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Thread: Too hot for cookin'

  1. #1
    Mr. Bill Guest

    Default Too hot for cookin'

    It is just too hot....heard the "real feel" temps in Memphis at 119F
    at 4PM.

    But...we still have to eat something...

    http://whstoneman.blogspot.com/2010/08/jerk.html


    Hope your evening is cool as a cucumber.








    Join me....a little fun, some ramblings and good recipes

    http://whstoneman.blogspot.com

  2. #2
    Steve B Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin'


    "Mr. Bill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > It is just too hot....heard the "real feel" temps in Memphis at 119F
    > at 4PM.
    >
    > But...we still have to eat something...
    >
    > http://whstoneman.blogspot.com/2010/08/jerk.html
    >
    >
    > Hope your evening is cool as a cucumber.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Join me....a little fun, some ramblings and good recipes
    >
    > http://whstoneman.blogspot.com


    Cooling off here nicely at sunset in xxtreme SW Utah. Very nice at night.
    Still a little hot in the day, at about 103 today. Down from 112. Light
    humidity. Hope summer is over so I can start on brewing some beer, and get
    on to welding projects, one of which will be a steel rotisserie motor slow
    cooker.

    Steve

    visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com



  3. #3
    Mr. Bill Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin'

    On Tue, 3 Aug 2010 17:10:34 -0700, "Steve B"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Mr. Bill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >> It is just too hot....heard the "real feel" temps in Memphis at 119F
    >> at 4PM.
    >>
    >> But...we still have to eat something...
    >>
    >> http://whstoneman.blogspot.com/2010/08/jerk.html


    >> Join me....a little fun, some ramblings and good recipes
    >>
    >> http://whstoneman.blogspot.com

    >
    >Cooling off here nicely at sunset in xxtreme SW Utah. Very nice at night.
    >Still a little hot in the day, at about 103 today. Down from 112. Light
    >humidity. Hope summer is over so I can start on brewing some beer, and get
    >on to welding projects, one of which will be a steel rotisserie motor slow
    >cooker.
    >
    >Steve
    >
    >visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
    >


    WOW...YOU have been thru a lot!! Hang in there bud!! Maybe someday
    you can give me some "beer" lessons!!






    Join me....a little fun, some ramblings and good recipes

    http://whstoneman.blogspot.com

  4. #4
    PeterL Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin'

    Mr. Bill <[email protected]> wrote in news:4mah565dhkh7ua2uvd2url0l12n1h7ioa6@
    4ax.com:

    > It is just too hot....heard the "real feel" temps in Memphis at 119F
    > at 4PM.
    >
    > But...we still have to eat something...
    >
    > http://whstoneman.blogspot.com/2010/08/jerk.html




    Looks good, and that Jerk marinade looks to be a cinch to make.



    Might have to try this one, thanks!!


    >
    >
    > Hope your evening is cool as a cucumber.
    >



    Freezing our arses off of a night lately.......

    Thank God!! for Hungarian Goosedown quilts!!!


    http://www.bom.gov.au/qld/observations/brisbane.shtml


    It's up to about 15-18C at the moment. (59-64F)

    It was down to about 44F early this morning.

    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia


    Mary had a little lamb
    Its fleece was white and wispy.
    Then it caught Foot and Mouth Disease
    And now it's black and crispy.

  5. #5
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin'

    Mr. Bill wrote:
    > It is just too hot....heard the "real feel" temps in Memphis at 119F
    > at 4PM.
    >
    > But...we still have to eat something...
    >




    Smoothies?
    Sundaes?
    Chicken salad?

    Anything cold sounds good.

    gloria p

  6. #6
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin'

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Mr. Bill <[email protected]> wrote:

    > It is just too hot....heard the "real feel" temps in Memphis at 119F
    > at 4PM.
    >
    > But...we still have to eat something...
    >
    > http://whstoneman.blogspot.com/2010/08/jerk.html
    >
    >
    > Hope your evening is cool as a cucumber.


    It's 75F, down from a high of 78F. We're having a grilled tritip,
    scalloped potatoes and sauteed vegetables.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  7. #7
    Gorio Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin'


    gloria.p;1513836 Wrote:
    > Mr. Bill wrote:-
    > It is just too hot....heard the "real feel" temps in Memphis at 119F
    > at 4PM.
    >
    > But...we still have to eat something...
    > -
    >
    >
    >
    > Smoothies?
    > Sundaes?
    > Chicken salad?
    >
    > Anything cold sounds good.
    >
    > gloria p


    A/C Mexican Restaurant with some hefty Margaritas sounds like a fit.
    This is why I always make a bunch of fajitas that I can warm up on the
    grill in 5 minutes with some Mexican rice and beans I can nuke and make
    my own Margaritas. Saves a few bucks.

    The beans and rice may be a little heavy; but that's why I pay for the
    A/C.




    --
    Gorio

  8. #8
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin'

    Billy wrote:

    > It is just too hot....heard the "real feel" temps in Memphis at 119F
    > at 4PM.


    Wimp! It's been over 120 here every day for the last month. But it's a DRY
    heat, at least. So dry that for the first time in my life, I've had to use
    Curel to keep my skin from cracking.

    This does open an interesting discussion, though, which seems to get brought
    up just about every year. What do people have for food when the weather is
    that hot? Aside from the fact that nobody wants to cook in the heat, it's
    often true that they don't have much interest in eating, either. I tend
    toward cold soups and main-dish salads. I'll post individual recipes here in
    this same thread, so that readers don't have to click a link to an
    attention-seeking blogger's "LOOK AT ME" site. Note that most of the soup
    recipes require cooking, but that can be done in the coolest part of the
    day.

    Bob




  9. #9
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin' - Cara Caldbeck's Cold Carrot Concoction

    Cara Caldbeck's Cold Carrot Concoction

    "Peel and slice a pound of carrots, place in a medium saucepan, pour enough
    chicken broth over to cover, then simmer uncovered until carrots are very
    soft (about 20 minutes). Add more chicken broth during cooking to keep
    carrots covered, if necessary. Puree the soup and add cream or sour cream
    if so desired and salt and pepper to taste. I also like to add a dash of
    curry powder and/or fruit-based hot sauce."




  10. #10
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin' - Chilled Carrot Soup with Cumin and Lime

    CHILLED CARROT SOUP WITH CUMIN AND LIME
    (from Bon Appetit, via epicurious.com)

    2 tablespoons olive oil
    2 pounds carrots, peeled, chopped (about 5 cups)
    2 large leeks (white and pale green parts only), chopped (about 2 cups)
    1 tablespoon chopped garlic
    3 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
    1/2 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
    6 1/2 cups (or more) canned low-salt chicken broth
    8 tablespoons sour cream

    2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
    2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
    2 teaspoons grated lime peel


    Heat oil in heavy large pot over medium-high heat. Add carrots and leeks;
    sauté until leeks begin to soften but not brown, about 5 minutes. Add
    garlic; sauté 1 minute. Add cumin and crushed red pepper; sauté 30 seconds
    longer. Add 6 1/2 cups chicken broth. Bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer
    uncovered until vegetables are very tender, about 35 minutes.
    Working in batches, puree soup in blender until smooth. Transfer soup to
    large bowl. Cool. Whisk in 6 tablespoons sour cream. Cover soup and
    refrigerate until cold, at least 4 hours or overnight.

    Stir lime juice into soup. Thin soup with more broth, if desired. Season
    with salt and pepper. Ladle into 4 bowls. Spoon 1/2 tablespoon sour cream
    atop each serving. Sprinkle with cilantro and lime peel.

    Serves 4.




  11. #11
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin' - Chilled Lettuce and Pea Soup

    Chilled Lettuce and Pea Soup (from _A Celebration of Soups_)

    4 tablespoons butter
    4 medium-sized onions, peeled and chopped
    1 large head iceberg lettuce or 3 heads Boston lettuce, rinsed, trimmed, and
    shredded
    1 1/4 pounds peas, shelled
    6 cups chicken stock
    3 bay leaves
    3 whole cloves
    2 teaspoons sugar
    Salt
    White pepper
    Chopped fresh mint

    In a soup kettle heat the butter over medium-low heat and cook the onions
    until translucent.

    Add the next seven ingredients. Bring the liquid to a boil, reduce the heat,
    and simmer the vegetables, covered, for 45 minutes.

    Blend the mixture (either in a blender or with an immersion blender in the
    pot) until it is smooth.

    Season the soup with salt and white pepper. Chill it for at least 4 hours.
    Before serving, taste and re-season if necessary. Serve garnished with mint.


    BOB'S NOTES:

    1. This makes about a half-gallon of soup; I generally cut the recipe by a
    factor of three.

    2. It sounds like you might not need the sugar. Taste the soup before adding
    it and don't add it if you think it might make the soup too sweet.

    3. Do try to use white pepper rather than black pepper; it makes a
    difference.

    4. Instead of doing the mint garnish, you could put a dollop of yogurt, sour
    cream, or creme fraiche on top of the soup. I've been known to pour a couple
    tablespoons of buttermilk on top instead and sprinkle with crumbled bacon.




  12. #12
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin' - Cold Cream of Zucchini and Watercress Soup

    Cold Cream of Zucchini and Watercress Soup

    2 tablespoons unsalted butter
    1/2 cup chopped yellow onion
    1 teaspoon minced garlic
    1 1/4 pounds zucchini, trimmed and chopped
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
    3 cups chicken stock
    1 sprig thyme
    1 cup packed watercress leaves [1]
    1 tablespoon minced parsley leaves
    1 cup heavy cream
    1/4 cup creme fraiche or sour cream
    Watercress sprigs, tough stems removed, garnish [1]
    Chopped chives, garnish
    Cheddar-Pecan Crackers, accompaniment, recipe follows


    In a saucepan, melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the onions and
    cook, stirring, for 3 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for 15 seconds. Add
    the zucchini, salt, and pepper, and cook until tender. Add the stock and
    thyme and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, stirring
    occasionally, for 20 minutes.
    Add the watercress and let wilt, about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and
    discard the thyme sprig.

    With a hand-held immersion blender or in batches in a food processor, puree
    the soup. Return to the heat and stir in the cream. Heat gently and cook for
    5 minutes. Adjust the seasoning, to taste, keeping in mind, that salt is
    less evident in cold foods.

    Let cool and refrigerate until well chilled, at least 4 to 6 hours.

    Transfer to a large thermos. To serve, pour into double-handled cream soup
    bowls or decorative cups. Swirl creme fraiche into each serving and garnish
    with watercress sprigs and chives. Serve with cheese crackers.


    Cheddar-Pecan Crackers:
    1 cup all-purpose flour
    1/2 teaspoon cayenne
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1 stick unsalted butter, cut into pieces and softened
    1 cup packed grated cheddar cheese
    1/2 cup chopped toasted pecans
    1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds

    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
    Into a bowl, sift together the flour, cayenne, and salt.

    In another bowl, cream together the butter and cheese. Add the dry
    ingredients and mix together. Fold in the pecans and sesame seeds. Drop onto
    the baking sheet 1 teaspoon at a time, spreading gently to flatten into
    rounds. Bake until golden and crisp around the edges, about 15 minutes.

    Remove from the oven and let cool slightly before serving, or serve at room
    temperature.

    Yield: about 1 dozen
    Prep Time: 20 minutes
    Cook Time: 15 minutes

    BOB'S NOTE:
    [1] I've made this using a variety of alternatives to the watercress. Use
    any leafy greens you like. A mixture of spinach and arugula works well in
    the soup, and sunflower sprouts work well as the garnish.

    Bob




  13. #13
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin'

    Mr. Bill <[email protected]> wrote:

    > It is just too hot....heard the "real feel" temps in Memphis at 119F
    > at 4PM.
    >
    > But...we still have to eat something...
    >
    > http://whstoneman.blogspot.com/2010/08/jerk.html
    >
    >
    > Hope your evening is cool as a cucumber.



    That's "Death Valley, CA" temperature!!! Supposedly headed this way
    (Philly).

    I bought another couple pounds of deli cold cuts and rolls at the
    supermarket.

    Andy

  14. #14
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin' - Cucumber and Melon Soup

    Cucumber and Melon Soup
    Original recipe adapted from Marcus Samuelsson and Johan Svensson

    1 cucumber
    1/2 cantaloupe melon
    1/4 watermelon
    1 lemon
    Sriracha chili sauce, or other hot sauce to taste
    Salt and pepper to taste

    Peel and seed cucumber; chop into large pieces. Cut melons away from rinds
    into large pieces. Put cucumber and melons into blender. Squeeze lemon juice
    into blender. Blend until smooth. Add hot sauce, salt and pepper to taste.

    Serves 4


    Bob




  15. #15
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin' - Gazpacho Andaluz

    Gazpacho Andaluz
    from _The Foods & Wines of Spain_ by Penelope Casas

    Although gazpacho originated in the southern lands of Andalucía, it is today
    one of the most universally loved soups in the world. There is absolutely
    nothing like it during the hot summer months, although it seems to be just
    as popular when the weather turns cold.

    This gazpacho recipe comes from the files of my Spanish mother-in-law, who
    claims that most gazpachos contain too much bread and oil and consequently
    are unnecessarily heavy and fattening. She has eliminated both of these
    ingredients entirely, producing a bright red and truly refreshing version of
    this famous soup, which has often been referred to as "liquid salad." Even
    my mother-in-law makes her gazpacho today in a blender, although
    traditionally the gazpacho ingredients were painstakingly pushed through a
    metal cone-shaped sieve. Purists still insist that this method produces a
    superior gazpacho.

    It is customary to serve the gazpacho and then pass small bowls containing
    croutons, cucumbers, green pepper, tomato, and onion for the diner to
    sprinkle on his soup as he pleases.

    Gazpacho is at its best, of course, when made with juicy red vine-ripened
    tomatoes. If they are not available, I find it preferable to use
    good-quality canned tomatoes and skip the awful mushy tomatoes found in
    markets most of the year. A mixture of canned and fresh tomatoes, even when
    the fresh tomatoes are not of top quality, also produces good results.

    Serves 6

    1 1/2 pounds fresh or canned ripe tomatoes
    1 medium green pepper, cut in pieces
    1 small onion, cut in pieces
    2 small Kirby cucumbers or 1 small cucumber, peeled and cut in pieces
    4 tablespoons red wine vinegar
    1/4 teaspoon tarragon
    1/4 teaspoon sugar
    1 clove garlic, chopped
    1 cup tomato juice or ice water (if the tomatoes are very flavorful, use ice
    water)
    Salt
    Diced cucumber, green pepper, tomato, and onion for garnish

    CROUTONS
    2 tablespoons butter
    1 clove garlic, crushed
    6 slices white bread, crusts removed, cut in small cubes

    To make the soup, place all ingredients excep the garnish in the bowl of a
    processor or blender, in several steps if necessary. Blend until no large
    pieces remain. Strain, pressing with the back of a wooden spoon to extract
    as much liquid as possible. Correct the seasoning, adding more salt and
    vinegar if desired. Chill very well, preferably overnight.

    To make the croutons, melt the butter in a heavy skillet. Add the crushed
    garlic, then stir in the bread cubes, coating them with the butter and
    garlic. Cook over a very low flame, stirring occasionally, for about 30
    minutes, or until the bread cubes are golden and very crunchy. Cool.

    Serve the soup and pass the garnishes and the croutons. Gazpacho keeps for
    several days in the refrigerator.

    BOB'S NOTE: You can substitute other herbs for the tarragon. Basil,
    marjoram, or chervil work well; so does a combination of mint and cilantro
    and/or basil.


    Bob




  16. #16
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin' - Iced Korean Cucumber Soup

    Iced Korean Cucumber Soup

    2 cucumbers
    2 cups chicken broth, fat removed
    1 cup water
    1/2 cup cider vinegar
    1/4 cup soy sauce
    1 tablespoon sesame oil
    1-1/2 teaspoons sugar
    1 teaspoon white pepper
    4 green onions
    2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds
    15 to 20 ice cubes

    1. If the cucumbers are waxy, peel them. If the skin is thin and unwaxed,
    leave it on. Slice the cucumber into matchstick pieces, about 2 inches in
    length.

    2. Trim the roots and any ragged tops off the green onions and slice them on
    the diagonal into 1/4 inch wide bits.

    3. In a large serving bowl, mix together the chicken broth, water, cider
    vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil, sugar and white pepper. Stir in the cucumber
    and green onions. Chill well. At this point the soup will keep for several
    hours.

    4. Just before serving, stir the ice cubes and sesame seeds into the soup.
    Taste the soup to correct the seasonings. It should be pleasantly tart and
    slightly salty, with a hint of sesame. If the flavorings seem too strong,
    then dilute with additional water, but keep in mind that the ice cubes will
    weaken the flavors as they melt.

    Serves 4 to 6.


    Bob




  17. #17
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin'


    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> ha scritto nel messaggio

    I'll post individual recipes here in
    > this same thread, so that readers don't have to click a link to an >
    > attention-seeking blogger's "LOOK AT ME" site.


    Enormous raspberry here. Thbbbppp.



  18. #18
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin' - Summer Gazpacho with Dungeness Crab

    Summer Gazpacho with Dungeness Crab
    Adapted from a recipe by Chef Ann Cooper

    1 clove garlic
    1 pound tomatoes
    4 ounces red pepper, seeded [1]
    4 ounces celery
    4 ounces onion
    6 ounces fennel
    6 ounces fresh corn, cut from the cob
    2 ounces olive oil
    6 ounces cucumber, peeled and seeded
    1 cup V-8 or tomato juice [2]
    1/2 cup shrimp or lobster stock
    1 1/2 ounces balsamic vinegar
    3 ounces extra virgin olive oil
    1/2 teaspoon sea salt
    1/8 teaspoon black pepper, freshly ground
    1/2 teaspoon Tabasco sauce, or to taste
    1 teaspoon flat leaf parsley, chopped
    2 teaspoons cilantro, chopped
    1 1/2 Tablespoons chives, thinly sliced
    8 ounces Dungeness crabmeat

    Preheat oven to 350º F. Rub the garlic and half of the tomatoes, peppers,
    celery, onions, and fennel with olive oil and roast in oven until al
    dente.[3] Roast half of the corn in oven, cool slightly, shuck and cut
    kernels from cobs.[3] Purée roasted vegetables in a blender or food
    processor. Finely dice remaining raw vegetables, except for corn. Mix all
    ingredients together in a large bowl and adjust seasonings to taste. Ladle
    soup into 4 bowls. Place 2 ounces of crabmeat in center of each bowl and
    serve.

    Serves 4.

    BOB'S NOTES:
    [1] Note that except for the olive oil, the term "ounces" refers to the
    product's weight, not volume.
    [2] I have recommended using Clamato in similar recipes, but I think its
    sweetness would be over the top in this one.
    [3] If you don't want to heat up your kitchen, a great alternative is using
    a wire basket on the grill. In that case, you'd want to leave the corn on
    the cob and cut it off after it's cooked. Broiling is also feasible, and a
    bit faster than roasting, but still heats up your kitchen.

    Bob




  19. #19
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin' - Gazpacho Andaluz

    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > Gazpacho Andaluz
    > from _The Foods & Wines of Spain_ by Penelope Casas
    >
    > Although gazpacho originated in the southern lands of Andalucía, it is
    > today one of the most universally loved soups in the world. There is
    > absolutely nothing like it during the hot summer months, although it
    > seems to be just as popular when the weather turns cold.
    >
    > This gazpacho recipe comes from the files of my Spanish mother-in-law,
    > who claims that most gazpachos contain too much bread and oil and
    > consequently are unnecessarily heavy and fattening. She has eliminated
    > both of these ingredients entirely, producing a bright red and truly
    > refreshing version of this famous soup, which has often been referred
    > to as "liquid salad." Even my mother-in-law makes her gazpacho today
    > in a blender, although traditionally the gazpacho ingredients were
    > painstakingly pushed through a metal cone-shaped sieve. Purists still
    > insist that this method produces a superior gazpacho.
    >
    > It is customary to serve the gazpacho and then pass small bowls
    > containing croutons, cucumbers, green pepper, tomato, and onion for
    > the diner to sprinkle on his soup as he pleases.
    >
    > Gazpacho is at its best, of course, when made with juicy red
    > vine-ripened tomatoes. If they are not available, I find it preferable
    > to use good-quality canned tomatoes and skip the awful mushy tomatoes
    > found in markets most of the year. A mixture of canned and fresh
    > tomatoes, even when the fresh tomatoes are not of top quality, also
    > produces good results.
    >
    > Serves 6
    >
    > 1 1/2 pounds fresh or canned ripe tomatoes
    > 1 medium green pepper, cut in pieces
    > 1 small onion, cut in pieces
    > 2 small Kirby cucumbers or 1 small cucumber, peeled and cut in pieces
    > 4 tablespoons red wine vinegar
    > 1/4 teaspoon tarragon
    > 1/4 teaspoon sugar
    > 1 clove garlic, chopped
    > 1 cup tomato juice or ice water (if the tomatoes are very flavorful,
    > use ice water)
    > Salt
    > Diced cucumber, green pepper, tomato, and onion for garnish
    >
    > CROUTONS
    > 2 tablespoons butter
    > 1 clove garlic, crushed
    > 6 slices white bread, crusts removed, cut in small cubes
    >
    > To make the soup, place all ingredients excep the garnish in the bowl
    > of a processor or blender, in several steps if necessary. Blend until
    > no large pieces remain. Strain, pressing with the back of a wooden
    > spoon to extract as much liquid as possible. Correct the seasoning,
    > adding more salt and vinegar if desired. Chill very well, preferably
    > overnight.
    >
    > To make the croutons, melt the butter in a heavy skillet. Add the
    > crushed garlic, then stir in the bread cubes, coating them with the
    > butter and garlic. Cook over a very low flame, stirring occasionally,
    > for about 30 minutes, or until the bread cubes are golden and very
    > crunchy. Cool.
    >
    > Serve the soup and pass the garnishes and the croutons. Gazpacho keeps
    > for several days in the refrigerator.
    >
    > BOB'S NOTE: You can substitute other herbs for the tarragon. Basil,
    > marjoram, or chervil work well; so does a combination of mint and
    > cilantro and/or basil.
    >
    >
    > Bob



    As if you'd have the ingredients and actually want to cook those recipes
    in 120 F. desert heat!

    Screw that! Lettuce, tomato, onion, roast beef, roast turkey, Dijon
    mustard. Ready in minutes.

    I have a tough time believing you're anywhere close to Iraq!!!

    Andy

  20. #20
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Too hot for cookin' - Swan's Summer Soup

    Swan's Summer Soup

    4 large tomatoes
    1 avocado - peeled, pitted and diced
    1/2 cup fresh corn kernels
    2 tomatoes, diced
    1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
    1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
    salt and pepper to taste

    Using a juicer, extract the juice of the 4 large tomatoes. [1]
    In a medium bowl combine the tomato juice, avocado, corn, 2 diced tomatoes,
    cilantro, and lemon juice. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer to
    serving bowls.

    BOB'S NOTE:
    [1] This is a bit unusual: Tomato juice extracted this way bears only a very
    faint resemblance to the cooked tomato juice which comes in cans. I very
    strongly recommend making the recipe as described, rather than using canned
    tomato juice.


    Bob




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