Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 28

Thread: Is there a difference?

  1. #1
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Is there a difference?

    Hello All!

    Once in a while I get rather sceptical about recipes that specify
    particular components.

    A recent one has been Kosher salt that my own investigations suggest has
    no *discernible* difference in taste from regular salt. Another one
    surfaced recently with a recipe that specified the pale green cubanelle
    peppers. I also tried it with ordinary green peppers and the only
    difference was that the cubanelles cost three time as much.

    There has also been an argument about pizza dough. The "what the
    hell"/stir it up/ no sugar, method seems to work pretty well and the
    only difference is that the dough could be a liitle less damp and need
    more salt (I've tried it.)
    --


    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations:
    not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  2. #2
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?


    "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:zapSk.788$[email protected]..
    > Hello All!
    >
    > Once in a while I get rather sceptical about recipes that specify
    > particular components.
    >
    > A recent one has been Kosher salt that my own investigations suggest has
    > no *discernible* difference in taste from regular salt. Another one
    > surfaced recently with a recipe that specified the pale green cubanelle
    > peppers. I also tried it with ordinary green peppers and the only
    > difference was that the cubanelles cost three time as much.
    >
    > There has also been an argument about pizza dough. The "what the
    > hell"/stir it up/ no sugar, method seems to work pretty well and the only
    > difference is that the dough could be a liitle less damp and need more
    > salt (I've tried it.)
    > --
    >
    >
    > James Silverton
    > Potomac, Maryland



    NaCl is NaCl and the parts per million will determine the saltiness of any
    recipe. IMHO and only advantage to using a larger grain of salt is the
    larger grains handle and can be spread more evenly.

    Now if you want the dispersion to be more concentrated under particular
    circumstances like the salt grains on a pretzel that's a different story.

    Dimitri


  3. #3
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?

    On Wed, 12 Nov 2008 00:11:11 GMT, "James Silverton"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hello All!
    >
    >Once in a while I get rather sceptical about recipes that specify
    >particular components.
    >

    <snip>
    >
    >There has also been an argument about pizza dough. The "what the
    >hell"/stir it up/ no sugar, method seems to work pretty well and the
    >only difference is that the dough could be a liitle less damp and need
    >more salt (I've tried it.)


    The reason sugar is called for is to feed the yeast when it proofs. A
    little flour in the water works just fine. Those little yeasties just
    like to eat.

    As far as salt goes - I forgot salt when I made pizza last week.
    Everything turned out fine except I thought the crust was a little
    flat tasting. Hubby was the one who asked about salt. It's
    surprising how little is needed to perk up flavor!


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
    interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  4. #4
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?

    Dimitri wrote:
    >
    >
    > NaCl is NaCl and the parts per million will determine the saltiness of
    > any recipe. IMHO and only advantage to using a larger grain of salt is
    > the larger grains handle and can be spread more evenly.
    >


    One of my sisters in law was a health food fanatic. She always used to
    claim that sea salt was better because it was saltier because it came
    from the ocean. The salt we get here comes from salt mines, which were
    deposits from and ocean that was here millions of hears ago.

  5. #5
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?

    On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 19:35:09 -0600, "Gregory Morrow"
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Except for the size of the grain, "salt is salt is salt"...


    Except for those salts that have additives to keep it from clumping.
    Which excludes Kosher salt: it has no additives, and yes, the
    difference can be tasted.

    Christine

  6. #6
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?



    Dave Smith wrote:

    > Dimitri wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > NaCl is NaCl and the parts per million will determine the saltiness of
    > > any recipe. IMHO and only advantage to using a larger grain of salt is
    > > the larger grains handle and can be spread more evenly.
    > >

    >
    > One of my sisters in law was a health food fanatic. She always used to
    > claim that sea salt was better because it was saltier because it came
    > from the ocean. The salt we get here comes from salt mines, which were
    > deposits from and ocean that was here millions of hears ago.



    Except for the size of the grain, "salt is salt is salt"...


    --
    Best
    Greg



  7. #7
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?


    "Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] m...
    >
    >
    > Dave Smith wrote:
    >
    >> Dimitri wrote:
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > NaCl is NaCl and the parts per million will determine the saltiness of
    >> > any recipe. IMHO and only advantage to using a larger grain of salt is
    >> > the larger grains handle and can be spread more evenly.
    >> >

    >>
    >> One of my sisters in law was a health food fanatic. She always used to
    >> claim that sea salt was better because it was saltier because it came
    >> from the ocean. The salt we get here comes from salt mines, which were
    >> deposits from and ocean that was here millions of hears ago.

    >
    >
    > Except for the size of the grain, "salt is salt is salt"...
    >
    >
    > --
    > Best
    > Greg



    Tell your sister to have the PURE SEA SALT analyzed.
    If a whale pissed near the inlet there will be whale piss in her sea salt.

    Salt is SALT

    Dimitri


  8. #8
    Dan Goodman Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?

    Dave Smith wrote:

    > Dimitri wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > NaCl is NaCl and the parts per million will determine the saltiness
    > > of any recipe. IMHO and only advantage to using a larger grain of
    > > salt is the larger grains handle and can be spread more evenly.
    > >

    >
    > One of my sisters in law was a health food fanatic. She always used
    > to claim that sea salt was better because it was saltier because it
    > came from the ocean. The salt we get here comes from salt mines,
    > which were deposits from and ocean that was here millions of hears
    > ago.


    But hers wasn't past its use-by date

    --
    Dan Goodman
    ..sig under reconstruction

  9. #9
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?

    "Christine Dabney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 19:35:09 -0600, "Gregory Morrow"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Except for the size of the grain, "salt is salt is salt"...

    >
    > Except for those salts that have additives to keep it from clumping.
    > Which excludes Kosher salt: it has no additives, and yes, the
    > difference can be tasted.
    >


    What about Iodine?


  10. #10
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?


    "Christine Dabney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > Except for those salts that have additives to keep it from clumping.
    > Which excludes Kosher salt: it has no additives, and yes, the
    > difference can be tasted.
    >
    > Christine


    Read the ingredients on the Morton kosher salt box. Diamond is only salt.



  11. #11
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?

    On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 21:54:55 -0500, "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >Read the ingredients on the Morton kosher salt box. Diamond is only salt.
    >


    Yeah, I know. I have made the mistake of getting the Mortons when I
    couldn't find Diamond.

    When I was in California this spring, I shopped at Smart and Final,
    and got about 4 big boxes of Diamond. It is now the only Kosher salt
    I buy.

    Christine

  12. #12
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?


    "Cheryl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>
    >> Except for those salts that have additives to keep it from clumping.
    >> Which excludes Kosher salt: it has no additives, and yes, the
    >> difference can be tasted.
    >>

    >
    > What about Iodine?


    Table salt usually has iodine added, but kosher salt does not. When iodine
    is added, I can taste a difference on some foods, but not when used in
    strong flavored sauces, such as a well seasoned tomato sauce.



  13. #13
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?


    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>
    >>
    >> Except for the size of the grain, "salt is salt is salt"...
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Best
    >> Greg

    >
    >
    > Tell your sister to have the PURE SEA SALT analyzed.
    > If a whale pissed near the inlet there will be whale piss in her sea salt.
    >
    > Salt is SALT
    >
    > Dimitri


    Pure salt is pure salt. The exception is the salt with additives or other
    minerals (as opposed to pure salt) that add taste to the salt.



  14. #14
    Kenneth Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?

    On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 22:01:44 -0500, "Ed Pawlowski"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Except for the size of the grain, "salt is salt is salt"...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Best
    >>> Greg

    >>
    >>
    >> Tell your sister to have the PURE SEA SALT analyzed.
    >> If a whale pissed near the inlet there will be whale piss in her sea salt.
    >>
    >> Salt is SALT
    >>
    >> Dimitri

    >
    >Pure salt is pure salt. The exception is the salt with additives or other
    >minerals (as opposed to pure salt) that add taste to the salt.
    >

    Howdy,

    As has been mentioned all salt started as sea salt...

    Given the choice, I'll take the mined version, that is, "sea
    salt" without the addition of millennia of pollutants.

    All the best,
    --
    Kenneth

    If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."

  15. #15
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?

    Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    > "Cheryl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> Except for those salts that have additives to keep it from clumping.
    >>> Which excludes Kosher salt: it has no additives, and yes, the
    >>> difference can be tasted.
    >>>

    >> What about Iodine?

    >
    > Table salt usually has iodine added, but kosher salt does not. When iodine
    > is added, I can taste a difference on some foods, but not when used in
    > strong flavored sauces, such as a well seasoned tomato sauce.


    In Canada "table salt" is iodized. When my health food fanatic sister
    in law was on her sea salt kick my niece developed a goiter. She needed
    iodine. That was the reason they started adding iodine to salt in the
    first place.


  16. #16
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?

    Christine Dabney wrote:
    > "Gregory Morrow" wrote:
    > >Except for the size of the grain, "salt is salt

    > is salt"...
    >
    > Except for those salts that have additives to keep it from clumping.
    > Which excludes Kosher salt: it has no additives, and yes, the
    > difference can be tasted.




    Some brands of "kosher salt" (all salt is kosher) do contain anti-
    clumping compounds. The taste difference is attributed to that the
    larger crystals linger longer on the tongue before they dissolve,
    therefore the perceived taste is saltier.

    The difference between table salt and sea salt is that table salt is
    sea salt that has been purified (mined salt is sea salt from long ago
    dried up seas). Sea salt contains whatever minerals/metals/organics
    that were present in the particular body of water from where it was
    taken. No one should use sea salt regularly without consulting their
    phycision, there may be adverse interactions with certain drugs
    (prescription and OTC), and pregnant women would typically be advised
    not to partake at all. Sea salt is actually dirty filthy salt
    (contains raw sewerage. bits of used condoms, heavy metals, etc. -
    truth), why it costs so much more is idiotic... why people buy it is
    even dumber... but then the majority are dumb and prefer to eat ****,
    brined **** though it may be... anyone who prefers sea salt is the
    epitome of a TIADer, who can make good money renting themselves out as
    human bidets, licking out filthy dirty sweaty crotches.


  17. #17
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?

    On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 18:33:24 -0700, Christine Dabney wrote:

    > On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 19:35:09 -0600, "Gregory Morrow"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Except for the size of the grain, "salt is salt is salt"...

    >
    > Except for those salts that have additives to keep it from clumping.
    > Which excludes Kosher salt: it has no additives, and yes, the
    > difference can be tasted.
    >
    > Christine


    my box of morton's kosher salt lists 'yellow prussiate of soda (anticaking
    agent).' it's marked with the 'u' in a circle, so that doesn't
    de-kosherize it.

    i was surprised when i looked yesterday, because like you, i thought it was
    salt only. no iodine, though

    your pal,
    blake

  18. #18
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?

    On Wed, 12 Nov 2008 09:46:46 -0500, Dave Smith wrote:

    > Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >> "Cheryl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>> Except for those salts that have additives to keep it from clumping.
    >>>> Which excludes Kosher salt: it has no additives, and yes, the
    >>>> difference can be tasted.
    >>>>
    >>> What about Iodine?

    >>
    >> Table salt usually has iodine added, but kosher salt does not. When iodine
    >> is added, I can taste a difference on some foods, but not when used in
    >> strong flavored sauces, such as a well seasoned tomato sauce.

    >
    > In Canada "table salt" is iodized. When my health food fanatic sister
    > in law was on her sea salt kick my niece developed a goiter.


    forgive me, but that made me laugh.

    >She needed
    > iodine. That was the reason they started adding iodine to salt in the
    > first place.


    forgive me, but that made me laugh.

    yes, goiter was endemic in some areas of the u.s. before iodine was added:

    There are numerous reports in the literature that demonstrate effectiveness
    of iodized salt in controlling endemic goiter. Iodization of salt is known
    to be a safe, efficient, and preferred prophylactic method for endemic
    goiter in the U.S. (Ref. 1). In the early 1900's, goiter was prevalent in
    those states bordering the Great Lakes and in the northwestern region of
    the United States. Voluntary fortification of salt with iodine was
    introduced in 1924 and resulted in a virtual elimination of endemic goiter
    in the U.S. Some notable examples are as follows:

    <http://www.saltinstitute.org/idd.html>

    your pal,
    blake


  19. #19
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?

    blake murphy wrote:
    >
    >>> Table salt usually has iodine added, but kosher salt does not. When iodine
    >>> is added, I can taste a difference on some foods, but not when used in
    >>> strong flavored sauces, such as a well seasoned tomato sauce.

    >> In Canada "table salt" is iodized. When my health food fanatic sister
    >> in law was on her sea salt kick my niece developed a goiter.

    >
    > forgive me, but that made me laugh.
    >
    >> She needed
    >> iodine. That was the reason they started adding iodine to salt in the
    >> first place.

    >
    > forgive me, but that made me laugh.


    I have to admit that it allowed me a bit of a chuckle at her self
    righteous and fanatical attitude about her health foods. Here she was
    thinking that her so-called health foods were so much healthier for her
    and her family and her daughter ends up with a health problem that had
    been remedied decades earlier by adding a little iodine to table salt,
    just enough to provide a supplement of a basic mineral requirement. Add
    that to her much expressed opinion that sea salt is saltier than mined
    salt, apparently unaware that mined salt comes from dried up ocean
    beds,which I guess she assumed was a different NaCL that the stuff in
    the oceans these days.


  20. #20
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Is there a difference?

    blake wrote on Wed, 12 Nov 2008 15:32:03 GMT:

    >> Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >>> "Cheryl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>>> Except for those salts that have additives to keep it from
    >>>>> clumping. Which excludes Kosher salt: it has no additives,
    >>>>> and yes, the difference can be tasted.
    >>>>>
    >>>> What about Iodine?
    >>>
    >>> Table salt usually has iodine added, but kosher salt does
    >>> not. When iodine is added, I can taste a difference on some
    >>> foods, but not when used in strong flavored sauces, such as
    >>> a well seasoned tomato sauce.

    >>
    >> In Canada "table salt" is iodized. When my health food
    >> fanatic sister in law was on her sea salt kick my niece
    >> developed a goiter.


    > forgive me, but that made me laugh.


    >> She needed
    >> iodine. That was the reason they started adding iodine to
    >> salt in the first place.


    > forgive me, but that made me laugh.


    > yes, goiter was endemic in some areas of the u.s. before
    > iodine was added:


    > There are numerous reports in the literature that demonstrate
    > effectiveness of iodized salt in controlling endemic goiter.
    > Iodization of salt is known to be a safe, efficient, and
    > preferred prophylactic method for endemic goiter in the U.S.
    > (Ref. 1). In the early 1900's, goiter was prevalent in those
    > states bordering the Great Lakes and in the northwestern
    > region of the United States. Voluntary fortification of salt
    > with iodine was introduced in 1924 and resulted in a virtual
    > elimination of endemic goiter in the U.S. Some notable
    > examples are as follows:


    > <http://www.saltinstitute.org/idd.html>


    Yes, of course you are right Blake. Goiter used to be common in many
    parts of the world, like Switzerland, before the introduction of iodized
    salt. Another useful reference is
    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/goiter/DS00217. Surely, this one can
    hardly be called biased as some of the anti-iodide people maintain. Tho'
    I can smell iodine in iodized salt, especially if it has been around for
    a while, I can't detect it in dishes made with iodized salt.


    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32