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Thread: Teas and silver services

  1. #1
    Felice Guest

    Default Teas and silver services

    Does anyone still maintain a silver tea service? My parents gave me mine for
    a (50's) wedding gift and I spent years polishing it before I found out that
    if I loaned it out for PTA teas the Class Mothers would do the job for me.

    A few years ago, with no more PTA teas in my life, I palmed it off on the
    Senior Daughter. She has Tom Sawyered her daughter into keeping it shiny.

    Felice





  2. #2
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services



    Felice wrote:
    >
    > Does anyone still maintain a silver tea service? My parents gave me mine for
    > a (50's) wedding gift and I spent years polishing it before I found out that
    > if I loaned it out for PTA teas the Class Mothers would do the job for me.
    >
    > A few years ago, with no more PTA teas in my life, I palmed it off on the
    > Senior Daughter. She has Tom Sawyered her daughter into keeping it shiny.
    >
    > Felice


    No, sadly. We have a silver sugar/creamer/tray thing though, with the
    obligate sugar tongs The tea/coffee pots in our family have always
    been ceramic. Also have one stainless steel teapot which doesn't drip
    one bit while pouring.

  3. #3
    maxine Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services

    On May 27, 2:50*pm, "Felice" <fri...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > Does anyone still maintain a silver tea service? My parents gave me mine for
    > a (50's) wedding gift and I spent years polishing it before I found out that
    > if I loaned it out for PTA teas the Class Mothers would do the job for me..
    >
    > A few years ago, with no more PTA teas in my life, I palmed it off on the
    > Senior Daughter. She has Tom Sawyered her daughter into keeping it shiny.
    >
    > Felice


    My mother kept hers in a glass-front case, and placed pennies
    discretely on the shelf around it. It stayed shiny and untarnished.,

    maxine in ri

  4. #4
    Joseph Littleshoes Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services



    Arri London wrote:
    >
    > Felice wrote:
    >
    >>Does anyone still maintain a silver tea service? My parents gave me mine for
    >>a (50's) wedding gift and I spent years polishing it before I found out that
    >>if I loaned it out for PTA teas the Class Mothers would do the job for me.
    >>
    >>A few years ago, with no more PTA teas in my life, I palmed it off on the
    >>Senior Daughter. She has Tom Sawyered her daughter into keeping it shiny.
    >>
    >>Felice

    >
    >
    > No, sadly. We have a silver sugar/creamer/tray thing though, with the
    > obligate sugar tongs The tea/coffee pots in our family have always
    > been ceramic. Also have one stainless steel teapot which doesn't drip
    > one bit while pouring.


    Fortunately, gold plate don't tarnish

    Of course the best way to keep silver from tarnishing is to use it.

    Just FYI for even more information than what i quote below .....

    http://www.silversmithing.com/care.htm

    "Sterling, like a fine automobile, must be handled with tender loving
    care. You certainly wouldn't drive your Rolls Royce through a car wash,
    would you?

    Silver Storage & Display

    Your primary consideration should be to keep silver objects clean and
    free of dust and surface grime. In addition, the following guidelines
    will help to preserve your silver’s finish while it is on display or in
    storage.

    To minimize the formation of tarnish inside display cases, use 3M
    Anti-Tarnish Strips (see section on 3M ANTI-TARNISH STRIPS) to absorb
    tarnish-producing gases, and silica gel (see section on SILICA GEL) to
    keep relative humidity low. Certain paints, oils, and fabrics within the
    case can accelerate the formation of tarnish. Therefore, if the case or
    cabinet is made of wood, the interior surface should be sealed,
    preferably with lacquer or polyurethane. If latex paint is used, allow
    it to dry for at least four months.

    If a silver piece to be stored is already tarnished, even if it is
    heavily blackened, it need not be polished before storing: doing so will
    only reveal fresh sterling or fine silver electroplate to be exposed to
    the elements. Before storing, wrap each piece in non-buffered tissue
    paper (acid-free and of archival quality) or soft anti-tarnish tissue,
    place it in a polyethylene bag such as a Ziploc, toss in a 3M
    Anti–Tarnish Strip, and seal the bag. This will provide some protection
    against changes in relative humidity and create a barrier against
    tarnish-producing gases.

    Another option is to wrap the object in a sulfur-absorbing cloth such as
    Pacific Silvercloth before putting it in the polyethylene bag. This type
    of fabric is impregnated with microscopic particles of silver that
    attract sulfur, thereby preventing much of it from being absorbed by the
    piece being stored. Pacific Silvercloth flannel flatware rolls will
    protect each piece individually. (Sulfur-absorbing cloths must be
    replaced from time to time as they eventually become saturated.) You can
    further protect silver pieces against tarnish by placing small
    containers of silica gel (to absorb moisture) and activated charcoal (to
    absorb pollutants) in the storage bag.

    Some storage materials should be avoided. Wrapping in newspaper or
    binding in rubber bands can cause deep discoloration that may have to be
    professionally polished. Plastic wrap contains tarnish-producing
    materials and can also adhere to the silver over time, requiring
    solvents to remove. Finally, non-archival cardboard boxes contain acids
    that aggressively tarnish silver.

    Lacquering or waxing silver retards tarnish formation, but is generally
    not recommended because of the difficulty in obtaining an even coating.
    If the coating is uneven, when the object re-tarnishes, it looks worse
    than if no coating had been applied at all. However, in an open display
    where surface protection of the object is necessary, a skillful
    application of micro-crystalline wax such as Renaissance is recommended.

    3M Anti-Tarnish Strips

    3M Anti-Tarnish Strips can be used to absorb tarnish-producing gases.
    The strips are made from a 45-lb. paper containing activated charcoal.
    They guard against corrosion, tarnish, and discoloration by absorbing
    airborne pollutants. These strips can also be used to protect objects
    containing copper, brass, solder, gold, and tin. Unlike similar
    products, 3M strips absorb on both sides.

    A 2"x7" strip will protect an area up to 422 cubic inches, the
    approximate size of a flatware chest. Protection time depends on the
    nature and permeability of the storage container and on the pollution
    level of the surrounding atmosphere. The following guidelines apply to
    an average atmosphere: loosely sealed container (e.g., cardboard box,
    china cabinet, or flatware chest): 6 months; moderately sealed container
    (e.g., lightweight polyethylene bag): 12 months; and tightly sealed
    container (e.g., low-permeability polyethylene bag): up to 24 months.
    The strips should be replaced in a timely fashion because once they are
    fully saturated with pollutants, the strips will become inactive.

    Silica Gel

    Since World War II, silica gel has been the drying agent of choice by
    government and industry. It is safe to use with even the most sensitive
    materials, including food and medicine—it’s what is contained in those
    tiny packets enclosed in pill bottles and shoe boxes to prevent
    moisture. It prevents tarnish- and corrosion-causing condensation within
    enclosed areas, such as flatware drawers and china cabinets. Such areas
    should be made as vapor-proof as possible.

    Despite its name, silica gel is not a gel, but is in the form of
    chemically inert man-made granules containing thousands of tiny crevices
    that “drink up” excess humidity from the air by surface adsorption. A
    good choice of product is a canister containing silica gel that turns
    from blue to pink when saturated with moisture. Reactivate the gel by
    drying the canister in a conventional oven. The reactivation process can
    be repeated indefinitely for a lifetime of protection. (Read directions
    thoroughly; silica gel dust should not be inhaled.)

    • • •

    Credits

    A large part of the information in the sections on Chemical Dips,
    Electrochemical (Galvanic) Reduction, and Silver Display & Storage was
    obtained from articles supplied by the Canadian Conservation Institute,
    Department of Canadian Heritage, 1030 Innes Rd., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    K1A OM5, 613/998-3721; Fax: 613/998-4721. Jeffrey Herman supplied
    additional information on these topics."
    --
    JL


  5. #5
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services

    "Felice" <[email protected]>
    news:gvk7s9$iu5$[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking

    > Does anyone still maintain a silver tea service? My parents gave me
    > mine for a (50's) wedding gift and I spent years polishing it before I
    > found out that if I loaned it out for PTA teas the Class Mothers would
    > do the job for me.
    >
    > A few years ago, with no more PTA teas in my life, I palmed it off on
    > the Senior Daughter. She has Tom Sawyered her daughter into keeping it
    > shiny.


    We have one. It's huge. We've also got a ton of silver trays, serving
    pieces etc. We never use it. It's all wrapped in some special plastic
    stuff to help keep it all from tarnishing. All of it was inherited from
    one side of the family or other. Don't use it or want it, but can't seem
    to part with it either. Maybe the niece will make use of it some day.

    Michael

    --
    ďAlways tell the truth - it's the easiest thing to rememberĒ
    ~ American Playwright David Mamet

    You can find me at: - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  6. #6
    bob Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services

    On Wed, 27 May 2009 14:50:51 -0400, "Felice" <[email protected]>
    shouted from the highest rooftop:

    >Does anyone still maintain a silver tea service? My parents gave me mine for
    >a (50's) wedding gift and I spent years polishing it before I found out that
    >if I loaned it out for PTA teas the Class Mothers would do the job for me.
    >
    >A few years ago, with no more PTA teas in my life, I palmed it off on the
    >Senior Daughter. She has Tom Sawyered her daughter into keeping it shiny.


    We had my wife's Georgian sterling silver tea service (plus trays that
    weighed a tonne) for years. But, like you, she got tired of keeping it
    polished and asked the kids if they wanted it. Nope ... they said,
    "sell it and spend the money on a holiday." So that's what we did.
    Sent it and other unwanted sterling bits and pieces to auction where
    they made more than enough to send us on our way.

    What we've used since are a variety of ceramic tea pots we've bought
    over the years - a couple of them made by friends. No polishing
    involved.

    Ironically, my wife inherited a whole load of sterling - including
    another tea service and a dozen or so huge racing cups - when her aunt
    died. Except for a couple of small items that she's kept for
    sentimental reasons (and a small, efficient sterling silver pepper
    grinder I pleaded for) the whole lot went to auction in the UK after
    we returned to NZ. But her aunt never had to polish any of it.


    --

    una cerveza mas por favor ...

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~
    Wax-up and drop-in of Surfing's Golden Years: <http://www.surfwriter.net>
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~

  7. #7
    bob Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services

    On Wed, 27 May 2009 19:44:28 -0700, Joseph Littleshoes
    <[email protected]> shouted from the highest rooftop:

    >
    >
    >Arri London wrote:
    >>
    >> Felice wrote:
    >>
    >>>Does anyone still maintain a silver tea service? My parents gave me mine for
    >>>a (50's) wedding gift and I spent years polishing it before I found out that
    >>>if I loaned it out for PTA teas the Class Mothers would do the job for me.
    >>>
    >>>A few years ago, with no more PTA teas in my life, I palmed it off on the
    >>>Senior Daughter. She has Tom Sawyered her daughter into keeping it shiny.
    >>>
    >>>Felice

    >>
    >>
    >> No, sadly. We have a silver sugar/creamer/tray thing though, with the
    >> obligate sugar tongs The tea/coffee pots in our family have always
    >> been ceramic. Also have one stainless steel teapot which doesn't drip
    >> one bit while pouring.

    >
    >Fortunately, gold plate don't tarnish
    >
    >Of course the best way to keep silver from tarnishing is to use it.


    Not if you live next to the Pacific Ocean. The only thing that does
    work is storing each piece in a zip-lock bag after polishing them.
    Otherwise, silver tarnishes regardless of how often you use it - even
    forks and spoons.

    BTW - we only use our dishwasher for two things. After dinner parties
    and removing tarnish from silverware before dinner parties. Washing
    silverware by hand just doesn't do the trick.


    --

    una cerveza mas por favor ...

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~
    Wax-up and drop-in of Surfing's Golden Years: <http://www.surfwriter.net>
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~

  8. #8
    Dora Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services

    Michael "Dog3" wrote:
    >
    > We have one. It's huge. We've also got a ton of silver trays,
    > serving
    > pieces etc. We never use it. It's all wrapped in some special
    > plastic stuff to help keep it all from tarnishing. All of it was
    > inherited from one side of the family or other. Don't use it or want
    > it, but can't seem to part with it either. Maybe the niece will
    > make
    > use of it some day.
    >
    > Michael

    I'm in the same boat - a ton of it from my mother-in-law. All
    carefully wrapped and stored away - haven't looked at it in years and
    it'll probably be passed on to one of my kids, both of whom won't want
    it a bit. Can't part with it, though - crazy, isn't it. Same way
    with my mother's beloved things, which I've never used. Sigh.

    Dora


  9. #9
    Felice Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services


    "bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Wed, 27 May 2009 14:50:51 -0400, "Felice" <[email protected]>
    > shouted from the highest rooftop:
    >
    >>Does anyone still maintain a silver tea service? My parents gave me mine
    >>for
    >>a (50's) wedding gift and I spent years polishing it before I found out
    >>that
    >>if I loaned it out for PTA teas the Class Mothers would do the job for me.
    >>
    >>A few years ago, with no more PTA teas in my life, I palmed it off on the
    >>Senior Daughter. She has Tom Sawyered her daughter into keeping it shiny.

    >
    > We had my wife's Georgian sterling silver tea service (plus trays that
    > weighed a tonne) for years. But, like you, she got tired of keeping it
    > polished and asked the kids if they wanted it. Nope ... they said,
    > "sell it and spend the money on a holiday." So that's what we did.
    > Sent it and other unwanted sterling bits and pieces to auction where
    > they made more than enough to send us on our way.


    <snip>

    Smart you! And my guess is that you got a lot more enjoyment out of the trip
    than the silver.

    Felice



  10. #10
    Felice Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services


    "bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > BTW - we only use our dishwasher for two things. After dinner parties
    > and removing tarnish from silverware before dinner parties. Washing
    > silverware by hand just doesn't do the trick.


    Yes, the DW does a good job. But I handwash the hollow-handled knives
    because I understand water can seep inside. Am I nuts?

    Felice



  11. #11
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services


    > A few years ago, with no more PTA teas in my life, I palmed it off on the
    > Senior Daughter. She has Tom Sawyered her daughter into keeping it shiny.
    >
    > Felice


    I have tons of silverplate from my mom, grandmothers and my own
    wedding presents - seldom used any more and no daughters - my sons
    don't have a use for it.

    I wrapped all the pieces in Pacific Silvercloth storage bags (bought
    the fabric and sewed them up myself), and then - ta-da! Put them all
    in some of those Spacebags (TM) and stuck them on the upper shelves of
    my new cupboards in the rec room - out of sight, out of the way, and
    no tarnish. Worked like a charm; the seals are air-tight.

    I've loaned various pieces out over the years to neighbors for
    graduation parties and the like. But the neighborhood doesn't have
    many young people any more, and entertaining has changed, too - much
    more casual now.

    N.

  12. #12
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services

    it'll probably be passed on to one of my kids, both of whom won't want
    > it a bit. *Can't part with it, though - crazy, isn't it. * Same way
    > with my mother's beloved things, which I've never used. *Sigh.
    >
    > Dora


    Unfortunately, even if you did want to put the pieces in an auction,
    unless they have a big name (like Tiffany or Cartier) on them, they
    have very little auction value. OTOH, you can spend a fortune buying
    new.

    I, too, can't let go of mine - but one son will take them if he ever
    owns his own home...along with my engraved sterling flatware service
    for 12.

    N.

  13. #13
    Matthew Malthouse Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services

    On Thu, 28 May 2009 09:40:54 -0400, "Felice" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Yes, the DW does a good job. But I handwash the hollow-handled knives
    > because I understand water can seep inside. Am I nuts?


    Maybe, maybe not, the usual place to find a fault that might allow
    that is at the join between the blade and the handle; a crack you
    can't see on close inspection isn't going to let much in. One
    suggestion is to put them in blade down. Personally I don't worry
    about it.

    Matthew
    --
    Mail to this account goes to the bit bucket.
    In the unlikely event you want to mail me replace usenet with my name

  14. #14
    Matthew Malthouse Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services

    On Thu, 28 May 2009 09:35:49 -0400, "Dora" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Michael "Dog3" wrote:
    > >
    > > We have one. It's huge. We've also got a ton of silver trays,
    > > serving pieces etc. We never use it. It's all wrapped in some special
    > > plastic stuff to help keep it all from tarnishing. All of it was
    > > inherited from one side of the family or other. Don't use it or want
    > > it, but can't seem to part with it either. Maybe the niece will
    > > make use of it some day.
    > >

    > I'm in the same boat - a ton of it from my mother-in-law. All
    > carefully wrapped and stored away - haven't looked at it in years and
    > it'll probably be passed on to one of my kids, both of whom won't want
    > it a bit. Can't part with it, though - crazy, isn't it. Same way
    > with my mother's beloved things, which I've never used. Sigh.


    My landlord maintains that if things aren't used we shouldn't keep
    them. Not a strict rule but it does lead to the silver service being
    used for morning and afternoon tea of a weekend and the silver servers
    coming out of the cupboard every so often.

    The cutlery is sued daily.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/calmeilles/3516583222/


    Matthew
    --
    Mail to this account goes to the bit bucket.
    In the unlikely event you want to mail me replace usenet with my name

  15. #15
    bob Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services

    On Thu, 28 May 2009 09:40:54 -0400, "Felice" <[email protected]>
    shouted from the highest rooftop:

    >
    >"bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >>
    >> BTW - we only use our dishwasher for two things. After dinner parties
    >> and removing tarnish from silverware before dinner parties. Washing
    >> silverware by hand just doesn't do the trick.

    >
    >Yes, the DW does a good job. But I handwash the hollow-handled knives
    >because I understand water can seep inside. Am I nuts?
    >
    >Felice


    I just went down to the dinning room to check our hollow-handled
    knives and found that they are no longer in the silverware drawer.
    According to my wife, they haven't been there for several years
    because we use the far more practical bone-handled stainless steel
    bladed knives - and they definitely don't go in the dishwasher.

    Apparently, the hollow-handled knives are stored somewhere out in the
    garage with the mahogany caddy full of fish knives & servers we don't
    use. Sounds like time to sell off some more of the family silver.

    But from memory, the hollow handles are silver, while the blades are
    stainless. Since they're not one piece I wonder if there's a chance
    that dishwasher water could get into where they're joined?


    --

    una cerveza mas por favor ...

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~
    Wax-up and drop-in of Surfing's Golden Years: <http://www.surfwriter.net>
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~

  16. #16
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Matthew Malthouse <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The cutlery is sued daily.
    > Matthew


    Is its reputation tarnished? "-)
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller - good news 4-6-2009
    "Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle."
    -Philo of Alexandria

  17. #17
    Felice Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services


    "bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Thu, 28 May 2009 09:40:54 -0400, "Felice" <[email protected]>
    > shouted from the highest rooftop:
    >>
    >>"bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected] ..
    >>>
    >>> BTW - we only use our dishwasher for two things. After dinner parties
    >>> and removing tarnish from silverware before dinner parties. Washing
    >>> silverware by hand just doesn't do the trick.

    >>
    >>Yes, the DW does a good job. But I handwash the hollow-handled knives
    >>because I understand water can seep inside. Am I nuts?
    >>
    >>Felice

    >
    > I just went down to the dinning room to check our hollow-handled
    > knives and found that they are no longer in the silverware drawer.
    > According to my wife, they haven't been there for several years
    > because we use the far more practical bone-handled stainless steel
    > bladed knives - and they definitely don't go in the dishwasher.
    >
    > Apparently, the hollow-handled knives are stored somewhere out in the
    > garage with the mahogany caddy full of fish knives & servers we don't
    > use. Sounds like time to sell off some more of the family silver.
    >
    > But from memory, the hollow handles are silver, while the blades are
    > stainless. Since they're not one piece I wonder if there's a chance
    > that dishwasher water could get into where they're joined?


    Seems logical to me. And it's not all that much of a chore to do them by
    hand.

    Nice to hear you have fish knives. Do you have teeny strawberry forks, too?

    Felice



  18. #18
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services

    On Thu, 28 May 2009 09:04:01 -0700 (PDT), Nancy2
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >entertaining has changed, too - much more casual now.


    No kidding! DD is getting married in June and she doesn't have any
    silver (china or crystal) in her registry.


    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  19. #19
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services

    On Wed 27 May 2009 11:50:51a, Felice told us...

    > Does anyone still maintain a silver tea service? My parents gave me mine
    > for a (50's) wedding gift and I spent years polishing it before I found
    > out that if I loaned it out for PTA teas the Class Mothers would do the
    > job for me.
    >
    > A few years ago, with no more PTA teas in my life, I palmed it off on
    > the Senior Daughter. She has Tom Sawyered her daughter into keeping it
    > shiny.
    >
    > Felice


    In the early 1940s my grandparents gifted my parents with a Sterling Grande
    Baroque Tea Set with Tray. At one time my mother used it frequently. Now
    that I have it, most of the time it's displayed in a large Victorian style
    curio cabinet along with an assortment of sterling holloware serving
    pieces, goblets, and accessories. I use an ample quantite of the 3M strips
    to avoid tarnish, but every several years I take them to a silversmith for
    buffing. I have no love of polishing, but do enjoy looking at them.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Large, naked raw carrots are acceptable as food only to those who
    lie in hutches eagerly awaiting Easter. ~Fran Lebowitz




  20. #20
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: Teas and silver services

    On Wed, 27 May 2009 14:50:51 -0400, "Felice" <[email protected]>
    fired up random neurons and synapses to opine:

    >Does anyone still maintain a silver tea service? My parents gave me mine for
    >a (50's) wedding gift and I spent years polishing it before I found out that
    >if I loaned it out for PTA teas the Class Mothers would do the job for me.
    >
    >A few years ago, with no more PTA teas in my life, I palmed it off on the
    >Senior Daughter. She has Tom Sawyered her daughter into keeping it shiny.


    I've been polishing a tea service and a whole bunch of other silver
    pieces I inherited from my mother for 20 years, paying them far more
    attention in the polishing than actually using them. And since I've
    moved to SoCal - and within 2 miles of the ocean - I find the silver
    needs to be wrapped up tight or it needs polishing every time I turn
    around. In addition to the tea service, I may be the only person
    hereabouts who actually owns silver fish forks, fish knives, tea
    spoons, demitasse spoons, silver bun warmer, liquer warmer... we lived
    in England when I was a teenager and my mother went nuts buying
    antique silver.

    Thanks, mom (:-*

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    --

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    - Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"





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