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Thread: Sushi includes Rice

  1. #1
    Goomba Guest

    Default Sushi includes Rice

    http://www.latimes.com/news/la-fi-la...6087649.column

    latimes.com
    Diabetic's discrimination lawsuit against restaurant is hard to swallow
    A Studio City sushi restaurant is taken to court by an all-you-can-eat
    customer.

    David Lazarus

    8:29 PM PST, February 17, 2011
    Advertisement

    David Martin was in the mood for raw fish, and he liked the deal offered
    by a Studio City sushi restaurant: all you can eat for $28.

    He took a seat at the counter and started ordering. But it turned out
    that Martin didn't really want sushi, which includes rice; he wanted
    all-you-can-eat sashimi, which is just fish. He began picking the
    seafood off the top and leaving the rice.

    Restaurant owner Jay Oh told Martin that if he wanted the
    all-you-can-eat price, he'd have to eat the rice too and not just fill
    up on fish. Martin replied that he has diabetes and that he can't eat rice.

    Oh said he offered to prepare sashimi for Martin. Two orders of sashimi
    cost $25, or $3 less than the all-you-can-eat sushi deal. But Oh said
    Martin declined the offer.

    Martin left the restaurant after being charged a la carte prices for the
    sushi he'd already ordered plus $1 for a cup of green tea.

    Two weeks later, Martin filed suit in Los Angeles County Superior Court.
    It seeks at least $4,000 in damages for the "humiliation, embarrassment
    and mental anguish" Martin says he suffered after being discriminated
    against "on the basis of his disability."

    Discrimination, or shakedown?

    Oh says it's the latter, and is determined to go to trial, even if the
    eventual legal cost tops the $6,000 Martin subsequently demanded to make
    his lawsuit go away.

    "I have to fight this," Oh told me over green tea at A Ca-Shi Sushi
    before the dinner rush. "Why do I have to give this person money? I
    didn't do anything wrong."

    Martin couldn't be reached for comment. But his attorney, Stuart E.
    Cohen, said that "we are not after money, but a change in A Ca-Shi's
    thinking and policy."

    "I would rather like to see A Ca-Shi succeed on a level playing field,
    not a discriminatory one," he said.

    I should note here that I have Type 1 diabetes and I can sympathize with
    the frustration Martin feels in not being able to eat anything he'd
    like. This is a difficult disease to manage, requiring willpower and
    discipline.

    That said, I'm with Oh on this one.

    If it's Oh's policy that you eat everything you're served if you want
    the all-you-can-eat price, then that's the policy. If you don't like it,
    don't go there again. Or pay the a la carte price and eat whatever you
    want. Or order the sashimi for goodness' sake and don't make such a fuss.

    "The rice is part of the all-you-can-eat sushi," Oh said. "If you only
    eat the fish, I would go broke."

    Martin says in his lawsuit that he has Type 2 diabetes, which means his
    body still produces insulin but doesn't process it well. A Type 1
    diabetic, by contrast, no longer produces insulin and must inject the
    hormone before every meal to keep blood sugar levels under control.

    Many people with Type 2 diabetes, including Martin, take pills to treat
    their condition and often try to limit their intake of carbohydrates,
    such as carb-heavy rice.

    Unlike him, I do have to inject insulin before I eat, but that doesn't
    stop me from enjoying sushi, pasta, pizza or other foods bulging with
    carbs. I just dose correctly for the meal. Rice will harm a diabetic
    only if the diabetic chooses to be harmed.

    More to the point, I expect no special favors because of my illness. If
    a restaurant doesn't serve what I want — all-you-can-eat sashimi, say —
    I go somewhere else.

    Yes, diabetes is officially classified as a disability. But it's not
    debilitating. I've met plenty of other people in wheelchairs or with
    seeing-eye dogs who cope with far greater challenges than I face. And I
    seldom hear them complaining about being discriminated against.

    You play the hand you've been dealt.

    Cohen, Martin's attorney, said his client "has frequented numerous sushi
    bars and not once has he ever been demanded to eat rice upon explaining
    that he is diabetic." So go back to those places.

    The only thing Martin has proved with his lawsuit is that he has
    problems accepting other people's quite reasonable rules. The fact that
    he offered to drop his suit in return for a payout of $6,000 isn't
    exactly the hallmark of a civil rights champion.

    The next hearing in the case is scheduled for Feb. 25. Oh's lawyer,
    Joyce J. Cho, said she's filed a motion for the lawsuit to be dismissed
    because it lacks legal merit, but she expects the case to eventually
    come to trial later this year.

    Meanwhile, Martin's attorney said he intends "to reach out and work with
    the American Diabetes Assn. to create local directories of
    diabetic-friendly or not-friendly establishments."

    Perhaps I can help. In my experience, there's no such thing as a
    diabetic-friendly or not-friendly business.

    Just friendly and not-friendly diabetics.

    David Lazarus' column runs Tuesdays and Fridays. He also can be seen
    daily on KTLA-TV Channel 5. Send your tips or feedback to
    [email protected].

    Copyright © 2011, Los Angeles Times

  2. #2
    George Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice

    On 2/25/2011 4:13 AM, Goomba wrote:
    > http://www.latimes.com/news/la-fi-la...6087649.column
    >
    > latimes.com
    > Diabetic's discrimination lawsuit against restaurant is hard to swallow
    > A Studio City sushi restaurant is taken to court by an all-you-can-eat
    > customer.
    >
    > David Lazarus
    >
    > 8:29 PM PST, February 17, 2011
    > Advertisement
    >
    > David Martin was in the mood for raw fish, and he liked the deal offered
    > by a Studio City sushi restaurant: all you can eat for $28.


    I suppose he could have asked if all you can eat sashimi was included
    before being seated?

    >
    > He took a seat at the counter and started ordering. But it turned out
    > that Martin didn't really want sushi, which includes rice; he wanted
    > all-you-can-eat sashimi, which is just fish. He began picking the
    > seafood off the top and leaving the rice.
    >
    > Restaurant owner Jay Oh told Martin that if he wanted the
    > all-you-can-eat price, he'd have to eat the rice too and not just fill
    > up on fish. Martin replied that he has diabetes and that he can't eat rice.
    >
    > Oh said he offered to prepare sashimi for Martin. Two orders of sashimi
    > cost $25, or $3 less than the all-you-can-eat sushi deal. But Oh said
    > Martin declined the offer.
    >
    > Martin left the restaurant after being charged a la carte prices for the
    > sushi he'd already ordered plus $1 for a cup of green tea.
    >
    > Two weeks later, Martin filed suit in Los Angeles County Superior Court.
    > It seeks at least $4,000 in damages for the "humiliation, embarrassment
    > and mental anguish" Martin says he suffered after being discriminated
    > against "on the basis of his disability."
    >
    > Discrimination, or shakedown?
    >
    > Oh says it's the latter, and is determined to go to trial, even if the
    > eventual legal cost tops the $6,000 Martin subsequently demanded to make
    > his lawsuit go away.
    >
    > "I have to fight this," Oh told me over green tea at A Ca-Shi Sushi
    > before the dinner rush. "Why do I have to give this person money? I
    > didn't do anything wrong."
    >
    > Martin couldn't be reached for comment. But his attorney, Stuart E.
    > Cohen, said that "we are not after money, but a change in A Ca-Shi's
    > thinking and policy."


    How horrible, a restaurant owner defines what will be served and the
    terms. Who does he think he is? Shouldn't people be able to get whatever
    they want without rules?

    >
    > "I would rather like to see A Ca-Shi succeed on a level playing field,
    > not a discriminatory one," he said.
    >
    > I should note here that I have Type 1 diabetes and I can sympathize with
    > the frustration Martin feels in not being able to eat anything he'd
    > like. This is a difficult disease to manage, requiring willpower and
    > discipline.
    >
    > That said, I'm with Oh on this one.
    >
    > If it's Oh's policy that you eat everything you're served if you want
    > the all-you-can-eat price, then that's the policy. If you don't like it,
    > don't go there again. Or pay the a la carte price and eat whatever you
    > want. Or order the sashimi for goodness' sake and don't make such a fuss.
    >
    > "The rice is part of the all-you-can-eat sushi," Oh said. "If you only
    > eat the fish, I would go broke."
    >
    > Martin says in his lawsuit that he has Type 2 diabetes, which means his
    > body still produces insulin but doesn't process it well. A Type 1
    > diabetic, by contrast, no longer produces insulin and must inject the
    > hormone before every meal to keep blood sugar levels under control.
    >
    > Many people with Type 2 diabetes, including Martin, take pills to treat
    > their condition and often try to limit their intake of carbohydrates,
    > such as carb-heavy rice.
    >
    > Unlike him, I do have to inject insulin before I eat, but that doesn't
    > stop me from enjoying sushi, pasta, pizza or other foods bulging with
    > carbs. I just dose correctly for the meal. Rice will harm a diabetic
    > only if the diabetic chooses to be harmed.
    >
    > More to the point, I expect no special favors because of my illness. If
    > a restaurant doesn't serve what I want — all-you-can-eat sashimi, say —
    > I go somewhere else.
    >
    > Yes, diabetes is officially classified as a disability. But it's not
    > debilitating. I've met plenty of other people in wheelchairs or with
    > seeing-eye dogs who cope with far greater challenges than I face. And I
    > seldom hear them complaining about being discriminated against.
    >
    > You play the hand you've been dealt.
    >
    > Cohen, Martin's attorney, said his client "has frequented numerous sushi
    > bars and not once has he ever been demanded to eat rice upon explaining
    > that he is diabetic." So go back to those places.
    >
    > The only thing Martin has proved with his lawsuit is that he has
    > problems accepting other people's quite reasonable rules. The fact that
    > he offered to drop his suit in return for a payout of $6,000 isn't
    > exactly the hallmark of a civil rights champion.


    But shouldn't people be able to invent their own rules if they don't
    like existing rules?

    >
    > The next hearing in the case is scheduled for Feb. 25. Oh's lawyer,
    > Joyce J. Cho, said she's filed a motion for the lawsuit to be dismissed
    > because it lacks legal merit, but she expects the case to eventually
    > come to trial later this year.
    >
    > Meanwhile, Martin's attorney said he intends "to reach out and work with
    > the American Diabetes Assn. to create local directories of
    > diabetic-friendly or not-friendly establishments."



    Is this before or after he adds another Mercedes SL65 to his collection
    for being a sleezeball attorney?

    >
    > Perhaps I can help. In my experience, there's no such thing as a
    > diabetic-friendly or not-friendly business.
    >
    > Just friendly and not-friendly diabetics.
    >
    > David Lazarus' column runs Tuesdays and Fridays. He also can be seen
    > daily on KTLA-TV Channel 5. Send your tips or feedback to
    > [email protected].
    >
    > Copyright © 2011, Los Angeles Times



  3. #3
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice

    On Fri, 25 Feb 2011 04:13:35 -0500, Goomba <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >http://www.latimes.com/news/la-fi-la...6087649.column
    >
    >latimes.com
    >Diabetic's discrimination lawsuit against restaurant is hard to swallow
    >A Studio City sushi restaurant is taken to court by an all-you-can-eat
    >customer.
    >
    >David Lazarus
    >
    >8:29 PM PST, February 17, 2011
    >Advertisement
    >
    >David Martin was in the mood for raw fish, and he liked the deal offered
    >by a Studio City sushi restaurant: all you can eat for $28.
    >
    >He took a seat at the counter and started ordering. But it turned out
    >that Martin didn't really want sushi, which includes rice; he wanted
    >all-you-can-eat sashimi, which is just fish. He began picking the
    >seafood off the top and leaving the rice.
    >
    >Restaurant owner Jay Oh told Martin that if he wanted the
    >all-you-can-eat price, he'd have to eat the rice too and not just fill
    >up on fish. Martin replied that he has diabetes and that he can't eat rice.
    >
    >Oh said he offered to prepare sashimi for Martin. Two orders of sashimi
    >cost $25, or $3 less than the all-you-can-eat sushi deal. But Oh said
    >Martin declined the offer.
    >
    >Martin left the restaurant after being charged a la carte prices for the
    >sushi he'd already ordered plus $1 for a cup of green tea.
    >
    >Two weeks later, Martin filed suit in Los Angeles County Superior Court.
    >It seeks at least $4,000 in damages for the "humiliation, embarrassment
    >and mental anguish" Martin says he suffered after being discriminated
    >against "on the basis of his disability."
    >
    >Discrimination, or shakedown?
    >
    >Oh says it's the latter, and is determined to go to trial, even if the
    >eventual legal cost tops the $6,000 Martin subsequently demanded to make
    >his lawsuit go away.
    >
    >"I have to fight this," Oh told me over green tea at A Ca-Shi Sushi
    >before the dinner rush. "Why do I have to give this person money? I
    >didn't do anything wrong."
    >
    >Martin couldn't be reached for comment. But his attorney, Stuart E.
    >Cohen, said that "we are not after money, but a change in A Ca-Shi's
    >thinking and policy."
    >
    >"I would rather like to see A Ca-Shi succeed on a level playing field,
    >not a discriminatory one," he said.
    >
    >I should note here that I have Type 1 diabetes and I can sympathize with
    >the frustration Martin feels in not being able to eat anything he'd
    >like. This is a difficult disease to manage, requiring willpower and
    >discipline.
    >
    >That said, I'm with Oh on this one.
    >
    >If it's Oh's policy that you eat everything you're served if you want
    >the all-you-can-eat price, then that's the policy. If you don't like it,
    >don't go there again. Or pay the a la carte price and eat whatever you
    >want. Or order the sashimi for goodness' sake and don't make such a fuss.
    >
    >"The rice is part of the all-you-can-eat sushi," Oh said. "If you only
    >eat the fish, I would go broke."
    >
    >Martin says in his lawsuit that he has Type 2 diabetes, which means his
    >body still produces insulin but doesn't process it well. A Type 1
    >diabetic, by contrast, no longer produces insulin and must inject the
    >hormone before every meal to keep blood sugar levels under control.
    >
    >Many people with Type 2 diabetes, including Martin, take pills to treat
    >their condition and often try to limit their intake of carbohydrates,
    >such as carb-heavy rice.
    >
    >Unlike him, I do have to inject insulin before I eat, but that doesn't
    >stop me from enjoying sushi, pasta, pizza or other foods bulging with
    >carbs. I just dose correctly for the meal. Rice will harm a diabetic
    >only if the diabetic chooses to be harmed.
    >
    >More to the point, I expect no special favors because of my illness. If
    >a restaurant doesn't serve what I want — all-you-can-eat sashimi, say —
    >I go somewhere else.
    >
    >Yes, diabetes is officially classified as a disability. But it's not
    >debilitating. I've met plenty of other people in wheelchairs or with
    >seeing-eye dogs who cope with far greater challenges than I face. And I
    >seldom hear them complaining about being discriminated against.
    >
    >You play the hand you've been dealt.
    >
    >Cohen, Martin's attorney, said his client "has frequented numerous sushi
    >bars and not once has he ever been demanded to eat rice upon explaining
    >that he is diabetic." So go back to those places.
    >
    >The only thing Martin has proved with his lawsuit is that he has
    >problems accepting other people's quite reasonable rules. The fact that
    >he offered to drop his suit in return for a payout of $6,000 isn't
    >exactly the hallmark of a civil rights champion.
    >
    >The next hearing in the case is scheduled for Feb. 25. Oh's lawyer,
    >Joyce J. Cho, said she's filed a motion for the lawsuit to be dismissed
    >because it lacks legal merit, but she expects the case to eventually
    >come to trial later this year.
    >
    >Meanwhile, Martin's attorney said he intends "to reach out and work with
    >the American Diabetes Assn. to create local directories of
    >diabetic-friendly or not-friendly establishments."
    >
    >Perhaps I can help. In my experience, there's no such thing as a
    >diabetic-friendly or not-friendly business.
    >
    >Just friendly and not-friendly diabetics.
    >
    >David Lazarus' column runs Tuesdays and Fridays. He also can be seen
    >daily on KTLA-TV Channel 5. Send your tips or feedback to
    >[email protected]
    >
    >Copyright © 2011, Los Angeles Times


    First the litigant would need to prove that diabetes is a
    disability... diabetes is no more a disability than zits/acne.
    In any other state the courts would not hear this case, but the
    California judicial system is more ****ed up than Libya's.

    At every "All You Can Eat" restaurant I've ever been to the
    establishment has the right not to serve patrons when they don't eat
    what they take. At Las Vegas 'all you can eats' I've seen them escort
    folks to the door when they left plates heaped with food while going
    to get more. In US military mess halls there is always a large sign:
    "Take All You Want, Eat All You Take". He took the rice, he has to
    eat it all to be served more. Even Nathan's Famous hot dog eating
    contest requires that entrants eat the entire bun before grabbing the
    next dawg. In NY that putz would be tarred, rolled in rice, and rode
    out of town on a rail with a fistful of wasabi stuffed up his ass.

  4. #4
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice

    On 2/25/2011 10:12 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    > On Fri, 25 Feb 2011 04:13:35 -0500, Goomba<[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> http://www.latimes.com/news/la-fi-la...6087649.column
    >>
    >> latimes.com
    >> Diabetic's discrimination lawsuit against restaurant is hard to swallow
    >> A Studio City sushi restaurant is taken to court by an all-you-can-eat
    >> customer.
    >>
    >> David Lazarus
    >>
    >> 8:29 PM PST, February 17, 2011
    >> Advertisement
    >>
    >> David Martin was in the mood for raw fish, and he liked the deal offered
    >> by a Studio City sushi restaurant: all you can eat for $28.
    >>
    >> He took a seat at the counter and started ordering. But it turned out
    >> that Martin didn't really want sushi, which includes rice; he wanted
    >> all-you-can-eat sashimi, which is just fish. He began picking the
    >> seafood off the top and leaving the rice.
    >>
    >> Restaurant owner Jay Oh told Martin that if he wanted the
    >> all-you-can-eat price, he'd have to eat the rice too and not just fill
    >> up on fish. Martin replied that he has diabetes and that he can't eat rice.
    >>
    >> Oh said he offered to prepare sashimi for Martin. Two orders of sashimi
    >> cost $25, or $3 less than the all-you-can-eat sushi deal. But Oh said
    >> Martin declined the offer.
    >>
    >> Martin left the restaurant after being charged a la carte prices for the
    >> sushi he'd already ordered plus $1 for a cup of green tea.
    >>
    >> Two weeks later, Martin filed suit in Los Angeles County Superior Court.
    >> It seeks at least $4,000 in damages for the "humiliation, embarrassment
    >> and mental anguish" Martin says he suffered after being discriminated
    >> against "on the basis of his disability."
    >>
    >> Discrimination, or shakedown?
    >>
    >> Oh says it's the latter, and is determined to go to trial, even if the
    >> eventual legal cost tops the $6,000 Martin subsequently demanded to make
    >> his lawsuit go away.
    >>
    >> "I have to fight this," Oh told me over green tea at A Ca-Shi Sushi
    >> before the dinner rush. "Why do I have to give this person money? I
    >> didn't do anything wrong."
    >>
    >> Martin couldn't be reached for comment. But his attorney, Stuart E.
    >> Cohen, said that "we are not after money, but a change in A Ca-Shi's
    >> thinking and policy."
    >>
    >> "I would rather like to see A Ca-Shi succeed on a level playing field,
    >> not a discriminatory one," he said.
    >>
    >> I should note here that I have Type 1 diabetes and I can sympathize with
    >> the frustration Martin feels in not being able to eat anything he'd
    >> like. This is a difficult disease to manage, requiring willpower and
    >> discipline.
    >>
    >> That said, I'm with Oh on this one.
    >>
    >> If it's Oh's policy that you eat everything you're served if you want
    >> the all-you-can-eat price, then that's the policy. If you don't like it,
    >> don't go there again. Or pay the a la carte price and eat whatever you
    >> want. Or order the sashimi for goodness' sake and don't make such a fuss.
    >>
    >> "The rice is part of the all-you-can-eat sushi," Oh said. "If you only
    >> eat the fish, I would go broke."
    >>
    >> Martin says in his lawsuit that he has Type 2 diabetes, which means his
    >> body still produces insulin but doesn't process it well. A Type 1
    >> diabetic, by contrast, no longer produces insulin and must inject the
    >> hormone before every meal to keep blood sugar levels under control.
    >>
    >> Many people with Type 2 diabetes, including Martin, take pills to treat
    >> their condition and often try to limit their intake of carbohydrates,
    >> such as carb-heavy rice.
    >>
    >> Unlike him, I do have to inject insulin before I eat, but that doesn't
    >> stop me from enjoying sushi, pasta, pizza or other foods bulging with
    >> carbs. I just dose correctly for the meal. Rice will harm a diabetic
    >> only if the diabetic chooses to be harmed.
    >>
    >> More to the point, I expect no special favors because of my illness. If
    >> a restaurant doesn't serve what I want — all-you-can-eat sashimi, say —
    >> I go somewhere else.
    >>
    >> Yes, diabetes is officially classified as a disability. But it's not
    >> debilitating. I've met plenty of other people in wheelchairs or with
    >> seeing-eye dogs who cope with far greater challenges than I face. And I
    >> seldom hear them complaining about being discriminated against.
    >>
    >> You play the hand you've been dealt.
    >>
    >> Cohen, Martin's attorney, said his client "has frequented numerous sushi
    >> bars and not once has he ever been demanded to eat rice upon explaining
    >> that he is diabetic." So go back to those places.
    >>
    >> The only thing Martin has proved with his lawsuit is that he has
    >> problems accepting other people's quite reasonable rules. The fact that
    >> he offered to drop his suit in return for a payout of $6,000 isn't
    >> exactly the hallmark of a civil rights champion.
    >>
    >> The next hearing in the case is scheduled for Feb. 25. Oh's lawyer,
    >> Joyce J. Cho, said she's filed a motion for the lawsuit to be dismissed
    >> because it lacks legal merit, but she expects the case to eventually
    >> come to trial later this year.
    >>
    >> Meanwhile, Martin's attorney said he intends "to reach out and work with
    >> the American Diabetes Assn. to create local directories of
    >> diabetic-friendly or not-friendly establishments."
    >>
    >> Perhaps I can help. In my experience, there's no such thing as a
    >> diabetic-friendly or not-friendly business.
    >>
    >> Just friendly and not-friendly diabetics.
    >>
    >> David Lazarus' column runs Tuesdays and Fridays. He also can be seen
    >> daily on KTLA-TV Channel 5. Send your tips or feedback to
    >> [email protected].
    >>
    >> Copyright © 2011, Los Angeles Times

    >
    > First the litigant would need to prove that diabetes is a
    > disability... diabetes is no more a disability than zits/acne.
    > In any other state the courts would not hear this case, but the
    > California judicial system is more ****ed up than Libya's.
    >
    > At every "All You Can Eat" restaurant I've ever been to the
    > establishment has the right not to serve patrons when they don't eat
    > what they take. At Las Vegas 'all you can eats' I've seen them escort
    > folks to the door when they left plates heaped with food while going
    > to get more. In US military mess halls there is always a large sign:
    > "Take All You Want, Eat All You Take". He took the rice, he has to
    > eat it all to be served more. Even Nathan's Famous hot dog eating
    > contest requires that entrants eat the entire bun before grabbing the
    > next dawg. In NY that putz would be tarred, rolled in rice, and rode
    > out of town on a rail with a fistful of wasabi stuffed up his ass.


    I have to admit that the two Japanese buffets around here that I like
    each have notices saying approximately "We do not serve sashimi in the
    buffet. Anyone not eating the rice will incur an extra charge." This
    seems entirely reasonable to me. It is unfortunate that someone may have
    to avoid a sushi buffet because of this policy but that is hardly a
    great imposition or a discrimination. I don't think I want to know the
    litigious Mr. Martin.

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    "Not": obvious change in "Reply To"

  5. #5
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice

    "Goomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > http://www.latimes.com/news/la-fi-la...6087649.column
    >
    > latimes.com
    > Diabetic's discrimination lawsuit against restaurant is hard to swallow
    > A Studio City sushi restaurant is taken to court by an all-you-can-eat
    > customer.
    >
    > David Lazarus
    >
    > 8:29 PM PST, February 17, 2011
    > Advertisement
    >
    > David Martin was in the mood for raw fish, and he liked the deal offered
    > by a Studio City sushi restaurant: all you can eat for $28.
    >
    > He took a seat at the counter and started ordering. But it turned out that
    > Martin didn't really want sushi, which includes rice; he wanted
    > all-you-can-eat sashimi, which is just fish. He began picking the seafood
    > off the top and leaving the rice.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sushi

    Sushi (すし、寿司, 鮨, 鮓, 寿斗, 寿し, 壽司?) is a Japanese dish consisting of cooked
    vinegared rice which is commonly topped with other ingredients, such as fish
    or other seafood,[1] or put into rolls. Sliced raw fish by itself is called
    sashimi, as distinct from sushi. Sushi that is served rolled inside or
    around nori, dried and pressed sheets of seaweed, is makizushi. Toppings
    stuffed into a small pouch of fried tofu is inarizushi. A bowl of sushi rice
    with toppings scattered over it is called chirashizushi.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sashimi

    Sashimi (Japanese: 刺身, pronounced [saɕimiꜜ]; English: /səˈʃiːmiː/) is a
    Japanese delicacy. It primarily consists of very fresh raw seafood, sliced
    into thin pieces, and served only with a dipping sauce (soy sauce with
    wasabi paste or such condiments as grated fresh ginger, or ponzu), and such
    garnishes as shiso and shredded daikon radish. Dimensions vary but are
    typically about 2.5 cm (1") wide by 4 cm (1.5") long by 0.5 cm (0.2") thick.
    The word sashimi means "pierced body", i.e. "刺身 = sashimi = 刺し = sashi
    (pierced, stuck) and 身 = mi (body, meat). This word dates from the Muromachi
    period, and was possibly coined when the word "切る = kiru (cut), the culinary
    step, was considered too inauspicious to be used by anyone other than
    Samurai. This word may derive from the culinary practice of sticking the
    fish's tail and fin to the slices in identifying the fish being eaten.


    The patron is an idiot!

    Dimitri











  6. #6
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice

    Goomba wrote:

    > Martin says in his lawsuit that he has Type 2 diabetes, which means
    > his body still produces insulin but doesn't process it well. A Type 1
    > diabetic, by contrast, no longer produces insulin and must inject the
    > hormone before every meal to keep blood sugar levels under control.
    >
    > Many people with Type 2 diabetes, including Martin, take pills to
    > treat their condition and often try to limit their intake of
    > carbohydrates, such as carb-heavy rice.
    >
    > Unlike him, I do have to inject insulin before I eat, but that doesn't
    > stop me from enjoying sushi, pasta, pizza or other foods bulging with
    > carbs. I just dose correctly for the meal. Rice will harm a diabetic
    > only if the diabetic chooses to be harmed.


    Generally I agree. But...a T2 who is not on insulin has NO WAY to "cover"
    the carbs in the rice. The pill most commonly taken by a T2, metformin, does
    not cover extra carbs with extra insulin production. (Leaving aside the
    issue of insulin resistance, which aflicts most T2s.) So the only way a T2
    who is not on insulin can avoid being "harmed" by rice is not to eat it, or
    to eat only the small amount that will not produce a BG spike over 140,
    probably no more than 1/4-1/3 cup at most.

    The restaurant owner should have explained his policy to the customer
    diplomatically--and privately--for future reference, and if it was such a
    big deal seen to it that the menu stated the policy in the future. He
    should have let this one go. One customer eating fish was not going to break
    him. What does this guy do when a customer sends a dish back? Refuse to
    take it because if everyone did he would go broke? I doubt it.

    > More to the point, I expect no special favors because of my illness.
    > If a restaurant doesn't serve what I want — all-you-can-eat sashimi, say
    > — I go somewhere else.


    I agree. (I'm a T2, BTW.) I also agree that this was not worth a lawsuit.
    Seems to me that both parties are acting like jerks: a restaurant owner who
    won't accomodate a single customer, and a customer who is litigation-happy.



  7. #7
    Alfie Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice

    On Feb 25, 4:13*am, Goomba <Goomb...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > http://www.latimes.com/news/la-fi-la...6087649.column
    >
    > latimes.com
    > Diabetic's discrimination lawsuit against restaurant is hard to swallow
    > A Studio City sushi restaurant is taken to court by an all-you-can-eat
    > customer.


    > David Martin was in the mood for raw fish, and he liked the deal offered
    > by a Studio City sushi restaurant: all you can eat for $28.
    >
    > He took a seat at the counter and started ordering. But it turned out
    > that Martin didn't really want sushi, which includes rice; he wanted
    > all-you-can-eat sashimi, which is just fish. He began picking the
    > seafood off the top and leaving the rice.
    >
    > Restaurant owner Jay Oh told Martin that if he wanted the
    > all-you-can-eat price, he'd have to eat the rice too and not just fill
    > up on fish. Martin replied that he has diabetes and that he can't eat rice.


    This would be the equivalent of going to an "AYCE" spaghetti and
    meatballs place and eating only the meatballs while sending the plate-
    fulls of spaghetti to the trash when ordering another serving. His
    lawsuit is pure nonsense and will be seen as such by the court.

    Sashimi is a specific food. Sushi is also a specific food as shown by
    others posts already. As with my example above, if one wants a meal of
    meatballs or a meal of just sashimi, one should go where those items
    are available for serving and order them. If one goes to a restaurant
    that is serving sushi, and eats only sashimi, than one is not eating
    what is offered, but trying to substitute their wishes for what the
    offer is.

    His diabetes really has nothing to do with the issue. If one is
    allergic to shellfish, one does not go to an AYCE surf and turf and
    say; "I'll just have plate after plate of steak. I don't want the
    shellfish because I'm allergic to them. It would be a blatant
    disregard of the offer in an attempt to substitute something that was
    not offered.

    If one can't eat rice, then logic and common sense should tell them to
    not go to a place offering all you can eat RICE and fish. To do so
    would be plain stupid.

    If a restaurant were to offer "All you can eat steak and wine with the
    meal", then one can't go there and say; "I'm a vegetarian, I don't eat
    meat, but I'll drink wine all evening for the price of your offer".
    Rightfully, it wouldn't work anywhere. This is nothing more than
    another version of that example.

  8. #8
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice

    "Janet" wrote:
    >
    >Seems to me that both parties are acting like jerks: a restaurant owner who
    >won't accomodate a single customer, and a customer who is litigation-happy.


    What nonsense. You were obviously raised with no ethics/morals.

    A restaurant owner is not required to accomodate that kind
    piggish/*THIEVING* behavior... anyone who can't eat rice needs to
    order food other than a dish that is essentially rice (shoulda
    patronized an all you can eat vienna sausage buffet). The patron is
    obviously a thief and a douchebag. What this thieving douchebag did
    was tantamount to patronizing an all you can eat lobster bisque, and
    bowl after bowl picking out whatever tidbits of lobster and telling
    the proprietor he can either flush the rest or shove it. This
    thieving douchebag patron needs to be punished the same as any common
    thief... a big fat fine and a long stretch in the slammer. But it's
    CA, ALL uneducated slimeballs.

  9. #9
    I_am_Tosk Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice

    In article <[email protected]>, Brooklyn1
    says...
    >
    > "Janet" wrote:
    > >
    > >Seems to me that both parties are acting like jerks: a restaurant owner who
    > >won't accomodate a single customer, and a customer who is litigation-happy.

    >
    > What nonsense. You were obviously raised with no ethics/morals.
    >
    > A restaurant owner is not required to accomodate that kind
    > piggish/*THIEVING* behavior... anyone who can't eat rice needs to
    > order food other than a dish that is essentially rice (shoulda
    > patronized an all you can eat vienna sausage buffet). The patron is
    > obviously a thief and a douchebag. What this thieving douchebag did
    > was tantamount to patronizing an all you can eat lobster bisque, and
    > bowl after bowl picking out whatever tidbits of lobster and telling
    > the proprietor he can either flush the rest or shove it. This
    > thieving douchebag patron needs to be punished the same as any common
    > thief... a big fat fine and a long stretch in the slammer. But it's
    > CA, ALL uneducated slimeballs.


    Maybe the owner should note to the judge, the English translation of the
    word Sushi. From what I am told by my daughter who has lived "over
    there". Sushi literally means, "Vinegar RICE"! Correct me if I am wrong,
    but I don't think I am.

  10. #10
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice

    Goomba quoted:
    >
    > http://www.latimes.com/news/la-fi-la...6087649.column
    >
    > latimes.com
    > Diabetic's discrimination lawsuit against restaurant is hard to swallow
    > A Studio City sushi restaurant is taken to court by an all-you-can-eat
    > customer.
    > ...
    > If it's Oh's policy that you eat everything you're served if you want
    > the all-you-can-eat price, then that's the policy. If you don't like it,
    > don't go there again. Or pay the a la carte price and eat whatever you
    > want. Or order the sashimi for goodness' sake and don't make such a fuss.


    I've been to several sushi buffet places including Todai which is a
    small chain that competes with Oh. There's even a Todai here in the
    Chicago burbs that I have been to.

    > Cohen, Martin's attorney, said his client "has frequented numerous sushi
    > bars and not once has he ever been demanded to eat rice upon explaining
    > that he is diabetic." So go back to those places.


    Good luck with that, though. Name one such place. Seriously. Without
    exception any buffet place I've ever been to has had a sign that says
    something like "There is an extra charge for not eating the sushi rice".
    If he wants to name such a place that doesn't have that sign I want to
    see it.

    > The only thing Martin has proved with his lawsuit is that he has
    > problems accepting other people's quite reasonable rules. The fact that
    > he offered to drop his suit in return for a payout of $6,000 isn't
    > exactly the hallmark of a civil rights champion.


    I also want to set up a bet with him that I can bother to notice my
    surroundings unlike him and so I can show him a photograph of the
    sign. I'll get his $6000 back that way and enjoy a bunch of sushi on
    his dime! Who knows, maybe he's as gullible as the story makes him
    seem.

    > Perhaps I can help. In my experience, there's no such thing as a
    > diabetic-friendly or not-friendly business.
    >
    > Just friendly and not-friendly diabetics.


    This also applies to other dietary restrictions. I'm wheat intolerant.
    I never expect anyone to go out of their way to accomidate me on that.
    When at a restaurant I scan the menu, mentally erase anything that
    probably has wheat in it, then I around from the remaining items. I
    never fail to find food I can digest without symptoms at restaurants. I
    have been to places where my choices were chicken caesar salad no
    croutons or house salad no croutons but usually they have at least one
    thing I can eat. Good thing I love genuine Buffalo style chickne wings
    never breaded never dedged ...

  11. #11
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice

    On 2/25/2011 3:17 PM, I_am_Tosk wrote:
    > In article<[email protected] >, Brooklyn1
    > says...
    >>
    >> "Janet" wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Seems to me that both parties are acting like jerks: a restaurant owner who
    >>> won't accomodate a single customer, and a customer who is litigation-happy.

    >>
    >> What nonsense. You were obviously raised with no ethics/morals.
    >>
    >> A restaurant owner is not required to accomodate that kind
    >> piggish/*THIEVING* behavior... anyone who can't eat rice needs to
    >> order food other than a dish that is essentially rice (shoulda
    >> patronized an all you can eat vienna sausage buffet). The patron is
    >> obviously a thief and a douchebag. What this thieving douchebag did
    >> was tantamount to patronizing an all you can eat lobster bisque, and
    >> bowl after bowl picking out whatever tidbits of lobster and telling
    >> the proprietor he can either flush the rest or shove it. This
    >> thieving douchebag patron needs to be punished the same as any common
    >> thief... a big fat fine and a long stretch in the slammer. But it's
    >> CA, ALL uneducated slimeballs.

    >
    > Maybe the owner should note to the judge, the English translation of the
    > word Sushi. From what I am told by my daughter who has lived "over
    > there". Sushi literally means, "Vinegar RICE"! Correct me if I am wrong,
    > but I don't think I am.


    I think the dictionary regarded as the ultimate standard, the Oxford
    English Dictionary, would agree with you. It gives "A Japanese dish
    consisting of small balls of cold boiled rice flavoured with vinegar and
    commonly garnished with slices of fish or cooked egg. Also attrib. Hence
    sushiya (suija), in Japan, a shop which serves sushi."


    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    "Not": obvious change in "Reply To"

  12. #12
    George Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice

    On 2/25/2011 3:17 PM, I_am_Tosk wrote:
    > In article<[email protected] >, Brooklyn1
    > says...
    >>
    >> "Janet" wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Seems to me that both parties are acting like jerks: a restaurant owner who
    >>> won't accomodate a single customer, and a customer who is litigation-happy.

    >>
    >> What nonsense. You were obviously raised with no ethics/morals.
    >>
    >> A restaurant owner is not required to accomodate that kind
    >> piggish/*THIEVING* behavior... anyone who can't eat rice needs to
    >> order food other than a dish that is essentially rice (shoulda
    >> patronized an all you can eat vienna sausage buffet). The patron is
    >> obviously a thief and a douchebag. What this thieving douchebag did
    >> was tantamount to patronizing an all you can eat lobster bisque, and
    >> bowl after bowl picking out whatever tidbits of lobster and telling
    >> the proprietor he can either flush the rest or shove it. This
    >> thieving douchebag patron needs to be punished the same as any common
    >> thief... a big fat fine and a long stretch in the slammer. But it's
    >> CA, ALL uneducated slimeballs.

    >
    > Maybe the owner should note to the judge, the English translation of the
    > word Sushi. From what I am told by my daughter who has lived "over
    > there". Sushi literally means, "Vinegar RICE"! Correct me if I am wrong,
    > but I don't think I am.


    I have been to Japan on numerous occasions and the meaning you noted is
    correct. Also I have never been in a place offering an all you can eat
    sushi meal that didn't explicitly note that you must eat everything you
    order.

  13. #13
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice


    Gorio wrote:
    >
    > Another war over syntax.
    >
    > I was always taught that suchi was the actual name for the rice cooked
    > perfectly and seasoned perfectly wiht rice vinegar. Sichi IS the rice,
    > oft combined with sashimi or even vegetation.
    >
    > I'm no expert but I hope this A-hole blows a bunch of money on lawyers
    > for nothing and a counter suite brings great rewards for the restaurant
    > owner. This frivolous crap has to stop.


    Presumably the restaurant will benefit from the publicity, certainly
    from those who know that sushi is the rice.

  14. #14
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice

    On Fri, 25 Feb 2011 08:58:51 -0500, George <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > How horrible, a restaurant owner defines what will be served and the
    > terms.


    The courts packed, so I'm surprise that complaint wasn't 86'd as a
    frivolous lawsuit immediately.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  15. #15
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice

    On 2/25/2011 5:24 AM, James Silverton wrote:
    > I have to admit that the two Japanese buffets around here that I like
    > each have notices saying approximately "We do not serve sashimi in the
    > buffet. Anyone not eating the rice will incur an extra charge." This
    > seems entirely reasonable to me. It is unfortunate that someone may have
    > to avoid a sushi buffet because of this policy but that is hardly a
    > great imposition or a discrimination. I don't think I want to know the
    > litigious Mr. Martin.
    >


    I've never seen a sign like that at the restaurants where I'll eat sushi
    - thank God! That's rather insulting.

    OTOH, I like mushrooms but my doc has told me to stay away from
    foods that will give me a fat ass so when I get the craving for
    mushrooms, I'll always head down to the nearest all you can eat pizza
    buffet and dig in, or rather dig in and pick out then throw the pizza
    away. There's nothing quite as tasty as mushroom baked on a bed of
    cheese and tomato sauce. Yummy!

  16. #16
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice

    On 2/25/2011 5:59 PM, dsi1 wrote:
    > On 2/25/2011 5:24 AM, James Silverton wrote:
    >> I have to admit that the two Japanese buffets around here that I like
    >> each have notices saying approximately "We do not serve sashimi in the
    >> buffet. Anyone not eating the rice will incur an extra charge." This
    >> seems entirely reasonable to me. It is unfortunate that someone may have
    >> to avoid a sushi buffet because of this policy but that is hardly a
    >> great imposition or a discrimination. I don't think I want to know the
    >> litigious Mr. Martin.
    >>

    >
    > I've never seen a sign like that at the restaurants where I'll eat sushi
    > - thank God! That's rather insulting.
    >
    > OTOH, I like mushrooms but my doc has told me to stay away from
    > foods that will give me a fat ass so when I get the craving for
    > mushrooms, I'll always head down to the nearest all you can eat pizza
    > buffet and dig in, or rather dig in and pick out then throw the pizza
    > away. There's nothing quite as tasty as mushroom baked on a bed of
    > cheese and tomato sauce. Yummy!


    There's a difference between a pig removing the topping at an
    all-you-can eat buffet and someone eating at a sushi bar. At the latter,
    the customer could choose to eat only the topping tho' why they should
    since it would be rather foolish and wasteful because they could order
    sashimi.

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    "Not": obvious change in "Reply To"

  17. #17
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice

    On 2011-02-25, Doug Freyburger <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I've been to several sushi buffet places including Todai which is a
    > small chain that competes with Oh. There's even a Todai here in the
    > Chicago burbs that I have been to.


    That's the one I was trying to remember. They had one in Pleasanton,
    on the Western edge of the SFBA. Apparently, it died a little over a
    year ago. No great loss. It sucked!

    There was a new one called Crazy Buffet, that opened just before I
    moved, but never tried it.

    nb

  18. #18
    I_am_Tosk Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice

    In article <ik9cuf$5p0$[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > On 2/25/2011 5:59 PM, dsi1 wrote:
    > > On 2/25/2011 5:24 AM, James Silverton wrote:
    > >> I have to admit that the two Japanese buffets around here that I like
    > >> each have notices saying approximately "We do not serve sashimi in the
    > >> buffet. Anyone not eating the rice will incur an extra charge." This
    > >> seems entirely reasonable to me. It is unfortunate that someone may have
    > >> to avoid a sushi buffet because of this policy but that is hardly a
    > >> great imposition or a discrimination. I don't think I want to know the
    > >> litigious Mr. Martin.
    > >>

    > >
    > > I've never seen a sign like that at the restaurants where I'll eat sushi
    > > - thank God! That's rather insulting.
    > >
    > > OTOH, I like mushrooms but my doc has told me to stay away from
    > > foods that will give me a fat ass so when I get the craving for
    > > mushrooms, I'll always head down to the nearest all you can eat pizza
    > > buffet and dig in, or rather dig in and pick out then throw the pizza
    > > away. There's nothing quite as tasty as mushroom baked on a bed of
    > > cheese and tomato sauce. Yummy!

    >
    > There's a difference between a pig removing the topping at an
    > all-you-can eat buffet and someone eating at a sushi bar. At the latter,
    > the customer could choose to eat only the topping tho' why they should
    > since it would be rather foolish and wasteful because they could order
    > sashimi.


    Part of the problem I would imagine is save a few heavy population
    centers on the opposite coasts, most folks in the US probably don't know
    the difference. I have heard the word Sushi all my life, but only
    recently heard the distinction of sashimi..

  19. #19
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice

    George wrote:

    <snip brooklyn's vicious crap>

    > I have been to Japan on numerous occasions and the meaning you noted
    > is correct. Also I have never been in a place offering an all you can
    > eat sushi meal that didn't explicitly note that you must eat
    > everything you order.


    Well, I've never patronized a restaurant offering an "all you can eat" deal
    of any kind so I have no idea what the norm is, but I completely agree that
    if it explicitly said somewhere that you had to eat everything you ordered,
    that the patron's already shaky case hasn't a leg to stand on. Although the
    restauranteur could have handled it better, he does not deserve to be sued,
    even if his menu wasn't explicit.



  20. #20
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Sushi includes Rice

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    > "Janet" wrote:
    > >
    > >Seems to me that both parties are acting like jerks: a restaurant owner who
    > >won't accomodate a single customer, and a customer who is litigation-happy.

    >
    > What nonsense. You were obviously raised with no ethics/morals.
    >
    > A restaurant owner is not required to accomodate that kind
    > piggish/*THIEVING* behavior... anyone who can't eat rice needs to
    > order food other than a dish that is essentially rice (shoulda
    > patronized an all you can eat vienna sausage buffet). The patron is
    > obviously a thief and a douchebag. What this thieving douchebag did
    > was tantamount to patronizing an all you can eat lobster bisque, and
    > bowl after bowl picking out whatever tidbits of lobster and telling
    > the proprietor he can either flush the rest or shove it. This
    > thieving douchebag patron needs to be punished the same as any common
    > thief... a big fat fine and a long stretch in the slammer. But it's
    > CA, ALL uneducated slimeballs.


    I concur...

    If I want to eat at a buffet, I will eat what is there and not go back
    for seconds until my plate is clean. That is only fair to the
    proprietors.

    But I don't eat like a pig either. Yeesh!
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinlien

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