Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Toasted sesame oil

  1. #1
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Toasted sesame oil

    A recipe calls for it. How different is this from regular sesame
    oil? Or does it imply that the oil should be heated to a certain
    stage?


  2. #2
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: Toasted sesame oil


    "Kalmia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    |A recipe calls for it. How different is this from regular sesame
    | oil? Or does it imply that the oil should be heated to a certain
    | stage?

    Night and day difference. Think roasted peanuts vs. raw ones.
    Much deeper flavor, more savory, more umami. They would be
    used the same way, but I've never known why one would buy
    unroasted/untoasted sesame oil. Of course, ymmv.

    pavane



  3. #3
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Toasted sesame oil

    "pavane" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Kalmia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >|A recipe calls for it. How different is this from regular sesame
    >| oil? Or does it imply that the oil should be heated to a certain
    >| stage?
    >
    >Night and day difference. Think roasted peanuts vs. raw ones.
    >Much deeper flavor, more savory, more umami. They would be
    >used the same way, but I've never known why one would buy
    >unroasted/untoasted sesame oil. Of course, ymmv.


    Mine does.<g> The toasted is just *too* strong for me. I find the
    untoasted much more subtle.

    We do agree, that the difference is night and day. [I don't care
    for EVOO, either, though I like Olive oil.]

    Jim


  4. #4
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Toasted sesame oil

    Kalmia <[email protected]> wrote:

    > A recipe calls for it. How different is this from regular sesame
    > oil? Or does it imply that the oil should be heated to a certain
    > stage?


    Regular sesame oil has a relativley not very assertive taste and aroma
    and is used as a cooking oil in Central Asian and Far Eastern cuisines.
    Tasted sesame oil has a very strong taste and tends to be used as a
    flavouring by the teaspoon or even by the drop. An extra drop can
    sometimes be too much and spoil the dish.

    Victor

  5. #5
    Kswck Guest

    Default Re: Toasted sesame oil


    "Kalmia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >A recipe calls for it. How different is this from regular sesame
    > oil? Or does it imply that the oil should be heated to a certain
    > stage?
    >


    http://boyajianinc.com/asian.html#toasted




  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Toasted sesame oil

    On Fri, 13 May 2011 17:05:06 -0400, "pavane"
    <pavane@s[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "Kalmia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > |A recipe calls for it. How different is this from regular sesame
    > | oil? Or does it imply that the oil should be heated to a certain
    > | stage?
    >
    > Night and day difference. Think roasted peanuts vs. raw ones.
    > Much deeper flavor, more savory, more umami. They would be
    > used the same way, but I've never known why one would buy
    > unroasted/untoasted sesame oil. Of course, ymmv.
    >

    I thought it was all toasted... is there a cooking oil that's sesame?

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Toasted sesame oil

    On Fri, 13 May 2011 17:11:31 -0400, Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > "pavane" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Kalmia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]...
    > >|A recipe calls for it. How different is this from regular sesame
    > >| oil? Or does it imply that the oil should be heated to a certain
    > >| stage?
    > >
    > >Night and day difference. Think roasted peanuts vs. raw ones.
    > >Much deeper flavor, more savory, more umami. They would be
    > >used the same way, but I've never known why one would buy
    > >unroasted/untoasted sesame oil. Of course, ymmv.

    >
    > Mine does.<g> The toasted is just *too* strong for me. I find the
    > untoasted much more subtle.


    Toasted sesame oil is used in drops, not mass quantity.
    >
    > We do agree, that the difference is night and day. [I don't care
    > for EVOO, either, though I like Olive oil.]
    >

    Okay, you have a problem.



    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  8. #8
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Toasted sesame oil

    On 5/13/2011 5:56 PM, Victor Sack wrote:
    > Kalmia<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> A recipe calls for it. How different is this from regular sesame
    >> oil? Or does it imply that the oil should be heated to a certain
    >> stage?

    >
    > Regular sesame oil has a relativley not very assertive taste and aroma
    > and is used as a cooking oil in Central Asian and Far Eastern cuisines.
    > Tasted sesame oil has a very strong taste and tends to be used as a
    > flavouring by the teaspoon or even by the drop. An extra drop can
    > sometimes be too much and spoil the dish.
    >

    I've absolutely never regretted using *two* drops of toasted sesame oil
    in dishes that I cook for myself and where it is appropriate. I also put
    a couple of drops into the hummus that I make without tahini.
    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    I'm *not* [email protected]

  9. #9
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Toasted sesame oil

    On May 13, 8:04*pm, James Silverton <not.jim.silver...@verizon.net>
    wrote:
    > On 5/13/2011 5:56 PM, Victor Sack wrote:> Kalmia<tweeny90...@mypacks.net>*wrote:
    >
    > >> A recipe calls for it. *How different is this from regular sesame
    > >> oil? *Or does it imply that the oil should be heated to a certain
    > >> stage?

    >
    > > Regular sesame oil has a relativley not very assertive taste and aroma
    > > and is used as a cooking oil in Central Asian and Far Eastern cuisines.
    > > Tasted sesame oil has a very strong taste and tends to be used as a
    > > flavouring by the teaspoon or even by the drop. *An extra drop can
    > > sometimes be too much and spoil the dish.

    >
    > I've absolutely never regretted using *two* drops of toasted sesame oil
    > in dishes that I cook for myself and where it is appropriate. I also put
    > a couple of drops into the hummus that I make without tahini.
    > --
    >
    > James Silverton, Potomac
    >
    > I'm *not* not.jim.silver...@verizon.net


    Is it that readily found in most grocery stores, or do I have to find
    a specialty shop?

  10. #10
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Toasted sesame oil

    On 5/13/2011 8:59 PM, Kalmia wrote:
    > On May 13, 8:04 pm, James Silverton<not.jim.silver...@verizon.net>
    > wrote:
    >> On 5/13/2011 5:56 PM, Victor Sack wrote:> Kalmia<tweeny90...@mypacks.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>>> A recipe calls for it. How different is this from regular sesame
    >>>> oil? Or does it imply that the oil should be heated to a certain
    >>>> stage?

    >>
    >>> Regular sesame oil has a relativley not very assertive taste and aroma
    >>> and is used as a cooking oil in Central Asian and Far Eastern cuisines.
    >>> Tasted sesame oil has a very strong taste and tends to be used as a
    >>> flavouring by the teaspoon or even by the drop. An extra drop can
    >>> sometimes be too much and spoil the dish.

    >>
    >> I've absolutely never regretted using *two* drops of toasted sesame oil
    >> in dishes that I cook for myself and where it is appropriate. I also put
    >> a couple of drops into the hummus that I make without tahini.
    >> --
    >>
    >> James Silverton, Potomac
    >>
    >> I'm *not* not.jim.silver...@verizon.net

    >
    > Is it that readily found in most grocery stores, or do I have to find
    > a specialty shop?


    The local supermarkets tend to have an "oriental" section and I've only
    seen *toasted* sesame oil there.

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    I'm *not* [email protected]

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Toasted sesame oil

    On Fri, 13 May 2011 17:59:01 -0700 (PDT), Kalmia
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Is it that readily found in most grocery stores, or do I have to find
    > a specialty shop?


    Try your grocery store first. You may be pleasantly surprised.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  12. #12
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Toasted sesame oil

    On Fri, 13 May 2011 20:04:49 -0400, James Silverton
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 5/13/2011 5:56 PM, Victor Sack wrote:
    >> Kalmia<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> A recipe calls for it. How different is this from regular sesame
    >>> oil? Or does it imply that the oil should be heated to a certain
    >>> stage?

    >>
    >> Regular sesame oil has a relativley not very assertive taste and aroma
    >> and is used as a cooking oil in Central Asian and Far Eastern cuisines.
    >> Tasted sesame oil has a very strong taste and tends to be used as a
    >> flavouring by the teaspoon or even by the drop. An extra drop can
    >> sometimes be too much and spoil the dish.
    >>

    >I've absolutely never regretted using *two* drops of toasted sesame oil
    >in dishes that I cook for myself and where it is appropriate. I also put
    >a couple of drops into the hummus that I make without tahini.


    Toasted sesame seed oil should be added at the very end of cooking...
    it's a condiment... the fact that it's typically packaged in tiny
    bottles that deliver by drops like hot sauce should be clue enough. An
    extra drop or three won't hurt but is just wasteful... however too
    much can indeed negatively affect the dish by over powering the
    flavors of other subtley flavored ingredients like vegetables and mild
    flavored meats like pork, chicken and shellfish. Like vanilla and
    saffron toasted sesame seed oil is another ingredient where less is
    more. It's also best to purchase the smallest size as toasted sesame
    seed oil begins to go rancid in about a year... you may want to
    consider keeping it in the fridge but away from dairy.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32