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Thread: Thrift shop observation...

  1. #41
    Mark Storkamp Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    In article <[email protected]>,
    zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Yes people are lazy. But part of it might just be that they don't like
    > a single-task gadget taking up a lot of space.
    >

    I don't remember the brand of my bread machine (Westbend?) but it is a
    combination bread maker / toaster / toaster oven / broiler. They no
    longer make it, and I don't understand why. I use it all the time.

    Sure lot's of breads are available now in the stores, but if you are
    watching your sodium, store bought bread isn't really an option. And
    yes, I'm lazy. But it's not just that. You have to be around for the
    whole process when you make bread by hand. Punching the dough down,
    re-kneading it, forming it. And in the summer I don't like to heat up
    the oven any more than I have to.

  2. #42
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On Wednesday, October 3, 2012 5:05:11 PM UTC-5, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >
    >
    > Bread machines are a dime a dozen in thrift stores. I think it's one of
    >
    > those things that a lot of people think they would like to have, but only a
    >
    > few actually take to it and use it regularly. The typical bread machine eats
    >
    > up counter space while rarely if ever used, until someone finally reclaims
    >
    > its spot and ships it off to Goodwill.


    This got me thinking. I wonder if I could find a yogurt maker there.

    --Bryan

  3. #43
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    Farm1 wrote:

    > Or maybe they are like me and hate bread machines because I've found it's
    > easier to make bread by hand and that way I get a bigger loaf, no failures
    > ever and I don't get a sodding hole in the bottom of the bread.


    I've always assumed the appeal of the bread machine was because you
    can set it to start at 3 a.m. and have super-fresh bread for
    breakfast.



  4. #44
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    news wrote:

    > Breas machines are a pain in the ass to use, and good bakery bread is cheap
    > enough that making it yourself isn't really cost-effective, unless you eat
    > *lots* of bread.


    Where do you live? Around here, good-quality bread costs $5 and up at
    the bakery.



  5. #45
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On Thu, 4 Oct 2012 11:20:54 +1000, "Farm1" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >"Kalmia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]..
    >I stopped into one in another town, on my never ending search to match some
    >old glasses. I noticed 4 or 5 clean, almost new bread machines of various
    >brands, for about 10 bucks each. Trying to forget that I paid 400 for mine
    >when they first came out, I wondered why they were there. Don't ppl like to
    >a. save money b. eat healthier, c. have decent bread.
    >___________________
    >Or maybe they are like me and hate bread machines because I've found it's
    >easier to make bread by hand and that way I get a bigger loaf, no failures
    >ever and I don't get a sodding hole in the bottom of the bread.


    For making one small loaf (~1 1/2 lbs) a bread machine is best... not
    sure what you mean about a "bigger loaf" (bigger than what), and if
    one removes the impeller directly after the last knead there is no
    hole, just a small virginal dimple. I love my bread machine, I've
    been using it at least once a month for over 20 years.

  6. #46
    heyjoe Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On Thu, 04 Oct 2012 09:43:36 -0400, Dave Smith wrote:

    > On 04/10/2012 8:42 AM, heyjoe wrote:
    >> On Wed, 03 Oct 2012 23:11:31 -0400, Dave Smith wrote:
    >>
    >>> We have couple good bakeries in town that make excellent bread.

    >>
    >> Just out of curiousity, how much does a 1 lb loaf of whole wheat bread
    >> cost at your local bakeries?
    >>
    >>

    >
    > I don't weigh them so I can't tell you how much they weigh. At one
    > bakery it is $2.50 for loaf of whole wheat. At my preferred bakery it
    > is $3.50 for multi grain, but the loaves are a lot bigger and a lot
    > heavier.


    Those are good prices! Would've guessed at least $1.50 more than that.
    I would buy from my local bakery at those prices.


    --
    "I jotted down three names: Julia Child, Mr. Wizard and Monty Python"
    A. Brown

  7. #47
    mwall Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    Kalmia carefully entered the following data on 10/03/2012 03:40 PM:
    > I stopped into one in another town, on my never ending search to match some old glasses. I noticed 4 or 5 clean, almost new bread machines of various brands, for about 10 bucks each. Trying to forget that I paid 400 for mine when they first came out, I wondered why they were there. Don't ppl like to a. save money b. eat healthier, c. have decent bread. Maybe I'm the one who is weird and eschew Wonder and its ilk. Are ppl lazy or what? At least when mine dies, I know where to find plenty of cheap replacement choices.
    >
    > No glass, by the way.
    >

    I'd guess some owners got them as gifts.
    They think it's dump and wait for perfect bread. Brand of machine,
    mixes/recipes used, and "sciencey stuff" like temp, amounts, ingredient
    order all matter. Most also believe you MUST BAKE BREAD IN MACHINE/ make
    loaves. ROFL.
    If you insist on baking in the machine, you can remove the paddle before
    the baking cycle begins.

    I would knead the dough in the machine, remove dough and shape into
    loaf, rolls, etc and oven bake.
    Some friends created freeze and bake roll recipes for their families as
    a homemade convenience food.
    Not lazy for those with arthritis who can't knead the dough themselves.

    The biggest reason may be a health issue needing a lifestyle change.

    I saw a comparison done between hand kneading, mixer kneading and ABM
    kneading. Guess which was the smoothest, fastest and best result?
    1. ABM
    2. Mixer, but trailing
    3. Hand

    I think I'll check the thrift stores for a replacement.
    I'm intrigued by a bread kneader machine. hmmm.

  8. #48
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On Thu, 04 Oct 2012 13:00:28 -0400, George M. Middius
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Farm1 wrote:
    >
    > > Or maybe they are like me and hate bread machines because I've found it's
    > > easier to make bread by hand and that way I get a bigger loaf, no failures
    > > ever and I don't get a sodding hole in the bottom of the bread.

    >
    > I've always assumed the appeal of the bread machine was because you
    > can set it to start at 3 a.m. and have super-fresh bread for
    > breakfast.
    >

    My GF had four kids and she liked having fresh, hot bread ready for
    dinner with a minimum of effort.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  9. #49
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...


    On 4-Oct-2012, George M. Middius <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Farm1 wrote:
    >
    > > Or maybe they are like me and hate bread machines because I've found
    > > it's
    > > easier to make bread by hand and that way I get a bigger loaf, no
    > > failures
    > > ever and I don't get a sodding hole in the bottom of the bread.

    >
    > I've always assumed the appeal of the bread machine was because you
    > can set it to start at 3 a.m. and have super-fresh bread for
    > breakfast.


    Only a subset of breads are suitable for delayed start; some breads have
    ingredients that should not be left at room temperature for hours.

    For me, the appeal was infinite variety. Supermarkets have wide, but not
    infinite, selections. Today I might want Sweet Oatmeal bread, next week I
    might want it with inclusions such as toasted millet for a bit of crunch.
    Tomorrow I might have buttermilk bread (one of 9 variations I have recipes
    for) or one of the many rye bread varieties. Sunday, I might have Semolina
    bread, maybe with some sun-drid tomato added, or not. French bread, pita,
    foccacia or Armenian flat-bread; I can do that too - use the dough cycle
    then man-handle the dough into the form I want.

    Sure, I could have done all that by buying a $300-400 Kitchenaid stand
    mixer; but my old Sunbeam MixMaster wasn't up to the job. I could buy an
    expensive Kitchenaid, which I would be unlikely to use for much else, or I
    could buy a much less expensive bread machine to tackle the job I was
    interested in. My Sunbeam eventually died and was replaced by a vintage
    Kitchenaid, bought at an estate sale and seldom used; but, when I make
    bread, I still turn to my trusty old Breadman.

    IMO, if you have a Kitchenaid, use it; if you don't, don't buy one if your
    primary need/desire is to bake a loaf of bread. OTOH, if you need to bake a
    couple of loaves at a time, then Kitchenaid may very well be the right tool
    for the job.

    --

    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  10. #50
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On Thu, 4 Oct 2012 09:49:08 -0700 (PDT), Bryan
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Wednesday, October 3, 2012 5:05:11 PM UTC-5, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > Bread machines are a dime a dozen in thrift stores. I think it's one of
    > >
    > > those things that a lot of people think they would like to have, but only a
    > >
    > > few actually take to it and use it regularly. The typical bread machine eats
    > >
    > > up counter space while rarely if ever used, until someone finally reclaims
    > >
    > > its spot and ships it off to Goodwill.

    >
    > This got me thinking. I wonder if I could find a yogurt maker there.
    >

    If your thrift shops are anything like mine, you'll only find decades
    old electronic items that should have been junked instead of donated.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  11. #51
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    Gee, I have two ( one a giveaway from a pal) and both fit under my counter.There have been times when both were goin' -( making two types of dough. )I bet my first one has been used over a thousand times and never got burnt out. It functions still like it did on its first time at bat ( my nod toCabrera, baseball fans.)

    If a bread flops, it's always due to my careless ingredients measuring, butnever the machine. I have forgotten to put yeast in and dumb moves like that.

  12. #52
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    I was in a Goodwill today - they seemed to have a lot of some kind of instant sangwidge maker - hardly used - prob. Xmas gifts of yore. I noticed a couple of bread machines there too - 7 bucks.

    BTW, lots of old tvs in these places. How DOES one get rid of an old tv? Aren't there companies than mine certain elements from them?

  13. #53
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    Watched? Not mine. It goes "biddle-eee-beep" a few times and the bread isdone, or it'll beep when you want just the dough and IT'S done. OK, so yastart the bread when you know you're going to home for 4 hours, and awake.I guess a lot of ppl are never home for 4 consec. hours. : ))

    I'd hate to know how much money I've saved just making my own pizza dough. Take THAT, Boboli.

  14. #54
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On Thu, 4 Oct 2012 12:44:18 -0700 (PDT), Kalmia
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > BTW, lots of old tvs in these places. How DOES one get rid of an old tv? Aren't there companies than mine certain elements from them?


    We have centers where we can recycle electronics and the City picks
    electronics up at the curb once or twice a year.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  15. #55
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On Wednesday, October 3, 2012 11:11:30 PM UTC-4, Dave Smith wrote:

    >
    > My mother used to make bread by hand at least once a week, more than a
    >
    > dozen loaves at a time.


    Wow - was she feeding an army, selling it, freezing it ahead, or just had a houseful of breadophiles? I bet she was a terrific baker. Takes years to get that good. I admire anyone who can turn out a decent loaf from scratch.

  16. #56
    Krypsis Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On 5/10/2012 5:35 AM, sf wrote:
    > On Thu, 4 Oct 2012 09:49:08 -0700 (PDT), Bryan
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Wednesday, October 3, 2012 5:05:11 PM UTC-5, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Bread machines are a dime a dozen in thrift stores. I think it's one of
    >>>
    >>> those things that a lot of people think they would like to have, but only a
    >>>
    >>> few actually take to it and use it regularly. The typical bread machine eats
    >>>
    >>> up counter space while rarely if ever used, until someone finally reclaims
    >>>
    >>> its spot and ships it off to Goodwill.

    >>
    >> This got me thinking. I wonder if I could find a yogurt maker there.
    >>

    > If your thrift shops are anything like mine, you'll only find decades
    > old electronic items that should have been junked instead of donated.
    >

    I've only seen one bread machine in our local. It was really old and not
    worth buying, even at the very discounted price.

    I do find a lot of music CDs and I tend to buy those. It's amazing what
    gets chucked out! I have found brand new CDs that don't have a scratch
    or smudge on them. Been adding to my music collection over the years at
    a dollar per CD. ;-)



    --

    Krypsis

  17. #57
    Krypsis Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On 4/10/2012 10:25 AM, Nancy Young wrote:
    > On 10/3/2012 9:01 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    >> Kalmia wrote:
    >>>
    >>> I wondered why they were there.

    >>
    >> They were wedding presents. Lots of brides
    >> have no use for any food prep equipment
    >> that isn't a microwave. To them, a bread
    >> machine is about as useful as an electron
    >> microscope.
    >>

    >
    > I guess the same goes for the husbands.
    >
    > nancy


    I resemble that remark!!!!

    --

    Krypsis

  18. #58
    Krypsis Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On 5/10/2012 5:44 AM, Kalmia wrote:
    > I was in a Goodwill today - they seemed to have a lot of some kind of instant sangwidge maker - hardly used - prob. Xmas gifts of yore. I noticed a couple of bread machines there too - 7 bucks.
    >
    > BTW, lots of old tvs in these places. How DOES one get rid of an old tv? Aren't there companies than mine certain elements from them?
    >

    Not much market for old CRT TVs nowadays. Everybody wants flat screens.
    Must admit, I prefer the flat screens myself. We still have a 70 cm
    Loewe CRT TV but its use by date is coming soon. It's analogue and the
    powers that be are switching off analogue transmissions here very soon.
    Only digital in the future so I will need a set top box if I want to
    keep using the Loewe.

    At least they don't render bread machines obsolete en masse like they
    are doing with TVs around here.

    --

    Krypsis

  19. #59
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On Oct 4, 9:49*am, Bryan <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Wednesday, October 3, 2012 5:05:11 PM UTC-5, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >
    > > Bread machines are a dime a dozen in thrift stores. I think it's one of

    >
    > > those things that a lot of people think they would like to have, but only a

    >
    > > few actually take to it and use it regularly. The typical bread machineeats

    >
    > > up counter space while rarely if ever used, until someone finally reclaims

    >
    > > its spot and ships it off to Goodwill.

    >
    > This got me thinking. *I wonder if I could find a yogurt maker there.
    >
    > --Bryan


    You don't need a yogurt maker to make yogurt.

  20. #60
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Thrift shop observation...

    On 10/4/2012 3:44 PM, Kalmia wrote:
    > I was in a Goodwill today - they seemed to have a lot of some kind of instant sangwidge maker - hardly used - prob. Xmas gifts of yore. I noticed a couple of bread machines there too - 7 bucks.
    >
    > BTW, lots of old tvs in these places. How DOES one get rid of an old tv? Aren't there companies than mine certain elements from them?
    >

    Good luck getting rid of a working tv. Maybe if it's practically
    new, some charity will take it. I wound up taking my old tv to
    the recycling center in my town. They sell that stuff to whatever
    company breaks them down for reusable elements.

    nancy

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