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Thread: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer

  1. #1
    Somebody Guest

    Default tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer

    Why is tea good cold or hot, but beer is only good when cold?



  2. #2
    Chemo Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer

    On Oct 9, 4:23*pm, "Somebody" <e...@mail.au> wrote:
    > Why is tea good cold or hot, but beer is only good when cold?


    What, you never drank Guinness warm? Oh that's right...you drink Pabst.

  3. #3
    Somebody Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer

    "Chemo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..

    What, you never drank Guinness warm? Oh that's right...you drink Pabst.

    ---

    Please, f**k that ****... Heine or Becks. I got standards!



  4. #4
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer

    On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 19:30:49 -0400, "Somebody" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Chemo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]..
    >
    >What, you never drank Guinness warm? Oh that's right...you drink Pabst.
    >
    >---
    >
    >Please, f**k that ****... Heine or Becks. I got standards!
    >


    The better the beer, the better it is warm.

    John Kuthe...

  5. #5
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer

    On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 16:25:31 -0700 (PDT), Chemo <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Oct 9, 4:23*pm, "Somebody" <e...@mail.au> wrote:
    >> Why is tea good cold or hot, but beer is only good when cold?

    >
    >What, you never drank Guinness warm? Oh that's right...you drink Pabst.



    Given a choice between the two, Pabst would win. IMO, Guinness is the
    worst beer I ever tasted. Tried it twice but could not finish it. The
    popularity of it puzzles me.

  6. #6
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer


    "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 16:25:31 -0700 (PDT), Chemo <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Oct 9, 4:23 pm, "Somebody" <e...@mail.au> wrote:
    >>> Why is tea good cold or hot, but beer is only good when cold?

    >>
    >>What, you never drank Guinness warm? Oh that's right...you drink Pabst.

    >
    >
    > Given a choice between the two, Pabst would win. IMO, Guinness is the
    > worst beer I ever tasted. Tried it twice but could not finish it. The
    > popularity of it puzzles me.


    It's ale, not beer for one. It is a stout ale which is extremely malty,
    heavily roastyed chocolate malt to be exact, and in the case of Guinness
    includes a bit of spoiled ale. It's not bad at all, it is actually an
    outstanding example of a stout ale. You just do not like it.

    Paul



  7. #7
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer


    "John Kuthe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 19:30:49 -0400, "Somebody" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>"Chemo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected]..
    >>
    >>What, you never drank Guinness warm? Oh that's right...you drink Pabst.
    >>
    >>---
    >>
    >>Please, f**k that ****... Heine or Becks. I got standards!
    >>

    >
    > The better the beer, the better it is warm.


    Errr - no. Beers taste best at the ideal fermentation temperature for the
    yeasts which were used. This brings out the delicate esthers which
    contribute so much to the flavor profile. Lagers and pilseners ferment cold
    while ales ferment warm. That is why ales taste best warm. By warm we are
    talking 66-68F as opposed to lagers which are best around 34-36F.

    Paul



  8. #8
    Christopher Helms Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer

    On Oct 9, 9:43*pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    > "John Kuthe" <JohnKu...@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    > > On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 19:30:49 -0400, "Somebody" <e...@mail.au> wrote:

    >
    > >>"Chemo" <bhansen1...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > >>news:[email protected]...

    >
    > >>What, you never drank Guinness warm? Oh that's right...you drink Pabst.

    >
    > >>---

    >
    > >>Please, f**k that ****... *Heine or Becks. *I got standards!

    >
    > > The better the beer, the better it is warm.

    >
    > Errr - no. *Beers taste best at the ideal fermentation temperature for the
    > yeasts which were used. *This brings out the delicate esthers which
    > contribute so much to the flavor profile. *Lagers and pilseners fermentcold
    > while ales ferment warm. *That is why ales taste best warm. *By warm we are
    > talking 66-68F as opposed to lagers which are best around 34-36F.
    >
    > Paul



    IMHO, Homebrewed ale tastes best with just a bit of a chill on it,
    even though it ferments around 70 degrees. Of course homebrew is not
    pasteurized so there may be some different things going on there, as
    opposed to the sterile, packaged stuff.

  9. #9
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer


    "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 16:25:31 -0700 (PDT), Chemo <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Oct 9, 4:23 pm, "Somebody" <e...@mail.au> wrote:
    >>> Why is tea good cold or hot, but beer is only good when cold?

    >>
    >>What, you never drank Guinness warm? Oh that's right...you drink Pabst.

    >
    >
    > Given a choice between the two, Pabst would win. IMO, Guinness is the
    > worst beer I ever tasted. Tried it twice but could not finish it. The
    > popularity of it puzzles me.


    There's Guinness and there's Guinness and there's Guinness.
    If you have had it in any way other than from the Irish keg on tap,
    in a place with high turnover, forget it. If you have had any of the
    bottled abortions under a Guinness label, forget it. The true
    Guinness is soft, very smooth, rich almost beyond compare,
    no rough edges at all, just lovely mother's milk. Go on a quest,
    seek it out. Whatever you have had is bad and wrong.

    pavane



  10. #10
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer


    "Christopher Helms" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    On Oct 9, 9:43 pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    > "John Kuthe" <JohnKu...@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    > > On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 19:30:49 -0400, "Somebody" <e...@mail.au> wrote:

    >
    > >>"Chemo" <bhansen1...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > >>news:[email protected]..

    >
    > >>What, you never drank Guinness warm? Oh that's right...you drink Pabst.

    >
    > >>---

    >
    > >>Please, f**k that ****... Heine or Becks. I got standards!

    >
    > > The better the beer, the better it is warm.

    >
    > Errr - no. Beers taste best at the ideal fermentation temperature for the
    > yeasts which were used. This brings out the delicate esthers which
    > contribute so much to the flavor profile. Lagers and pilseners ferment
    > cold
    > while ales ferment warm. That is why ales taste best warm. By warm we are
    > talking 66-68F as opposed to lagers which are best around 34-36F.
    >
    > Paul



    IMHO, Homebrewed ale tastes best with just a bit of a chill on it,
    even though it ferments around 70 degrees. Of course homebrew is not
    pasteurized so there may be some different things going on there, as
    opposed to the sterile, packaged stuff.


    Beer and ale, even the commercial stuff. is not pasteurized as the pathogens
    that would be killed by pasteurization - ie salmonella, listeria, e. coli,
    cannot live in beer due the alcohol content and extreme acidity. Not only
    that but beer is boiled for a long time after the wort stage. It is quite
    thoroughly sanitized prior to fermentation.

    Nothing that can harm a human can live in beer.

    Paul



  11. #11
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer


    "pavane" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:HI5ds.573994$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 16:25:31 -0700 (PDT), Chemo <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Oct 9, 4:23 pm, "Somebody" <e...@mail.au> wrote:
    >>>> Why is tea good cold or hot, but beer is only good when cold?
    >>>
    >>>What, you never drank Guinness warm? Oh that's right...you drink Pabst.

    >>
    >>
    >> Given a choice between the two, Pabst would win. IMO, Guinness is the
    >> worst beer I ever tasted. Tried it twice but could not finish it. The
    >> popularity of it puzzles me.

    >
    > There's Guinness and there's Guinness and there's Guinness.
    > If you have had it in any way other than from the Irish keg on tap,
    > in a place with high turnover, forget it. If you have had any of the
    > bottled abortions under a Guinness label, forget it. The true
    > Guinness is soft, very smooth, rich almost beyond compare,
    > no rough edges at all, just lovely mother's milk. Go on a quest,
    > seek it out. Whatever you have had is bad and wrong.
    >
    > pavane



    The best thing Guinness did was to developed the nitrogen charge which kicks
    in when the can is opened. The can is lined with plastic so you don't get
    the can taste. It's pretty darn good.

    Paul



  12. #12
    Christopher Helms Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer

    On Oct 9, 10:37*pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    > "Christopher Helms" <chrishel...@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    > On Oct 9, 9:43 pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > "John Kuthe" <JohnKu...@gmail.com> wrote in message

    >
    > >news:[email protected]. .

    >
    > > > On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 19:30:49 -0400, "Somebody" <e...@mail.au> wrote:

    >
    > > >>"Chemo" <bhansen1...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > > >>news:[email protected]...

    >
    > > >>What, you never drank Guinness warm? Oh that's right...you drink Pabst.

    >
    > > >>---

    >
    > > >>Please, f**k that ****... Heine or Becks. I got standards!

    >
    > > > The better the beer, the better it is warm.

    >
    > > Errr - no. Beers taste best at the ideal fermentation temperature for the
    > > yeasts which were used. This brings out the delicate esthers which
    > > contribute so much to the flavor profile. Lagers and pilseners ferment
    > > cold
    > > while ales ferment warm. That is why ales taste best warm. By warm we are
    > > talking 66-68F as opposed to lagers which are best around 34-36F.

    >
    > > Paul

    >
    > IMHO, Homebrewed ale tastes best with just a bit of a chill on it,
    > even though it ferments around 70 degrees. Of course homebrew is not
    > pasteurized so there may be some different things going on there, as
    > opposed to the sterile, packaged stuff.
    >
    > Beer and ale, even the commercial stuff. is not pasteurized as the pathogens
    > that would be killed by pasteurization - ie salmonella, listeria, e. coli,
    > cannot live in beer due the alcohol content and extreme acidity. *Not only
    > that but beer is boiled for a long time after the wort stage. *It is quite
    > thoroughly sanitized prior to fermentation.
    >
    > Nothing that can harm a human can live in beer.
    >
    > Paul



    They don't do it to kill pathogens. Its to extend shelf life. The
    yeast is very much alive and would alter the stuff in the bottle or
    can over the months and months that commercial brews can sit around
    between the brewery and pizza night or Sports Center or whatever. I
    believe Miller Genuine Draft is cold filtered in some way to remove
    the yeast, as opposed to heating the product to kill it. They also use
    chemicals for head retention and clarity, because beer doesn't like to
    be heated.

  13. #13
    Helpful person Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer

    On Oct 9, 8:12*pm, "pavane" <pav...@leisure.org> wrote:
    >
    > There's Guinness and there's Guinness and there's Guinness.
    > If you have had it in any way other than from the Irish keg on tap,
    > in a *place with high turnover, forget it. If you have had any of the
    > bottled abortions under a Guinness label, forget it. The true
    > Guinness is soft, very smooth, rich almost beyond compare,
    > no rough edges at all, just lovely mother's milk. Go on a quest,
    > seek it out. Whatever you have had is bad and wrong.
    >
    > pavane


    Thank heavens there's one person who knows what Guinness should be.
    When living in Great Britain in the 1970s I was a fanatic beer
    drinker, sometimes traveling 50 miles to try a new real ale. There
    was a lot spoken (with good reason) regarding the need for beer to
    ferment in the pub and be pumped by lift pumps, not carbon dioxide.
    Some of those beers are amazing.

    That said, I don't care how Guinness is made, stored or pumped. It is
    possibly the best beer in the world. It's the only beer whose quality
    is obvious before drinking it. A perfect Guinness (draft of course)
    has a tight head with tiny bubbles with no visible structure and
    served at cellar temperature.

    It's almost impossible to get a good Guinness in the US, it's
    invariably served too cold. It can be found in Great Britain. I'm
    told (as I've never been there) that what is served in Great Britain
    is a poor shadow of what's available in Ireland.

    http://www.richardfisher.com

  14. #14
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer


    "Christopher Helms" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Oct 9, 10:37 pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    > "Christopher Helms" <chrishel...@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    > On Oct 9, 9:43 pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > "John Kuthe" <JohnKu...@gmail.com> wrote in message

    >
    > >news:[email protected]. .

    >
    > > > On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 19:30:49 -0400, "Somebody" <e...@mail.au> wrote:

    >
    > > >>"Chemo" <bhansen1...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > > >>news:[email protected]..

    >
    > > >>What, you never drank Guinness warm? Oh that's right...you drink
    > > >>Pabst.

    >
    > > >>---

    >
    > > >>Please, f**k that ****... Heine or Becks. I got standards!

    >
    > > > The better the beer, the better it is warm.

    >
    > > Errr - no. Beers taste best at the ideal fermentation temperature for
    > > the
    > > yeasts which were used. This brings out the delicate esthers which
    > > contribute so much to the flavor profile. Lagers and pilseners ferment
    > > cold
    > > while ales ferment warm. That is why ales taste best warm. By warm we
    > > are
    > > talking 66-68F as opposed to lagers which are best around 34-36F.

    >
    > > Paul

    >
    > IMHO, Homebrewed ale tastes best with just a bit of a chill on it,
    > even though it ferments around 70 degrees. Of course homebrew is not
    > pasteurized so there may be some different things going on there, as
    > opposed to the sterile, packaged stuff.
    >
    > Beer and ale, even the commercial stuff. is not pasteurized as the
    > pathogens
    > that would be killed by pasteurization - ie salmonella, listeria, e. coli,
    > cannot live in beer due the alcohol content and extreme acidity. Not only
    > that but beer is boiled for a long time after the wort stage. It is quite
    > thoroughly sanitized prior to fermentation.
    >
    > Nothing that can harm a human can live in beer.
    >
    > Paul



    They don't do it to kill pathogens. Its to extend shelf life. The
    yeast is very much alive and would alter the stuff in the bottle or
    can over the months and months that commercial brews can sit around
    between the brewery and pizza night or Sports Center or whatever. I
    believe Miller Genuine Draft is cold filtered in some way to remove
    the yeast, as opposed to heating the product to kill it. They also use
    chemicals for head retention and clarity, because beer doesn't like to
    be heated.

    ---------------

    Yeast is not harmful in any way shape or form - in beer that is. Yes,
    natural beer is full of yeast. In fact some brewers will collect the yeast
    in the bottles and revive them for another batch. It is harmless and there
    is no danger whatsoever.

    Paul



  15. #15
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer


    "Helpful person" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Oct 9, 8:12 pm, "pavane" <pav...@leisure.org> wrote:
    >
    > There's Guinness and there's Guinness and there's Guinness.
    > If you have had it in any way other than from the Irish keg on tap,
    > in a place with high turnover, forget it. If you have had any of the
    > bottled abortions under a Guinness label, forget it. The true
    > Guinness is soft, very smooth, rich almost beyond compare,
    > no rough edges at all, just lovely mother's milk. Go on a quest,
    > seek it out. Whatever you have had is bad and wrong.
    >
    > pavane


    Thank heavens there's one person who knows what Guinness should be.
    When living in Great Britain in the 1970s I was a fanatic beer
    drinker, sometimes traveling 50 miles to try a new real ale. There
    was a lot spoken (with good reason) regarding the need for beer to
    ferment in the pub and be pumped by lift pumps, not carbon dioxide.
    Some of those beers are amazing.

    That said, I don't care how Guinness is made, stored or pumped. It is
    possibly the best beer in the world. It's the only beer whose quality
    is obvious before drinking it. A perfect Guinness (draft of course)
    has a tight head with tiny bubbles with no visible structure and
    served at cellar temperature.

    It's almost impossible to get a good Guinness in the US, it's
    invariably served too cold. It can be found in Great Britain. I'm
    told (as I've never been there) that what is served in Great Britain
    is a poor shadow of what's available in Ireland.

    http://www.richardfisher.com


    It is amazing ale to be sure. Makes a darn good pot roast too. Five
    hundred years and counting - something has to be right.

    Paul



  16. #16
    Somebody Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer

    "pavane" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:HI5ds.573994$[email protected]..
    >
    > There's Guinness and there's Guinness and there's Guinness.
    > If you have had it in any way other than from the Irish keg on tap,
    > in a place with high turnover, forget it. If you have had any of the
    > bottled abortions under a Guinness label, forget it. The true
    > Guinness is soft, very smooth, rich almost beyond compare,
    > no rough edges at all, just lovely mother's milk. Go on a quest,
    > seek it out. Whatever you have had is bad and wrong.
    >
    > pavane


    Roommates had a party once and leftover beer from a tapped keg. After the
    second day unrefrigerated... got so sick. I didn't think beer went bad.
    Does tea?




  17. #17
    Somebody Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer

    "Helpful person" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    Thank heavens there's one person who knows what Guinness should be.
    When living in Great Britain in the 1970s I was a fanatic beer
    drinker, sometimes traveling 50 miles to try a new real ale. There
    was a lot spoken (with good reason) regarding the need for beer to
    ferment in the pub and be pumped by lift pumps, not carbon dioxide.
    Some of those beers are amazing.

    ---

    I'm trying to find Henry Weinhard's pale blue ale... Had it out West. But
    I don't think I can drive 4 hours to St Louis.



  18. #18
    Somebody Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- beer gone bad

    "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:k52qik$9r7$[email protected]..

    > Beer and ale, even the commercial stuff. is not pasteurized as the
    > pathogens that would be killed by pasteurization - ie salmonella,
    > listeria, e. coli, cannot live in beer due the alcohol content and extreme
    > acidity. Not only that but beer is boiled for a long time after the wort
    > stage. It is quite thoroughly sanitized prior to fermentation.
    >
    > Nothing that can harm a human can live in beer.
    >
    > Paul


    now I am confused... Why did the keg my roommates had make us all sick?
    (Guess it was not the beer but some other contamination? It was out in the
    sun in Denver, mid 80s... But like you say, alcohol is supposed to be
    inhospitable to little beasties-- even the ones that created it.)




  19. #19
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer

    On 10/9/2012 10:15 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    > On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 16:25:31 -0700 (PDT), Chemo <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> On Oct 9, 4:23 pm, "Somebody" <e...@mail.au> wrote:
    >>> Why is tea good cold or hot, but beer is only good when cold?

    >>
    >> What, you never drank Guinness warm? Oh that's right...you drink Pabst.

    >
    >
    > Given a choice between the two, Pabst would win. IMO, Guinness is the
    > worst beer I ever tasted. Tried it twice but could not finish it. The
    > popularity of it puzzles me.
    >

    To me, there are many types of beer, of which Stout is one. I don't like
    beer of any sort served warm. It doesn't have to be near freezing, which
    is the correct temperature for Pabst, Budweiser and the like. I like
    Guinness Export Special at refrigerator temperature but I'm not fond of
    draft Guinness even as served in Ireland; cool but not really cold.

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.

  20. #20
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: tech support question, regarding-- tea, beer

    On Oct 9, 9:43*pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    > "John Kuthe" <JohnKu...@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    > > On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 19:30:49 -0400, "Somebody" <e...@mail.au> wrote:

    >
    > >>"Chemo" <bhansen1...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > >>news:[email protected]...

    >
    > >>What, you never drank Guinness warm? Oh that's right...you drink Pabst.

    >
    > >>---

    >
    > >>Please, f**k that ****... *Heine or Becks. *I got standards!

    >
    > > The better the beer, the better it is warm.

    >
    > Errr - no. *Beers taste best at the ideal fermentation temperature for the
    > yeasts which were used. *This brings out the delicate esthers which
    > contribute so much to the flavor profile. *Lagers and pilseners fermentcold
    > while ales ferment warm. *That is why ales taste best warm. *By warm we are
    > talking 66-68F as opposed to lagers which are best around 34-36F.


    Bull****. You can have your warm ale. Here, the cans of canoe beer
    are kept at 32-33F (the basement fridge or ice chest), and the pale
    ale and good tasting lagers (Negra Modelo) at about 35-36F (the
    kitchen fridge). I can enjoy Wild Cherry Diet Pepsi at room
    temperature too, but I'd rather have it cold. Same with beer, even
    good tasting beer.

    I'm envisioning a table of bearded men, all wearing tweed jackets with
    elbow patches, feeling all smug that they are drinking 67 degree beer.
    >
    > Paul


    --Bryan

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