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Thread: Toasting Salt

  1. #1
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Toasting Salt

    Recipes for Salt and Pepper Squid say to toast sea salt until it
    starts to darken.

    I tried that and it doesn't darken. It just gets really, really hot
    and starts to explode violently.

    Would it be the impurities it the sea salt that would presumably
    cause it to darken? My brand of sea salt it cleaner than most (La
    Baleine).

    And would toasting salt really affect the flavor? I would think the
    impurities would just burn, which would have drastically different
    results (maybe good, probably bad) depending on where the salt came
    from.

    -sw

  2. #2
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Toasting Salt

    On Apr 4, 1:53*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > Recipes for Salt and Pepper Squid say to toast sea salt until it
    > starts to darken.
    >
    > I tried that and it doesn't darken. *It just gets really, really hot
    > and starts to explode violently.
    >
    > Would it be the impurities it the sea salt that would presumably
    > cause it to darken? *My brand of sea salt it cleaner than most (La
    > Baleine). *
    >
    > And would toasting salt really affect the flavor? *I would think the
    > impurities would just burn, which would have drastically different
    > results (maybe good, probably bad) depending on where the salt came
    > from.
    >

    It's just an unthinking recipe. I have ground Sichuan peppercorns and
    briefly pan toasted them for mixing with salt and that works.
    Penzey's sells "Szechuan pepper - salt Roasted" and that works even
    better. -aem


  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Toasting Salt

    aem <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Apr 4, 1:53*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    >> Recipes for Salt and Pepper Squid say to toast sea salt until it
    >> starts to darken.
    >>
    >> I tried that and it doesn't darken. *It just gets really, really hot
    >> and starts to explode violently.
    >>
    >> Would it be the impurities it the sea salt that would presumably
    >> cause it to darken? *My brand of sea salt it cleaner than most (La
    >> Baleine). *
    >>
    >> And would toasting salt really affect the flavor? *I would think the
    >> impurities would just burn, which would have drastically different
    >> results (maybe good, probably bad) depending on where the salt came
    >> from.
    >>

    > It's just an unthinking recipe.


    Unthinking recipe? Not sure what that means, but many of the
    recipes I've read called for toasting the salt. Some separately
    from the pepper (which seems right since you might burn your spices
    waiting for the salt to turn).

    Salt and pepper squid isn't the only recipe I've seen that called
    for toasting salt.

    > Penzey's sells "Szechuan pepper - salt Roasted" and that works even
    > better. -aem


    I prefer my peppercorns to be already split by roasting as this cuts
    down on the grit by 99%. My teeth really feel the grit. I assume
    that's what Penzey's has done.

    -sw

  4. #4
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Toasting Salt

    Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    > Would it be the impurities it the sea salt that would
    > presumably cause it to darken? My brand of sea salt it
    > cleaner than most (La Baleine).


    What else could it be? Pure sodium chloride won't be
    affected by any temperature you can reach in your
    kitchen. (Perhaps not my kitchen, but I've got stuff
    I bought off eBay that can vaporize salt. :-)

    > And would toasting salt really affect the flavor?
    > I would think the impurities would just burn, which would
    > have drastically different results (maybe good, probably bad)
    > depending on where the salt came from.


    If it's got those impurities, roasting is good.
    The impurities may include untreated sewage,
    which is better roasted.

  5. #5
    Mark A.Meggs Guest

    Default Re: Toasting Salt

    On Fri, 4 Apr 2008 16:53:54 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Recipes for Salt and Pepper Squid say to toast sea salt until it
    >starts to darken.
    >
    >I tried that and it doesn't darken. It just gets really, really hot
    >and starts to explode violently.
    >
    >Would it be the impurities it the sea salt that would presumably
    >cause it to darken? My brand of sea salt it cleaner than most (La
    >Baleine).
    >
    >And would toasting salt really affect the flavor? I would think the
    >impurities would just burn, which would have drastically different
    >results (maybe good, probably bad) depending on where the salt came
    >from.
    >
    >-sw


    Some sea salts, like fleur de sel aren't really cleaned before they
    are packaged. They may have a little mud, algae, bacteria, etc. still
    sticking to the salt. These things are said to add flavor - toasting
    would probably alter that flavor. There can't be a lot there because
    to be sold as salt in the US, it has to have a certain amount of
    sodium chloride - 97%?

    - Mark

  6. #6
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Toasting Salt


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Recipes for Salt and Pepper Squid say to toast sea salt until it
    > starts to darken.
    >
    > I tried that and it doesn't darken. It just gets really, really hot
    > and starts to explode violently.
    >



    lol

    I'm picturing this.



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    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Toasting Salt

    On Fri, 4 Apr 2008 16:53:54 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Recipes for Salt and Pepper Squid say to toast sea salt until it
    >starts to darken.
    >
    >I tried that and it doesn't darken. It just gets really, really hot
    >and starts to explode violently.
    >
    >Would it be the impurities it the sea salt that would presumably
    >cause it to darken? My brand of sea salt it cleaner than most (La
    >Baleine).
    >
    >And would toasting salt really affect the flavor? I would think the
    >impurities would just burn, which would have drastically different
    >results (maybe good, probably bad) depending on where the salt came
    >from.
    >

    I can't imagine anyone trying to brown salt in a pan the way they'd
    brown bread crumbs or seeds.

    Maybe the salt your recipes tried to replicate was black salt or some
    other similarly colored salt.


    --
    See return address to reply by email
    remove the smile first

  8. #8
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Toasting Salt

    "Mark A.Meggs" wrote:
    >
    > Some sea salts, like fleur de sel aren't really cleaned before they
    > are packaged. They may have a little mud, algae, bacteria, etc. still
    > sticking to the salt. These things are said to add flavor - toasting
    > would probably alter that flavor. There can't be a lot there because
    > to be sold as salt in the US, it has to have a certain amount of
    > sodium chloride - 97%?


    Would that the other 3% were as benign as
    algae and mud. Where do you think the stuff
    goes when people in France flush their toilets?

  9. #9
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Toasting Salt

    "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]..

    > Would that the other 3% were as benign as
    > algae and mud. Where do you think the stuff
    > goes when people in France flush their toilets?


    Not to Brittany where fler de sel is farmed. The infamous sewage spills
    were in Marseilles and some time ago. The EU had made a big difference in
    ecological matters.



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