions, cheese, and mushrooms)
    > when I get there, and then bake.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Tom


    Partial cook at home the finish the cooking at the party - you'll have
    better results.

    Dimitri


  8. #8
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Transportation of Frittata Question


    "sf" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio >
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I plan to take a frittata to a relatives Christmas party on Saturday.
    >> Should I mix everything together, and bake at her place (which in the
    >> past verged on chaos). Should I cook it at home and, then just warm it
    >> up at her house. It might be about six hours between cooking and
    >> warmup. The high temps in the area will be around 26 degrees F, so I
    >> do not think it would spoil. Should I just mix the eggs together, and
    >> add everything else (cooked sauage, scallions, cheese, and mushrooms)
    >> when I get there, and then bake.
    >>

    >
    > Make and bake at home. Transport it cooked and serve at room
    > temperature. It doesn't need to be served freshly made or hot.


    It almost never is. It usually doesn't have so many different things in it,
    either.



  9. #9
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Transportation of Frittata Question

    On Thu, 16 Dec 2010 09:21:28 +0100, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio >
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I plan to take a frittata to a relatives Christmas party on Saturday.
    > >> Should I mix everything together, and bake at her place (which in the
    > >> past verged on chaos). Should I cook it at home and, then just warm it
    > >> up at her house. It might be about six hours between cooking and
    > >> warmup. The high temps in the area will be around 26 degrees F, so I
    > >> do not think it would spoil. Should I just mix the eggs together, and
    > >> add everything else (cooked sauage, scallions, cheese, and mushrooms)
    > >> when I get there, and then bake.
    > >>

    > >
    > > Make and bake at home. Transport it cooked and serve at room
    > > temperature. It doesn't need to be served freshly made or hot.

    >
    > It almost never is. It usually doesn't have so many different things in it,
    > either.
    >


    Yeah. I don't put all that stuff in mine either, but he didn't ask
    about his ingredients, just about transport and serve. IFAIWC, it was
    yet another example of taking something easy and making it hard.

    'Tis the season!

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  10. #10
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Transportation of Frittata Question

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Should I just mix the eggs together, and
    > add everything else (cooked sauage, scallions, cheese, and mushrooms)
    > when I get there, and then bake.


    Yes.

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
    Pepparkakor particulars posted 11-29-2010;
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller

  11. #11
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Transportation of Frittata Question

    Giusi wrote:

    >>> I plan to take a frittata to a relatives Christmas party on Saturday.
    >>> Should I mix everything together, and bake at her place (which in the
    >>> past verged on chaos). Should I cook it at home and, then just warm it
    >>> up at her house. It might be about six hours between cooking and
    >>> warmup. The high temps in the area will be around 26 degrees F, so I
    >>> do not think it would spoil. Should I just mix the eggs together, and
    >>> add everything else (cooked sauage, scallions, cheese, and mushrooms)
    >>> when I get there, and then bake.

    >>
    >> Make and bake at home. Transport it cooked and serve at room
    >> temperature. It doesn't need to be served freshly made or hot.

    >
    > It almost never is. It usually doesn't have so many different things in
    > it, either.


    From an Italian perspective, you are 100% correct. But most Americans prefer
    freshly-made frittati served still steaming hot, and would view a
    room-temperature frittata with suspicion. As for the number of ingredients,
    well, it's a Christmas party, so "feast rules" apply.

    Bob



  12. #12
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Transportation of Frittata Question

    On Thu, 16 Dec 2010 18:52:16 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >From an Italian perspective, you are 100% correct. But most Americans prefer
    >freshly-made frittati served still steaming hot, and would view a
    >room-temperature frittata with suspicion. As for the number of ingredients,
    >well, it's a Christmas party, so "feast rules" apply.


    Giusi is in Italy, so a room temp frittata wouldn't be out of the
    ordinary. At least I think she is making this frittata in Italy..but
    I could be wrong on this. I am only catching this thread just now.

    Even so, I wouldn't hesitate to serve a frittata at room temp. Even
    to Americans...just educate them to the fact that it is perfectly okay
    and delicious this way.

    Christine

    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  13. #13
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Transportation of Frittata Question

    Christine wrote:

    >> From an Italian perspective, you are 100% correct. But most Americans
    >> prefer freshly-made frittati served still steaming hot, and would view a
    >> room-temperature frittata with suspicion. As for the number of
    >> ingredients, well, it's a Christmas party, so "feast rules" apply.

    >
    > Giusi is in Italy, so a room temp frittata wouldn't be out of the
    > ordinary. At least I think she is making this frittata in Italy..but
    > I could be wrong on this. I am only catching this thread just now.


    Giusi's not the one making the frittata. It's being made by Tom Bates in
    America and for Americans.


    > Even so, I wouldn't hesitate to serve a frittata at room temp. Even
    > to Americans...just educate them to the fact that it is perfectly okay
    > and delicious this way.


    I'm not sure that a Christmas party is the time to educate diners on that
    kind of thing. It's easier just to give them what they want.

    Bob



  14. #14
    Paco Guest

    Default Re: Transportation of Frittata Question



    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news:4d0ad05d$0$5878$c3e8da3$[email protected] b.com...
    > Giusi wrote:
    >
    >>>> I plan to take a frittata to a relatives Christmas party on Saturday.
    >>>> Should I mix everything together, and bake at her place (which in the
    >>>> past verged on chaos). Should I cook it at home and, then just warm it
    >>>> up at her house. It might be about six hours between cooking and
    >>>> warmup. The high temps in the area will be around 26 degrees F, so I
    >>>> do not think it would spoil. Should I just mix the eggs together, and
    >>>> add everything else (cooked sauage, scallions, cheese, and mushrooms)
    >>>> when I get there, and then bake.
    >>>
    >>> Make and bake at home. Transport it cooked and serve at room
    >>> temperature. It doesn't need to be served freshly made or hot.

    >>
    >> It almost never is. It usually doesn't have so many different things in
    >> it, either.

    >
    > From an Italian perspective, you are 100% correct. But most Americans
    > prefer freshly-made frittati served still steaming hot, and would view a
    > room-temperature frittata with suspicion. As for the number of
    > ingredients, well, it's a Christmas party, so "feast rules" apply.
    >
    > Bob
    >


    The plural for frittata is frittatas in English and frittate in Italian.
    Just sayin'! :-)




  15. #15
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Transportation of Frittata Question

    Paco wrote:

    > The plural for frittata is frittatas in English and frittate in Italian.
    > Just sayin'! :-)


    Thanks!

    Bob




  16. #16
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Transportation of Frittata Question

    "Paco" <paco@taco.[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >
    >"Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    >news:4d0ad05d$0$5878$c3e8da3$[email protected] eb.com...
    >> Giusi wrote:
    >>
    >>>>> I plan to take a frittata to a relatives Christmas party on Saturday.
    >>>>> Should I mix everything together, and bake at her place (which in the
    >>>>> past verged on chaos). Should I cook it at home and, then just warm it
    >>>>> up at her house. It might be about six hours between cooking and
    >>>>> warmup. The high temps in the area will be around 26 degrees F, so I
    >>>>> do not think it would spoil. Should I just mix the eggs together, and
    >>>>> add everything else (cooked sauage, scallions, cheese, and mushrooms)
    >>>>> when I get there, and then bake.
    >>>>
    >>>> Make and bake at home. Transport it cooked and serve at room
    >>>> temperature. It doesn't need to be served freshly made or hot.
    >>>
    >>> It almost never is. It usually doesn't have so many different things in
    >>> it, either.

    >>
    >> From an Italian perspective, you are 100% correct. But most Americans
    >> prefer freshly-made frittati served still steaming hot, and would view a
    >> room-temperature frittata with suspicion. As for the number of
    >> ingredients, well, it's a Christmas party, so "feast rules" apply.
    >>
    >> Bob
    >>

    >
    >The plural for frittata is frittatas in English and frittate in Italian.
    >Just sayin'! :-)


    FritTATAS in spic speak. Just sayin'! ( ^ )( ^ )



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