Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 33

Thread: Swiss Chard!

  1. #1
    Omelet Guest

    Default Swiss Chard!

    Swiss Chard is in season right now! Green, Red and Rainbow. ;-d
    The price has been lower than normal. I really need to plant a patch of
    that stuff as I love it so. It's easy to grow.

    I serve it mostly as a side dish by itself, steamed and treated with a
    bit of lemon butter, but also have seriously been enjoying it in soups
    as I've been on a soup kick lately.

    How do others use it please?
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

  2. #2
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Swiss Chard!


    "Omelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    > Swiss Chard is in season right now! Green, Red and Rainbow. ;-d
    > The price has been lower than normal. I really need to plant a patch of
    > that stuff as I love it so. It's easy to grow.
    >
    > I serve it mostly as a side dish by itself, steamed and treated with a
    > bit of lemon butter, but also have seriously been enjoying it in soups
    > as I've been on a soup kick lately.
    >
    > How do others use it please?


    Daughter loves baby pieces in a salad. Alas it is hard to find the baby
    stuff that is not mixed with something else.

    I take the big pieces, cut them in slivers and mix them into a hamburger
    gravy to be served over mashed potatoes or rice. Or I put them in soup.



  3. #3
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Swiss Chard!

    On Feb 1, 1:22*pm, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > Swiss Chard is in season right now! *Green, Red and Rainbow. ;-d
    > The price has been lower than normal. *I really need to plant a patch of
    > that stuff as I love it so. It's easy to grow.
    >
    > I serve it mostly as a side dish by itself, steamed and treated with a
    > bit of lemon butter, but also have seriously been enjoying it in soups
    > as I've been on a soup kick lately.
    >
    > How do others use it please?


    My wife uses it with pasta, so I'm not 100% sure of the recipe.
    Essentially, she cuts up and browns Italian sausage (with fennel),
    then sautes the chard in the grease (adding olive oil if not enough).
    She then stirs in some crumbled goat cheese (or maybe feta?) before
    serving the mixture over the pasta. I'm drawing a blank on any herbs
    or spices she may use.

  4. #4
    Roy Guest

    Default Re: Swiss Chard!

    On Feb 1, 3:15*pm, spamtrap1888 <spamtrap1...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Feb 1, 1:22*pm, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Swiss Chard is in season right now! *Green, Red and Rainbow. ;-d
    > > The price has been lower than normal. *I really need to plant a patchof
    > > that stuff as I love it so. It's easy to grow.

    >
    > > I serve it mostly as a side dish by itself, steamed and treated with a
    > > bit of lemon butter, but also have seriously been enjoying it in soups
    > > as I've been on a soup kick lately.

    >
    > > How do others use it please?

    >
    > My wife uses it with pasta, so I'm not 100% sure of the recipe.
    > Essentially, she cuts up and browns Italian sausage (with fennel),
    > then sautes the chard in the grease (adding olive oil if not enough).
    > She then stirs in some crumbled goat cheese (or maybe feta?) before
    > serving the mixture over the pasta. I'm drawing a blank on any herbs
    > or spices she may use.


    ==
    Clean and rinse in cold water to remove dirt and snail snot. Heat
    enough water to boiling point...boil swiss chard for 10 minutes or so
    in covered pot...drain.

    Serve hot as a vegetable with a daub of butter, dash of white vinegar,
    salt and pepper to taste.

    Love it...grow it every year. Deer love it too and will clean you out
    in no time.
    ==

  5. #5
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Swiss Chard!

    On 2/1/2011 6:38 PM, Roy wrote:

    > Clean and rinse in cold water to remove dirt and snail snot.


    Right there makes me wonder what other greens, or even other growing
    foods snails like? I hadn't given that much thought before. Thank you
    very much. lol


  6. #6
    Don Martinich Guest

    Default Re: Swiss Chard!

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Swiss Chard is in season right now! Green, Red and Rainbow. ;-d
    > The price has been lower than normal. I really need to plant a patch of
    > that stuff as I love it so. It's easy to grow.
    >
    > I serve it mostly as a side dish by itself, steamed and treated with a
    > bit of lemon butter, but also have seriously been enjoying it in soups
    > as I've been on a soup kick lately.
    >
    > How do others use it please?


    I like the leaves sauteed quickly in olive oil with chopped garlic. I
    also prefer it to spinach for making ravioli stuffing.

    D.M.

  7. #7
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Swiss Chard!

    On 2/1/2011 3:22 PM, Omelet wrote:
    > Swiss Chard is in season right now! Green, Red and Rainbow. ;-d
    > The price has been lower than normal. I really need to plant a patch of
    > that stuff as I love it so. It's easy to grow.
    >
    > I serve it mostly as a side dish by itself, steamed and treated with a
    > bit of lemon butter, but also have seriously been enjoying it in soups
    > as I've been on a soup kick lately.
    >
    > How do others use it please?


    About the same way you do Om. Easiest stuff to grow around here, both
    spring and fall. We always have an eight or ten foot row. We eat it in
    salads a lot, steam it lightly and put either vinegar or lemon juice on
    it, in soups and stews. I have successfully dehydrated it and also have
    blanched, froze on a bun sheet, then vacuum bagged for later use. Nuke
    it a short while in the microwave and eat as above.

    Another crop you might consider is New Zealand spinach, has been grown
    in the USA since about 1750. Has fleshy green, triangular leaves and
    reseeds itself very successfully. I like it steamed and I dehydrate a
    goodly sized batch of it every year and then toss a handful into any
    stew or soup I'm making.

    Right now we're harvesting huge heads of cauliflower, made some as
    pickles, steamed some, and had some with garam marsala on it and then
    pan fried. Very tasty. The next head will be made into pickled mixed
    garden vegetables with carrots, turnips, and other veggies from our fall
    garden.

  8. #8
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Swiss Chard!


    "Cheryl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4d48af40$0$25235$[email protected]..
    > On 2/1/2011 6:38 PM, Roy wrote:
    >
    >> Clean and rinse in cold water to remove dirt and snail snot.

    >
    > Right there makes me wonder what other greens, or even other growing foods
    > snails like? I hadn't given that much thought before. Thank you very
    > much. lol


    Something was eating my lemon cucumbers right down to the ground. I can't
    tell you how many times I have planted those. I finally gave up.

    Something else (I assume) bites holes in my bell peppers.



  9. #9
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Swiss Chard!

    On Feb 1, 1:22*pm, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > Swiss Chard is in season right now! *Green, Red and Rainbow. ;-d
    > The price has been lower than normal. *I really need to plant a patch of
    > that stuff as I love it so. It's easy to grow.
    >
    > I serve it mostly as a side dish by itself, steamed and treated with a
    > bit of lemon butter, but also have seriously been enjoying it in soups
    > as I've been on a soup kick lately.
    >
    > How do others use it please?
    > --
    > Peace! Om
    >
    > Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    > "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    > --Robert Heinlien


    I made a savory galette with a bunch of rainbow chard and it was
    YUMMMY.

    Here's the post with the recipe:

    http://groups.google.com/group/rec.f...35b640341045f4

  10. #10
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Swiss Chard!

    In article <ii9vs2$smp$[email protected]>,
    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Omelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news[email protected]..
    > > Swiss Chard is in season right now! Green, Red and Rainbow. ;-d
    > > The price has been lower than normal. I really need to plant a patch of
    > > that stuff as I love it so. It's easy to grow.
    > >
    > > I serve it mostly as a side dish by itself, steamed and treated with a
    > > bit of lemon butter, but also have seriously been enjoying it in soups
    > > as I've been on a soup kick lately.
    > >
    > > How do others use it please?

    >
    > Daughter loves baby pieces in a salad. Alas it is hard to find the baby
    > stuff that is not mixed with something else.


    Cool. I've never seen the baby chard. When I get it going in the garden
    tho', I'll have to try that.

    >
    > I take the big pieces, cut them in slivers and mix them into a hamburger
    > gravy to be served over mashed potatoes or rice. Or I put them in soup.


    Have not tried them as a sauce item.

    Thanks!
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

  11. #11
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Swiss Chard!

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    spamtrap1888 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Feb 1, 1:22*pm, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > Swiss Chard is in season right now! *Green, Red and Rainbow. ;-d
    > > The price has been lower than normal. *I really need to plant a patch of
    > > that stuff as I love it so. It's easy to grow.
    > >
    > > I serve it mostly as a side dish by itself, steamed and treated with a
    > > bit of lemon butter, but also have seriously been enjoying it in soups
    > > as I've been on a soup kick lately.
    > >
    > > How do others use it please?

    >
    > My wife uses it with pasta, so I'm not 100% sure of the recipe.
    > Essentially, she cuts up and browns Italian sausage (with fennel),
    > then sautes the chard in the grease (adding olive oil if not enough).
    > She then stirs in some crumbled goat cheese (or maybe feta?) before
    > serving the mixture over the pasta. I'm drawing a blank on any herbs
    > or spices she may use.


    That's ok. :-) I can handle the spicing! The idea is cool...
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

  12. #12
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Swiss Chard!

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Roy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Feb 1, 3:15*pm, spamtrap1888 <spamtrap1...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > On Feb 1, 1:22*pm, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > >
    > > > Swiss Chard is in season right now! *Green, Red and Rainbow. ;-d
    > > > The price has been lower than normal. *I really need to plant a patch of
    > > > that stuff as I love it so. It's easy to grow.

    > >
    > > > I serve it mostly as a side dish by itself, steamed and treated with a
    > > > bit of lemon butter, but also have seriously been enjoying it in soups
    > > > as I've been on a soup kick lately.

    > >
    > > > How do others use it please?

    > >
    > > My wife uses it with pasta, so I'm not 100% sure of the recipe.
    > > Essentially, she cuts up and browns Italian sausage (with fennel),
    > > then sautes the chard in the grease (adding olive oil if not enough).
    > > She then stirs in some crumbled goat cheese (or maybe feta?) before
    > > serving the mixture over the pasta. I'm drawing a blank on any herbs
    > > or spices she may use.

    >
    > ==
    > Clean and rinse in cold water to remove dirt and snail snot. Heat
    > enough water to boiling point...boil swiss chard for 10 minutes or so
    > in covered pot...drain.
    >
    > Serve hot as a vegetable with a daub of butter, dash of white vinegar,
    > salt and pepper to taste.
    >
    > Love it...grow it every year. Deer love it too and will clean you out
    > in no time.
    > ==


    <laughs> I have deer that graze across the street from me.
    The Border Collie discourages them from jumping my fence to eat my
    plants! :-)

    Get a good dog. Your deer worries will be over!
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

  13. #13
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Swiss Chard!

    In article
    <[email protected]met.ac
    ..uk>,
    Don Martinich <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Swiss Chard is in season right now! Green, Red and Rainbow. ;-d
    > > The price has been lower than normal. I really need to plant a patch of
    > > that stuff as I love it so. It's easy to grow.
    > >
    > > I serve it mostly as a side dish by itself, steamed and treated with a
    > > bit of lemon butter, but also have seriously been enjoying it in soups
    > > as I've been on a soup kick lately.
    > >
    > > How do others use it please?

    >
    > I like the leaves sauteed quickly in olive oil with chopped garlic. I
    > also prefer it to spinach for making ravioli stuffing.
    >
    > D.M.


    Ooh ooh! I love the stuffing idea! :-)

    Thanks!

    One green I've not tried in my spring rolls...
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

  14. #14
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Swiss Chard!

    In article <4d48b8e5$0$32426$88263eea@bl[email protected]>,
    George Shirley <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 2/1/2011 3:22 PM, Omelet wrote:
    > > Swiss Chard is in season right now! Green, Red and Rainbow. ;-d
    > > The price has been lower than normal. I really need to plant a patch of
    > > that stuff as I love it so. It's easy to grow.
    > >
    > > I serve it mostly as a side dish by itself, steamed and treated with a
    > > bit of lemon butter, but also have seriously been enjoying it in soups
    > > as I've been on a soup kick lately.
    > >
    > > How do others use it please?

    >
    > About the same way you do Om. Easiest stuff to grow around here, both
    > spring and fall. We always have an eight or ten foot row. We eat it in
    > salads a lot, steam it lightly and put either vinegar or lemon juice on
    > it, in soups and stews. I have successfully dehydrated it and also have
    > blanched, froze on a bun sheet, then vacuum bagged for later use. Nuke
    > it a short while in the microwave and eat as above.


    Dehydrated??? That's interesting!

    >
    > Another crop you might consider is New Zealand spinach, has been grown
    > in the USA since about 1750. Has fleshy green, triangular leaves and
    > reseeds itself very successfully. I like it steamed and I dehydrate a
    > goodly sized batch of it every year and then toss a handful into any
    > stew or soup I'm making.


    Cool.

    >
    > Right now we're harvesting huge heads of cauliflower, made some as
    > pickles, steamed some, and had some with garam marsala on it and then
    > pan fried. Very tasty. The next head will be made into pickled mixed
    > garden vegetables with carrots, turnips, and other veggies from our fall
    > garden.


    I've not messed with Cauliflower much lately, but there is plenty of it
    in the store for good prices. Last week's thread about pureed has had
    me considering it lately. Cauli' is yummy just steamed and served as is
    or with a little cheese sauce.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

  15. #15
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Swiss Chard!

    In article <iiae4m$vu6$[email protected]>,
    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Cheryl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:4d48af40$0$25235$[email protected]..
    > > On 2/1/2011 6:38 PM, Roy wrote:
    > >
    > >> Clean and rinse in cold water to remove dirt and snail snot.

    > >
    > > Right there makes me wonder what other greens, or even other growing foods
    > > snails like? I hadn't given that much thought before. Thank you very
    > > much. lol

    >
    > Something was eating my lemon cucumbers right down to the ground. I can't
    > tell you how many times I have planted those. I finally gave up.


    Probably squash borers. I've had issues with those too. A little BT is
    a good thing!

    >
    > Something else (I assume) bites holes in my bell peppers.


    BT. Harmless to humans, deadly to larvae of any kind.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

  16. #16
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Swiss Chard!

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    ImStillMags <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Feb 1, 1:22*pm, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > Swiss Chard is in season right now! *Green, Red and Rainbow. ;-d
    > > The price has been lower than normal. *I really need to plant a patch of
    > > that stuff as I love it so. It's easy to grow.
    > >
    > > I serve it mostly as a side dish by itself, steamed and treated with a
    > > bit of lemon butter, but also have seriously been enjoying it in soups
    > > as I've been on a soup kick lately.
    > >
    > > How do others use it please?
    > > --
    > > Peace! Om
    > >
    > > Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    > > "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    > > --Robert Heinlien

    >
    > I made a savory

    with a bunch of rainbow chard and it was
    > YUMMMY.
    >
    > Here's the post with the recipe:
    >
    > <http://groups.google.com/group/rec.food.cooking/browse thread/thread/c3d9fa3b78072f95/ba35b640341045f4?hl=en&lnk=gst&q=here%27s+what+I+d id+with+the+#ba35b640341045f4>


    Not able to follow the link... but thanks!
    I googled "galette" instead as I was unfamiliar with the term. :-)
    I love the concept tho' and will have to attempt it with a rice flour.

    Right now, I'm considering quiche or fritatta with Chard.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

  17. #17
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Swiss Chard!

    On Feb 2, 1:31*am, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:

    > Not able to follow the link... but thanks!
    > I googled "galette" instead as I was unfamiliar with the term. :-)
    > I love the concept tho' and will have to attempt it with a rice flour.



    Sorry about the link thing. Here's the whole post.

    I used my pie crust recipe, the recipe makes 8 single crusts so I had
    some in the freezer.

    Sauteed in bacon fat:
    1/2 medium onion
    1 cup chopped leftover ham
    1 clove garlic
    cooked till onion was softened and garlic was just beginning to color,
    removed from skillet and set aside.

    In same skillet sauteed one bunch of rainbow chard (mixed colors of
    chard) till tender and
    most of the moisture was used up. Count in the bunch of chard was 10
    large leaves. Salted and peppered the chard as it sauteed. Mixed the
    chard with the sauteed onions and ham mixture.

    In another bowl:
    mixed 2 cups of leftover mashed potatoes with
    1 cup of the leftover ricotta cheese
    about 1/3 cup shredded parmesan (the bits I had leftover)
    handful of real bacon bits
    salt and pepper

    Rolled out the pie crust.
    Spread the potato mixture over the crust to within 2 inches of the
    edge.
    Spread the chard ,ham and onion mixture over the potatoes
    Sprinkled about 2 ounces of crumbled feta cheese over the top

    Folded up the sides to make the galette.

    Baked at 400 for about 30 minutes.

    http://picasaweb.google.com/Sitara80...Witch#55503731...
    click forward for more pictures.

    Very tasty if I do say so myself.

  18. #18
    Zeppo Guest

    Default Re: Swiss Chard!



    "Omelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    > In article <4d48b8e5$0$32426$[email protected]>,
    > George Shirley <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 2/1/2011 3:22 PM, Omelet wrote:
    >> > Swiss Chard is in season right now! Green, Red and Rainbow. ;-d
    >> > The price has been lower than normal. I really need to plant a patch
    >> > of
    >> > that stuff as I love it so. It's easy to grow.
    >> >
    >> > I serve it mostly as a side dish by itself, steamed and treated with a
    >> > bit of lemon butter, but also have seriously been enjoying it in soups
    >> > as I've been on a soup kick lately.
    >> >
    >> > How do others use it please?

    >>
    >> About the same way you do Om. Easiest stuff to grow around here, both
    >> spring and fall. We always have an eight or ten foot row. We eat it in
    >> salads a lot, steam it lightly and put either vinegar or lemon juice on
    >> it, in soups and stews. I have successfully dehydrated it and also have
    >> blanched, froze on a bun sheet, then vacuum bagged for later use. Nuke
    >> it a short while in the microwave and eat as above.

    >
    > Dehydrated??? That's interesting!
    >
    >>
    >> Another crop you might consider is New Zealand spinach, has been grown
    >> in the USA since about 1750. Has fleshy green, triangular leaves and
    >> reseeds itself very successfully. I like it steamed and I dehydrate a
    >> goodly sized batch of it every year and then toss a handful into any
    >> stew or soup I'm making.

    >
    > Cool.
    >
    >>
    >> Right now we're harvesting huge heads of cauliflower, made some as
    >> pickles, steamed some, and had some with garam marsala on it and then
    >> pan fried. Very tasty. The next head will be made into pickled mixed
    >> garden vegetables with carrots, turnips, and other veggies from our fall
    >> garden.

    >
    > I've not messed with Cauliflower much lately, but there is plenty of it
    > in the store for good prices. Last week's thread about pureed has had
    > me considering it lately. Cauli' is yummy just steamed and served as is
    > or with a little cheese sauce.
    > --


    Its really nice tossed with oil, S & P and roasted to a nice brown color as
    well.

    Jon


  19. #19
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Swiss Chard!

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    ImStillMags <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Feb 2, 1:31*am, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Not able to follow the link... but thanks!
    > > I googled "galette" instead as I was unfamiliar with the term. :-)
    > > I love the concept tho' and will have to attempt it with a rice flour.

    >
    >
    > Sorry about the link thing. Here's the whole post.


    Okay, I remember that. :-) You were looking for something "simple" to
    do with leftover ham! <lol> Those look lovely.
    >
    > I used my pie crust recipe, the recipe makes 8 single crusts so I had
    > some in the freezer.
    >
    > Sauteed in bacon fat:
    > 1/2 medium onion
    > 1 cup chopped leftover ham
    > 1 clove garlic
    > cooked till onion was softened and garlic was just beginning to color,
    > removed from skillet and set aside.
    >
    > In same skillet sauteed one bunch of rainbow chard (mixed colors of
    > chard) till tender and
    > most of the moisture was used up. Count in the bunch of chard was 10
    > large leaves. Salted and peppered the chard as it sauteed. Mixed the
    > chard with the sauteed onions and ham mixture.
    >
    > In another bowl:
    > mixed 2 cups of leftover mashed potatoes with
    > 1 cup of the leftover ricotta cheese
    > about 1/3 cup shredded parmesan (the bits I had leftover)
    > handful of real bacon bits
    > salt and pepper
    >
    > Rolled out the pie crust.
    > Spread the potato mixture over the crust to within 2 inches of the
    > edge.
    > Spread the chard ,ham and onion mixture over the potatoes
    > Sprinkled about 2 ounces of crumbled feta cheese over the top
    >
    > Folded up the sides to make the galette.
    >
    > Baked at 400 for about 30 minutes.
    >
    > http://picasaweb.google.com/Sitara80...Witch#55503731...
    > click forward for more pictures.
    >
    > Very tasty if I do say so myself.

    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

  20. #20
    Omelet Guest

    Default Cauliflower again (was Re: Swiss Chard!)

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Zeppo" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > I've not messed with Cauliflower much lately, but there is plenty of it
    > > in the store for good prices. Last week's thread about pureed has had
    > > me considering it lately. Cauli' is yummy just steamed and served as is
    > > or with a little cheese sauce.
    > > --

    >
    > Its really nice tossed with oil, S & P and roasted to a nice brown color as
    > well.
    >
    > Jon


    I've never tried roasting it. :-)
    I'll bet the convection oven would work.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32