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Thread: Thrift shop observation...

  1. #81
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On Friday, October 5, 2012 1:35:18 AM UTC-5, projectile vomit chick wrote:
    > On Oct 4, 11:49*am, Bryan <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > On Wednesday, October 3, 2012 5:05:11 PM UTC-5, Nunya Bidnits wrote:

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > Bread machines are a dime a dozen in thrift stores. I think it's one of

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > those things that a lot of people think they would like to have, but only a

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > few actually take to it and use it regularly. The typical bread machine eats

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > up counter space while rarely if ever used, until someone finally reclaims

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > its spot and ships it off to Goodwill.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > This got me thinking. *I wonder if I could find a yogurt maker there.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > --Bryan

    >
    >
    >
    > Christonnacracker if yer that into it why can't you figure out how to
    >
    > make it yourself? Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh


    A yogurt maker keeps it at optimum temperature. Easy.

    --Bryan

  2. #82
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On Oct 5, 8:54*am, Bryan <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Friday, October 5, 2012 1:35:18 AM UTC-5, projectile vomit chick wrote:
    > > On Oct 4, 11:49*am, Bryan <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:

    >
    > > > On Wednesday, October 3, 2012 5:05:11 PM UTC-5, Nunya Bidnits wrote:

    >
    > > > > Bread machines are a dime a dozen in thrift stores. I think it's one of

    >
    > > > > those things that a lot of people think they would like to have, but only a

    >
    > > > > few actually take to it and use it regularly. The typical bread machine eats

    >
    > > > > up counter space while rarely if ever used, until someone finally reclaims

    >
    > > > > its spot and ships it off to Goodwill.

    >
    > > > This got me thinking. *I wonder if I could find a yogurt maker there.

    >
    > > > --Bryan

    >
    > > Christonnacracker if yer that into it why can't you figure out how to

    >
    > > make it yourself? * Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

    >
    > A yogurt maker keeps it at optimum temperature. *Easy.
    >
    > --Bryan


    True, but that can also be obtained other ways.

  3. #83
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    Bwrrrryan wrote:
    >projectile vomit chick wrote:
    >>
    >> Christonnacracker if yer that into it why can't you figure out how to
    >> make it yourself? Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

    >
    >A yogurt maker beeps at optimum temperature. Easy.


    Beeps like your gaydar! LOL

  4. #84
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On Friday, October 5, 2012 8:31:06 AM UTC-7, George M. Middius wrote:
    > Farm1 wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > But for those peeps like me, who as a confirmed, died in the wool

    >
    >
    >
    > Why make your burial shroud out of wool? Use polyester or nylon and
    >
    > donate some money to the poor.


    English is a funny language, but people understood her meaning.

    die, dies, died, dying
    dye, dyes, dyed, dyeing

  5. #85
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Kalmia <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I stopped into one in another town, on my never ending search to match some
    > old glasses. I noticed 4 or 5 clean, almost new bread machines of various
    > brands, for about 10 bucks each. Trying to forget that I paid 400 for mine
    > when they first came out, I wondered why they were there. Don't ppl like to
    > a. save money b. eat healthier, c. have decent bread. Maybe I'm the one
    > who is weird and eschew Wonder and its ilk. Are ppl lazy or what? At least
    > when mine dies, I know where to find plenty of cheap replacement choices.
    >
    > No glass, by the way.


    My guess is that someone simply decided that they could, after all, live
    without having one.

    My kid's husband had to have one. And after about 2 months regular use,
    he became bored with it. He isn't really interested in bread, he just
    wanted to have one because it's cool to have something that does it all
    for you with minimal investment of personal time.
    --
    Barb,
    http://www.barbschaller.com, as of August 20, 2012

  6. #86
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Kalmia <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I was in a Goodwill today - they seemed to have a lot of some kind of instant
    > sangwidge maker - hardly used - prob. Xmas gifts of yore. I noticed a couple
    > of bread machines there too - 7 bucks.
    >
    > BTW, lots of old tvs in these places. How DOES one get rid of an old tv?
    > Aren't there companies than mine certain elements from them?


    Take it to Best Buy. Pay $5 for them to take it and they'll give you a
    $5 gift card for their store in exchange.
    --
    Barb,
    http://www.barbschaller.com, as of August 20, 2012

  7. #87
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On Thursday, October 4, 2012 5:21:19 PM UTC-4, Dave Smith wrote:
    > On 04/10/2012 3:52 PM, Kalmia wrote:
    >
    > > On Wednesday, October 3, 2012 11:11:30 PM UTC-4, Dave Smith wrote:

    >
    > >

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> My mother used to make bread by hand at least once a week, more

    >
    > >> than a

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> dozen loaves at a time.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Wow - was she feeding an army, selling it, freezing it ahead, or just

    >
    > > had a houseful of breadophiles? I bet she was a terrific baker.

    >
    > > Takes years to get that good. I admire anyone who can turn out a

    >
    > > decent loaf from scratch.

    >
    > >

    >
    >
    >
    > There were four boys in the family. I think we went through a lot more
    >
    > bread when it was home made that when it was the commercial stuff, My
    >
    > father, having been raised on a (rabbit) farm was used to home made or
    >
    > bakery bread and hated the commercial stuff. It was a real treat to
    >
    > come home from school to the smell of freshly baked bread and my
    >
    > brothers and I often demolished at least one loaf as an after school
    >
    > snack. One of my sisters in law once commented that my brothers and I
    >
    > were the only people she knew who didn't get excited about bakery bread,
    >
    > having been used to home made.
    >
    >
    >
    >


    What kind of oven did she have - how many loaves did she bake at once - must've owned a lot of loaf pans, etc. I can't even begin to picture the process of making a dozen loaves at home from scratch. I'm sure it can be donetho by competent kitchen mavens. My gran reportedly made 9 apple pies once for a church bake sale.

  8. #88
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On Sat, 06 Oct 2012 10:19:41 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Kalmia <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I stopped into one in another town, on my never ending search to match some
    >> old glasses. I noticed 4 or 5 clean, almost new bread machines of various
    >> brands, for about 10 bucks each. Trying to forget that I paid 400 for mine
    >> when they first came out, I wondered why they were there. Don't ppl like to
    >> a. save money b. eat healthier, c. have decent bread. Maybe I'm the one
    >> who is weird and eschew Wonder and its ilk. Are ppl lazy or what? At least
    >> when mine dies, I know where to find plenty of cheap replacement choices.
    >>
    >> No glass, by the way.

    >
    >My guess is that someone simply decided that they could, after all, live
    >without having one.
    >
    >My kid's husband had to have one. And after about 2 months regular use,
    >he became bored with it. He isn't really interested in bread, he just
    >wanted to have one because it's cool to have something that does it all
    >for you with minimal investment of personal time.



    I bought a bread machine over 15 years ago. A Zoji. Great machine. I
    went to a lot of trouble to find exotic and interesting bread recipes
    and the machine never disappointed. In fact we liked the machine so
    much we got one for my father-in-law, who then baked all his own bread
    until he was almost 90, but I digress...

    The Zoji got me interested in bread making, so I branched out. I
    didn't abandon the Zoji because it was useless. It was a fabulous
    machine, but as I branched out all those years ago, the whole notion
    of making one's own breads was starting becoming popular, as was
    online hanging out on the Internet and my interest in Usenet groups,
    and then I found sourdough and that was it for the Zoji. I retired it
    to the basement, where it sat until my father-in-law had a problem
    with his machine after very serious and regular use, and we shipped
    it to him to end its days. It still works.

    But when I stopped using the Zoji, I needed to invest in a decent
    mixer (these were the days before stretch & fold became popular, and
    kneading was THE thing to do), so I still had a sizeable investment
    output.

    Most folks do not really like home baked breads. They are very much
    used to plain grocery store loaves and the very idea of slicing the
    damn thing by hand is anathema.

    Boron



  9. #89
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On Sat, 6 Oct 2012 08:47:48 -0700 (PDT), Kalmia
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >What kind of oven did she have - how many loaves did she bake at once - must've owned a lot
    >of loaf pans, etc. I can't even begin to picture the process of making a dozen loaves at home
    >from scratch. I'm sure it can be done tho by competent kitchen mavens. My gran reportedly
    >made 9 apple pies once for a church bake sale.


    I regularly make 8-10 lbs of bread at a time. I have loaf pans, but a
    lot of the baking is free form or brotform.

    Boron


  10. #90
    S Viemeister Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On 10/6/2012 11:47 AM, Kalmia wrote:

    > What kind of oven did she have - how many loaves did she bake at once - must've owned a lot of loaf pans, etc. I can't even begin to picture the process of making a dozen loaves at home from scratch. I'm sure it can be done tho by competent kitchen mavens. My gran reportedly made 9 apple pies once for a church bake sale.
    >

    I've done nine loaves at a time. Not lately, though.
    (I do still own a lot of loaf pans/tins.)

  11. #91
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On Sat, 06 Oct 2012 10:19:41 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Kalmia <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I stopped into one in another town, on my never ending search to match some
    >> old glasses. I noticed 4 or 5 clean, almost new bread machines of various
    >> brands, for about 10 bucks each. Trying to forget that I paid 400 for mine
    >> when they first came out, I wondered why they were there. Don't ppl like to
    >> a. save money b. eat healthier, c. have decent bread. Maybe I'm the one
    >> who is weird and eschew Wonder and its ilk. Are ppl lazy or what? At least
    >> when mine dies, I know where to find plenty of cheap replacement choices.
    >>
    >> No glass, by the way.

    >
    >My guess is that someone simply decided that they could, after all, live
    >without having one.
    >
    >My kid's husband had to have one. And after about 2 months regular use,
    >he became bored with it. He isn't really interested in bread, he just
    >wanted to have one because it's cool to have something that does it all
    >for you with minimal investment of personal time.


    That's like having a wife who does it all for him with minimal
    investment of personal time... like what happens when he has sex every
    day... he'll tire of her machine. LOL

  12. #92
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On 06/10/2012 11:47 AM, Kalmia wrote:

    >> There were four boys in the family. I think we went through a lot
    >> more
    >>
    >> bread when it was home made that when it was the commercial stuff,
    >> My
    >>
    >> father, having been raised on a (rabbit) farm was used to home made
    >> or
    >>
    >> bakery bread and hated the commercial stuff. It was a real treat
    >> to
    >>
    >> come home from school to the smell of freshly baked bread and my
    >>
    >> brothers and I often demolished at least one loaf as an after
    >> school
    >>
    >> snack. One of my sisters in law once commented that my brothers and
    >> I
    >>
    >> were the only people she knew who didn't get excited about bakery
    >> bread,
    >>
    >> having been used to home made.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > What kind of oven did she have - how many loaves did she bake at once
    > - must've owned a lot of loaf pans, etc. I can't even begin to
    > picture the process of making a dozen loaves at home from scratch.
    > I'm sure it can be done tho by competent kitchen mavens. My gran
    > reportedly made 9 apple pies once for a church bake sale.
    >




    IIRC it was a Moffat stove. It was just regular household kitchen size.
    It was an interesting appliance, unique at the time and I have never
    seen one since. It has electric motor controlled shelf, Just push a
    button to make it go up or down. One the the stove elements could be
    slid down so that you could insert a pot for deep frying. She never
    trusted that and rarely used it. She had a lot of loaf pans, but they
    were not all the same size. After she died I grabbed a dozen of them for
    making fruit cakes.

  13. #93
    Farm1 Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    "George M. Middius" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Farm1 wrote:
    >
    >> But for those peeps like me, who as a confirmed, died in the wool

    >
    > Why make your burial shroud out of wool? Use polyester or nylon and
    > donate some money to the poor.


    Now George, behave yourself. No self respecting spinner would ever use
    nylon or polyester for anything except knickers.



  14. #94
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On Fri, 5 Oct 2012 11:46:16 +1000, "Farm1" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > I might take you up on that request IF I can figure out how (or to be
    > bothered) to use one of the pic posting sites. Last time I tried that, I
    > spent a whole morning trying it and still couldn't manage to do it.


    There's a bit of a trick at tinypic, meant to flummox the bots and
    make it a bit easier for real humans... especially those of us with
    older eyes.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  15. #95
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On Friday, October 5, 2012 12:14:12 PM UTC-5, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    > Bwrrrryan wrote:
    >
    > >projectile vomit chick wrote:

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> Christonnacracker if yer that into it why can't you figure out how to

    >
    > >> make it yourself? Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

    >
    > >

    >
    > >A yogurt maker beeps at optimum temperature. Easy.

    >
    >
    >
    > Beeps like your gaydar! LOL


    I know how badly you wish that I was gay.

    --Bryan

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