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Thread: That time of year to preserve..

  1. #1
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default That time of year to preserve..

    Okay folks,

    Especially those that do some preserving.

    I am thinking of trying to preserve some stuff for Christmas gifts
    this year. I know a lot of you already do this.

    What are your favorites?

    I am thinking that bread and butter pickles might be a good choice:
    Edrena brought some to the cook-in last year that were incredibly
    good. I want her recipe. Edrena????

    I am thinking some sort of preserves too.... Jams.... I just saw
    pomegranates in the market today,so I know fall isn't far off. Have
    any of you done anything with those?

    I don't want big batches of stuff. I have some of Barb Schaller's
    recipes on my laptop, so I may look at those. And I have the recipe
    that Tammy uses...that she gives for gifts.

    You folks got anything special? I am not giving to the whole world,
    but would love to give some choice items to my adopted family here,
    and maybe a few other folks.

    Christine

  2. #2
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..

    On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 21:14:15 -0500, "Gregory Morrow"
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >One thing that always got accolades around Christmas was pickled asparagus
    >with slivers of red bell pepper...very "Christmas - ey" and simple to do...I
    >did these in pint jars.
    >
    >'Course asparagus season is somewhat past but it's an idea...
    >
    >Brandied cherries were another much - appreciated gift...
    >
    >Cranberry conserves are another idea...also corn relish and picallilli.


    Well, it's late for some of those things, as you know...I like to do
    stuff in season.

    How did the corn relish go over? Corn is just starting to come in
    here....

    And how about the picalililli?

    Good ideas....

    Thanks Greg!! Let me know if you have more. I am thinking of pairing
    whatever I make, with some artisan bread....hence that leads me to
    think of jam...or preserves..

    Tammy has the corner on cranberry conserves..but I might steal it
    from her...

    Christine

  3. #3
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..


    Christine Dabney wrote:

    > Okay folks,
    >
    > Especially those that do some preserving.
    >
    > I am thinking of trying to preserve some stuff for Christmas gifts
    > this year. I know a lot of you already do this.
    >
    > What are your favorites?
    >
    > I am thinking that bread and butter pickles might be a good choice:
    > Edrena brought some to the cook-in last year that were incredibly
    > good. I want her recipe. Edrena????
    >
    > I am thinking some sort of preserves too.... Jams.... I just saw
    > pomegranates in the market today,so I know fall isn't far off. Have
    > any of you done anything with those?
    >
    > I don't want big batches of stuff. I have some of Barb Schaller's
    > recipes on my laptop, so I may look at those. And I have the recipe
    > that Tammy uses...that she gives for gifts.
    >
    > You folks got anything special? I am not giving to the whole world,
    > but would love to give some choice items to my adopted family here,
    > and maybe a few other folks.



    One thing that always got accolades around Christmas was pickled asparagus
    with slivers of red bell pepper...very "Christmas - ey" and simple to do...I
    did these in pint jars.

    'Course asparagus season is somewhat past but it's an idea...

    Brandied cherries were another much - appreciated gift...

    Cranberry conserves are another idea...also corn relish and picallilli.


    --
    Best
    Greg



  4. #4
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..

    Christine Dabney wrote:
    > Okay folks,
    >
    > Especially those that do some preserving.
    >
    > I am thinking of trying to preserve some stuff for Christmas gifts
    > this year. I know a lot of you already do this.


    >
    > You folks got anything special? I am not giving to the whole world,
    > but would love to give some choice items to my adopted family here,
    > and maybe a few other folks.




    Chutney! Peach, nectarine or mango.

    When we lived back east where things grew reliably, I use to make
    gift baskets for Christmas gifts for relatives and elderly neighbors.
    They included chutney, jams, homemade bread and cookies. People loved them.

    gloria p

  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..

    On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 20:13:08 -0600, Christine Dabney
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 21:14:15 -0500, "Gregory Morrow"
    ><Fl[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>One thing that always got accolades around Christmas was pickled asparagus
    >>with slivers of red bell pepper...very "Christmas - ey" and simple to do...I
    >>did these in pint jars.
    >>
    >>'Course asparagus season is somewhat past but it's an idea...
    >>
    >>Brandied cherries were another much - appreciated gift...
    >>
    >>Cranberry conserves are another idea...also corn relish and picallilli.

    >
    >Well, it's late for some of those things, as you know...I like to do
    >stuff in season.
    >
    >How did the corn relish go over? Corn is just starting to come in
    >here....
    >
    >And how about the picalililli?
    >
    >Good ideas....
    >
    >Thanks Greg!! Let me know if you have more. I am thinking of pairing
    >whatever I make, with some artisan bread....hence that leads me to
    >think of jam...or preserves..
    >
    > Tammy has the corner on cranberry conserves..but I might steal it
    >from her...
    >

    I suggest you also include ways to use them. I wouldn't have a clue
    how to use corn relish or Piccadilly, but I would have no problem with
    any kind of cranberry.



    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..

    On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 21:39:52 -0600, Gloria P <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >They included chutney, jams, homemade bread and cookies. People loved them.


    Those who want for nothing (not saying they are rich, just that they
    have everything they want) are always appreciative of food gifts - if
    they aren't too esoteric.


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  7. #7
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..

    "Christine Dabney" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]..
    > Okay folks,
    >
    > Especially those that do some preserving.
    >
    > I am thinking of trying to preserve some stuff for Christmas gifts
    > this year. I know a lot of you already do this.
    >
    > What are your favorites?
    > Christine


    I'm into the wild stuff this year. The blackberries are just starting so
    there aren't enough yet, but wild plums abound. Corniolo is due now, sloes
    as well, and elderberry is now or never. This year I've made elderberry
    vinegar because it is stunningly beautiful. I think it's better than that
    fake balsamico people use.
    I made quite a lot of caramelized fig and lemon conserve but the next figs
    are a month away.
    I will make some new things from blackberry this year. I've a Britiah book
    that has a much wider variety of things to do, some very spiced and
    interesting.



  8. #8
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..

    On Aug 12, 8:38*pm, Christine Dabney <artis...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
    > Okay folks,
    >
    > Especially those that do some preserving. *
    >
    > I am thinking of trying to preserve some stuff for Christmas gifts
    > this year. *I know a lot of you already do this. *
    >
    > What are your favorites? *
    >
    > I am thinking that bread and butter pickles might be a good choice:
    > Edrena brought some to the cook-in last year that were incredibly
    > good. * I want her recipe. *Edrena????
    >
    > I am thinking some sort of preserves too.... *Jams.... *I just saw
    > pomegranates in the market today,so I know fall isn't far off. *Have
    > any of you done anything with those?
    >
    > I don't want big batches of stuff. *I have some of Barb Schaller's
    > recipes on my laptop, so I may look at those. *And I have the recipe
    > that Tammy uses...that she gives for gifts. *
    >
    > You folks got anything special? * I am not giving to the whole world,
    > but would love to give some choice items to my adopted family here,
    > and maybe a few other folks.
    >
    > Christine


    I tell ya, B & B pickles are dead easy and don't make a mess in the
    kitchen. Go for it. One year, I put them up in those small decorate
    jelly jars. There are some good software sources for making round jar-
    top labels, or other kinds.

    I'm making sweet pickles - every time, I say never again, because I
    can't make a small batch, what's the point, so I fill up my 4-gallon
    crock, and then the whole kitchen is sticky by the end of the 2
    weeks. Oh, well, at least I'm the only one there ... and I keep
    saying, "It will be clean, it will be clean, it will be clean ...."

    N.

  9. #9
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..


    Christine Dabney wrote:

    > On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 21:14:15 -0500, "Gregory Morrow"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > >One thing that always got accolades around Christmas was pickled

    asparagus
    > >with slivers of red bell pepper...very "Christmas - ey" and simple to

    do...I
    > >did these in pint jars.
    > >
    > >'Course asparagus season is somewhat past but it's an idea...
    > >
    > >Brandied cherries were another much - appreciated gift...
    > >
    > >Cranberry conserves are another idea...also corn relish and picallilli.

    >
    > Well, it's late for some of those things, as you know...I like to do
    > stuff in season.
    >
    > How did the corn relish go over? Corn is just starting to come in
    > here....
    >
    > And how about the picalililli?



    Both were made using the basic recipes, IIRC from _The Ball Blue Book_.
    Both are easy to make and can be made from even stupormarket ingredients if
    need be...and IMO putting up stuff in pint jars is less arduous than doing
    quarts of things.

    Hmmm...in fact I see that sweet corn, pickling cukes, bell peppers, etc. are
    on sale for pretty low prices at my store, maybe I'll put a few pints by
    this weekend (weather is very cool for August in Chicawgo). I have all the
    canning equipment and even boxes of virgin Ball jars in the closet, might as
    well use 'em (have not canned for years now). This stuff is simple to make.
    And I am already squirreling away gifts for the upcoming birthday/holiday
    season...

    And that l'il "ping" sound that jars make when they are taken outta the
    water bath is one of the quitessential "sounds of summer", very nostalgic...


    > Good ideas....
    >
    > Thanks Greg!! Let me know if you have more. I am thinking of pairing
    > whatever I make, with some artisan bread....hence that leads me to
    > think of jam...or preserves..



    Now that's a good idea, I think I'll do that too. People like my bread and
    you can't believe how THRILLED folks are to receive home - canned victuals.
    Most of my friends are from rural places like Iowa anyways and this stuff
    reminds them of home...

    I can't believe the exorbitant prices places charge for little "designer"
    jars of picallilli or relishes or whatever...peeps appreciate ho' - made
    stuff better in any case, e.g. "You MADE this...!!!???".



    > Tammy has the corner on cranberry conserves..but I might steal it
    > from her...



    I like cranberry conserves made with brandy and some sorta nuts, e.g. pecans
    or almonds. Very easy to make. I'll be doing a few jars of this come
    November...


    --
    Best
    Greg



  10. #10
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..


    <sf> wrote:

    > On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 21:39:52 -0600, Gloria P <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >They included chutney, jams, homemade bread and cookies. People loved

    them.
    >
    > Those who want for nothing (not saying they are rich, just that they
    > have everything they want) are always appreciative of food gifts - if
    > they aren't too esoteric.



    Granny Clampett of _The Beverly Hillbillies_ always gave food gifts at
    Christmas. Her gift packages included stuff like pickled hawk eggs, raccoon
    relish, and smoked owl...Mrs. Drysdale was not real appreciative, lol...


    --
    Best
    Greg




  11. #11
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..

    On Aug 13, 2:58*pm, "Gregory Morrow"
    <FlyPrahaJakartaByTU104...@flyokayflycsa.cz> wrote:
    > Christine Dabney wrote:
    > > On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 21:14:15 -0500, "Gregory Morrow"
    > > <FlyPrahaJakartaByTU104...@flyokayflycsa.cz> wrote:

    >
    > > >One thing that always got accolades around Christmas was pickled

    > asparagus
    > > >with slivers of red bell pepper...very "Christmas - ey" and simple to

    > do...I
    > > >did these in pint jars.

    >
    > > >'Course asparagus season is somewhat past but it's an idea...

    >
    > > >Brandied cherries were another much - appreciated gift...

    >
    > > >Cranberry conserves are another idea...also corn relish and picallilli..

    >
    > > Well, it's late for some of those things, as you know...I like to do
    > > stuff in season.

    >
    > > How did the corn relish go over? *Corn is just starting to come in
    > > here....

    >
    > > And how about the picalililli?

    >
    > Both were made using the basic recipes, IIRC from _The Ball Blue Book_.
    > Both are easy to make and can be made from even stupormarket ingredients if
    > need be...and IMO putting up stuff in pint jars is less arduous than doing
    > quarts of things.
    >
    > Hmmm...in fact I see that sweet corn, pickling cukes, bell peppers, etc. are
    > on sale for pretty low prices at my store, maybe I'll put a few pints by
    > this weekend (weather is very cool for August in Chicawgo). *I have allthe
    > canning equipment and even boxes of virgin Ball jars in the closet, mightas
    > well use 'em (have not canned for years now). *This stuff is simple to make.
    > And I am already squirreling away gifts for the upcoming birthday/holiday
    > season...
    >
    > And that l'il "ping" sound that jars make when they are taken outta the
    > water bath is one of the quitessential "sounds of summer", very nostalgic....
    >
    > > Good ideas....

    >
    > > Thanks Greg!! * Let me know if you have more. I am thinking of pairing
    > > whatever I make, with some artisan bread....hence that leads me to
    > > think of jam...or preserves..

    >
    > Now that's a good idea, I think I'll do that too. *People like my breadand
    > you can't believe how THRILLED folks are to receive home - canned victuals.
    > Most of my friends are from rural places like Iowa anyways and this stuff
    > reminds them of home...
    >
    > I can't believe the exorbitant prices places charge for little "designer"
    > jars of picallilli or relishes or whatever...peeps appreciate ho' - made
    > stuff better in any case, e.g. "You MADE this...!!!???".
    >
    > > *Tammy has the corner on cranberry conserves..but I might steal it
    > > from her...

    >
    > I like cranberry conserves made with brandy and some sorta nuts, e.g. pecans
    > or almonds. *Very easy to make. *I'll be doing a few jars of this come
    > November...
    >
    > --
    > Best
    > Greg- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    My Blue Book cost 35 cents, new. I bought it that long ago. ;-)
    Still works for me.

    N.

  12. #12
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 21:14:15 -0500, "Gregory Morrow"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > >One thing that always got accolades around Christmas was pickled asparagus
    > >with slivers of red bell pepper...very "Christmas - ey" and simple to do...I
    > >did these in pint jars.
    > >
    > >'Course asparagus season is somewhat past but it's an idea...
    > >
    > >Brandied cherries were another much - appreciated gift...
    > >
    > >Cranberry conserves are another idea...also corn relish and picallilli.

    >
    > Well, it's late for some of those things, as you know...I like to do
    > stuff in season.
    >
    > How did the corn relish go over? Corn is just starting to come in
    > here....


    I've got a pretty good corn relish recipe. . . . procedural pics are
    on my website (link below) in the blahblahblog area. Particulars can be
    found online if you use my name with it. Oh, heck -- here you go:

    Corn Relish
    Barb Schaller
    Minnesota State Fair "Prestigious Processor of the Pantry", 2004, 2006.

    10 large tender ears of corn
    1 green pepper minced
    1/2 red pepper minced (1/2 to 1)
    1 large yellow onion minced
    2 teaspoons salt
    3/4 teaspoon celery seeds
    1 1/4 teaspoons dry mustard
    1 1/3 cups cider vinegar
    1 cup sugar
    1/2 teaspoon turmeric
    Cut corn kernels from cobs. Combine the corn kernels with remaining
    ingredients in a large pot and bring to a boil. Turn heat to low and
    simmer for a half hour. Pour into hot, sterilized preserving jars,
    cover, and seal. Process in a boiling water bath for 20 minutes.
    Yield: About 4-6 pints.
    ----------
    Notes: Put them in half pint jars if you wish; use same processing
    time. State Fair Blue Ribbon Winner, 1983-84, 1986-87, 1990, 1994,
    2001, 2006. Take that!
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.mac.com/barbschaller , blahblahblog is back and
    is being updated quite regularly now, most recently 8-12-2008.
    "rec.food.cooking Preserved Fruit Administrator
    'Always in a jam. Never in a stew.'" - Evergene

  13. #13
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..

    On Aug 13, 4:08*pm, Melba's Jammin' <barbschal...@earthlink.net>
    wrote:
    > In article <qjg4a45smjm2sa5ps6c7qj8j8m1rraa...@4ax.com>,
    > *Christine Dabney <artis...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 21:14:15 -0500, "Gregory Morrow"
    > > <FlyPrahaJakartaByTU104...@flyokayflycsa.cz> wrote:

    >
    > > >One thing that always got accolades around Christmas was pickled asparagus
    > > >with slivers of red bell pepper...very "Christmas - ey" and simple to do...I
    > > >did these in pint jars.

    >
    > > >'Course asparagus season is somewhat past but it's an idea...

    >
    > > >Brandied cherries were another much - appreciated gift...

    >
    > > >Cranberry conserves are another idea...also corn relish and picallilli..

    >
    > > Well, it's late for some of those things, as you know...I like to do
    > > stuff in season. *

    >
    > > How did the corn relish go over? *Corn is just starting to come in
    > > here....

    >
    > I've got a pretty good corn relish recipe. . . . * procedural pics are
    > on my website (link below) in the blahblahblog area. *Particulars can be
    > found online if you use my name with it. * Oh, heck -- here you go:
    >
    > Corn Relish
    > Barb Schaller
    > Minnesota State Fair "Prestigious Processor of the Pantry", 2004, 2006.
    >
    > 10 large tender ears of corn
    > 1 green pepper *minced
    > 1/2 *red pepper *minced (1/2 to 1)
    > 1 *large yellow onion minced
    > 2 *teaspoons salt
    > 3/4 * teaspoon celery seeds
    > 1 1/4 teaspoons dry mustard
    > 1 1/3 cups *cider vinegar
    > 1 *cup * sugar
    > 1/2 * teaspoon turmeric
    > Cut corn kernels from cobs. *Combine the corn kernels with remaining
    > ingredients in a *large pot and bring to a boil. *Turn heat to low and
    > simmer for a half hour. *Pour into hot, sterilized preserving jars,
    > cover, and seal. *Process in a boiling water bath for 20 minutes.
    > Yield: *About 4-6 pints.
    > * * ----------
    > Notes: * Put them in half pint jars if you wish; use same processing
    > time. *State Fair Blue Ribbon Winner, 1983-84, 1986-87, 1990, 1994,
    > 2001, 2006. * *Take that!
    > --
    > -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJhttp://web.mac.com/barbschaller, blahblahblog is back and
    > is being updated quite regularly now, most recently 8-12-2008.
    > "rec.food.cooking Preserved Fruit Administrator
    > 'Always in a jam. *Never in a stew.'" *- Evergene


    =================================================

    Can you cut the recipe in half and store the stuff in the
    refrigerator? (Just for a couple of days or so?)
    Lynn in Fargo


  14. #14
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..

    Nancy2 wrote:

    > I tell ya, B & B pickles are dead easy and don't make a mess in the
    > kitchen. Go for it. One year, I put them up in those small decorate
    > jelly jars. There are some good software sources for making round jar-
    > top labels, or other kinds.
    >
    > I'm making sweet pickles - every time, I say never again, because I
    > can't make a small batch, what's the point, so I fill up my 4-gallon
    > crock, and then the whole kitchen is sticky by the end of the 2
    > weeks. Oh, well, at least I'm the only one there ... and I keep
    > saying, "It will be clean, it will be clean, it will be clean ...."
    >
    > N.


    Canning can be a PITA, but we keep doing it. :+

    If you make sweet pickles, and you are feeling adventurous, add some
    whole serranos or jalapenos. Your pickles will be hot & sweet.

    This is how I do it, but you should do it your way, I was just
    experimenting (I got pregnant that way once). You boil the sugar,
    vinegar and peppers for 10 minutes, then you add your spices and proceed
    with your recipe. You remove the peppers before you add the pickles into
    the jars.

    These pickles are my favorite. I made some for a family reunion and
    people went nuts over them. My sister makes them now, so my kitchen
    remains non-sticky.

    Becca

  15. #15
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..


    Lynn from Fargo wrote:

    On Aug 13, 4:08 pm, Melba's Jammin' <barbschal...@earthlink.net>
    wrote:
    > In article <qjg4a45smjm2sa5ps6c7qj8j8m1rraa...@4ax.com>,
    > Christine Dabney <artis...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 21:14:15 -0500, "Gregory Morrow"
    > > <FlyPrahaJakartaByTU104...@flyokayflycsa.cz> wrote:

    >
    > > >One thing that always got accolades around Christmas was pickled

    asparagus
    > > >with slivers of red bell pepper...very "Christmas - ey" and simple to

    do...I
    > > >did these in pint jars.

    >
    > > >'Course asparagus season is somewhat past but it's an idea...

    >
    > > >Brandied cherries were another much - appreciated gift...

    >
    > > >Cranberry conserves are another idea...also corn relish and picallilli.

    >
    > > Well, it's late for some of those things, as you know...I like to do
    > > stuff in season.

    >
    > > How did the corn relish go over? Corn is just starting to come in
    > > here....

    >
    > I've got a pretty good corn relish recipe. . . . procedural pics are
    > on my website (link below) in the blahblahblog area. Particulars can be
    > found online if you use my name with it. Oh, heck -- here you go:
    >
    > Corn Relish
    > Barb Schaller
    > Minnesota State Fair "Prestigious Processor of the Pantry", 2004, 2006.
    >
    > 10 large tender ears of corn
    > 1 green pepper minced
    > 1/2 red pepper minced (1/2 to 1)
    > 1 large yellow onion minced
    > 2 teaspoons salt
    > 3/4 teaspoon celery seeds
    > 1 1/4 teaspoons dry mustard
    > 1 1/3 cups cider vinegar
    > 1 cup sugar
    > 1/2 teaspoon turmeric
    > Cut corn kernels from cobs. Combine the corn kernels with remaining
    > ingredients in a large pot and bring to a boil. Turn heat to low and
    > simmer for a half hour. Pour into hot, sterilized preserving jars,
    > cover, and seal. Process in a boiling water bath for 20 minutes.
    > Yield: About 4-6 pints.
    > ----------
    > Notes: Put them in half pint jars if you wish; use same processing
    > time. State Fair Blue Ribbon Winner, 1983-84, 1986-87, 1990, 1994,
    > 2001, 2006. Take that!
    > --
    > -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJhttp://web.mac.com/barbschaller,

    blahblahblog is back and
    > is being updated quite regularly now, most recently 8-12-2008.
    > "rec.food.cooking Preserved Fruit Administrator
    > 'Always in a jam. Never in a stew.'" - Evergene


    =================================================

    Can you cut the recipe in half and store the stuff in the
    refrigerator? (Just for a couple of days or so?)
    Lynn in Fargo
    -----------------------

    GM replies:

    Sure ya can...


    --
    Best
    Greg




  16. #16
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..

    On Thu, 14 Aug 2008 10:56:24 -0500, Becca <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >These pickles are my favorite. I made some for a family reunion and
    >people went nuts over them. My sister makes them now, so my kitchen
    >remains non-sticky.
    >
    >Becca



    Okay, it looks like bread and butter pickles are one way to go. I
    can find the small pickling cucumbers at one market I frequent, so I
    will get me some of those.

    Christine

  17. #17
    Blinky the Shark Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..

    Christine Dabney wrote:

    > On Thu, 14 Aug 2008 10:56:24 -0500, Becca <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >>These pickles are my favorite. I made some for a family reunion and
    >>people went nuts over them. My sister makes them now, so my kitchen
    >>remains non-sticky.
    >>
    >>Becca

    >
    >
    > Okay, it looks like bread and butter pickles are one way to go. I
    > can find the small pickling cucumbers at one market I frequent, so I
    > will get me some of those.


    Mmmmmmm.....bread and butter pickles.

    Bubbies.

    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
    Need a new news feed? http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html


  18. #18
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Lynn from Fargo <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Aug 13, 4:08*pm, Melba's Jammin' <barbschal...@earthlink.net>
    > wrote:


    > > I've got a pretty good corn relish recipe. . . . * procedural pics are
    > > on my website (link below) in the blahblahblog area. *Particulars can be
    > > found online if you use my name with it. * Oh, heck -- here you go:
    > >
    > > Corn Relish
    > > Barb Schaller

    (particulars snipped)
    >
    > =================================================
    >
    > Can you cut the recipe in half and store the stuff in the
    > refrigerator? (Just for a couple of days or so?)
    > Lynn in Fargo


    You bet! I think maybe Michael Lonergan has done that. Put it in a
    sterile glass jar, keep a tasting spoon out of it and it will keep a
    long time.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.mac.com/barbschaller, blahblahblog is back and
    most recently updated last night, 8-14-2008 after the Taste of the Fair.
    Check it out a good story.
    "rec.food.cooking Preserved Fruit Administrator
    'Always in a jam. Never in a stew.'" - Evergene

  19. #19
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Thu, 14 Aug 2008 10:56:24 -0500, Becca <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    > >These pickles are my favorite. I made some for a family reunion and
    > >people went nuts over them. My sister makes them now, so my kitchen
    > >remains non-sticky.
    > >
    > >Becca

    >
    >
    > Okay, it looks like bread and butter pickles are one way to go. I
    > can find the small pickling cucumbers at one market I frequent, so I
    > will get me some of those.
    >
    > Christine


    I don't know if you've done this before--no insults to your ability
    intended:
    For B&B's you want a cuke that's about 1-1/2" diameter. Have you looked
    at my pics of the process? A quick run in the clotheswasher with a
    couple old towels is easier than scrubbing them. Trim the blossom end
    about 1/16" inch. I think the standard slicing disk with the
    Cuisinart fp is 4 mm. That's an okay thickness but I do them thinner
    than that. FWIW.
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.mac.com/barbschaller, blahblahblog is back and
    most recently updated last night, 8-14-2008 after the Taste of the Fair.
    Check it out -- a good story.
    "rec.food.cooking Preserved Fruit Administrator
    'Always in a jam. Never in a stew.'" - Evergene

  20. #20
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: That time of year to preserve..

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Lynn from Fargo <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Aug 13, 4:08 pm, Melba's Jammin' <barbschal...@earthlink.net>
    >> wrote:

    >
    >>> I've got a pretty good corn relish recipe. . . . procedural pics are
    >>> on my website (link below) in the blahblahblog area. Particulars can be
    >>> found online if you use my name with it. Oh, heck -- here you go:
    >>>
    >>> Corn Relish
    >>> Barb Schaller

    > (particulars snipped)
    >> =================================================
    >>
    >> Can you cut the recipe in half and store the stuff in the
    >> refrigerator? (Just for a couple of days or so?)
    >> Lynn in Fargo

    >
    > You bet! I think maybe Michael Lonergan has done that. Put it in a
    > sterile glass jar, keep a tasting spoon out of it and it will keep a
    > long time.
    >

    Since you are the goddess... So, I have always been rather a
    coward when it comes to preserving, although I increasingly find
    myself thinking it might be a good thing to do--in conjunction
    with growing ones own produce or buying local organic produce.
    Can I do a small batch of anything, put it in sterile jars, not
    taste--or not use already used tasting spoon--and keep this in the
    fridge without getting into seals and such?

    --
    Jean B.

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