Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 32

Thread: Supermarket egg quality

  1. #1
    Mick. Guest

    Default Supermarket egg quality

    Hello all,

    I admit I am easily put off by a bad egg, and last had one
    many years ago, until this week.

    I normally buy eggs in a British supermarket.

    The latest batch I have, have a best before date of 6th May.

    It has a code of : UK1688L on the box.

    On Sunday 2nd May I was making a cooked breakfast and decided to have
    scrambled eggs

    On breaking the first egg into a pan, I found the egg yolk had a strange
    bloom over the top of it and was a mixture of white and red/black.

    There was a second form in the egg besides the yolk; it was a quarter of the
    size of a yolk and a very dark red/black colour.



    I realise now I should have saved the egg to show someone but I felt so bad
    at looking at it I put it down the toilet.



    I normally have boiled eggs; I would not have seen how the egg was?

    I thought eggs went through a stage of being checked for quality.

    How can my faith in eating eggs be restored again?



    What are the best to buy?

    I do wonder if "free range" can be best as how do we know how soon after
    laying they are collected.



    Any views please.

    Mick.





  2. #2
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality


    >
    > I do wonder if "free range" can be best as how do we know how soon after
    > laying they are collected.
    >
    > Any views please.
    >
    > Mick.


    Free Range has nothing at all to do with the timing of delivery. Find
    a brand/store that doesn't fail you, and get your eggs there. Or get
    them from a local village market or farmers' market.

    N.

  3. #3
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality

    On May 4, 2:19*am, "Mick." <mrcycl...@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
    > Hello all,
    >
    > * * * * * * * *I admit I am easily put off by a bad egg, and last had one
    > many years ago, until this week.
    >
    > I normally buy eggs in a British supermarket.
    >
    > The latest batch I have, have a best before date of 6th May.
    >
    > It has a code of : UK1688L on the box.
    >
    > On Sunday 2nd May I was making a cooked breakfast and decided to have
    > scrambled eggs
    >
    > On breaking the first egg into a pan, I found the egg yolk had a strange
    > bloom over the top of it and was a mixture of white and red/black.
    >
    > There was a second form in the egg besides the yolk; it was a quarter of the
    > size of a yolk and a very dark red/black colour.
    >
    > I realise now I should have saved the egg to show someone but I felt so bad
    > at looking at it I put it down the toilet.
    >
    > I normally have boiled eggs; I would not have seen how the egg was?
    >
    > I thought eggs went through a stage of being checked for quality.
    >
    > How can my faith in eating eggs be restored again?
    >
    > What are the best to buy?
    >
    > I do wonder if "free range" can be best as how do we know how soon after
    > laying they are collected.
    >
    > Any views please.
    >
    > Mick.


    Mick, you got a fertilized egg. It was beginning to form a chick.
    If you buy eggs from a local farm
    that has roosters....well...you may get a fertilized egg that wasn't
    picked up right away before the chick started to form.

    If you buy free range, natural eggs you really should 'candle' them
    first (hold them up to a very bright light)
    and check to see if there is anything in there before you put them in
    a recipe or break them into something
    besides an individual bowl to check them.

    These days people forget that eggs can have chicks in them and if they
    get one they freak out. Um, that's where chickens come from, all
    eggs are not non fertile.

    On a good note, fertilized eggs are even better for you than non
    fertile ones. You just need to check them
    for any passengers!!!

  4. #4
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality

    On Tue, 4 May 2010 10:19:19 +0100, "Mick." <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Hello all,
    >
    > I admit I am easily put off by a bad egg, and last had one
    >many years ago, until this week.
    >
    >I normally buy eggs in a British supermarket.
    >
    >The latest batch I have, have a best before date of 6th May.
    >
    >It has a code of : UK1688L on the box.
    >
    >On Sunday 2nd May I was making a cooked breakfast and decided to have
    >scrambled eggs
    >
    >On breaking the first egg into a pan, I found the egg yolk had a strange
    >bloom over the top of it and was a mixture of white and red/black.
    >
    >There was a second form in the egg besides the yolk; it was a quarter of the
    >size of a yolk and a very dark red/black colour.
    >
    >
    >
    >I realise now I should have saved the egg to show someone but I felt so bad
    >at looking at it I put it down the toilet.
    >
    >
    >
    >I normally have boiled eggs; I would not have seen how the egg was?
    >
    >I thought eggs went through a stage of being checked for quality.
    >
    >How can my faith in eating eggs be restored again?
    >
    >
    >
    >What are the best to buy?
    >
    >I do wonder if "free range" can be best as how do we know how soon after
    >laying they are collected.
    >
    >
    >
    >Any views please.
    >
    >Mick.


    You didn't happen to buy your eggs in an Asian market did you?
    Balut anyone?

    Ross.

  5. #5
    Mick. Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > You didn't happen to buy your eggs in an Asian market did you?
    > Balut anyone?
    >
    > Ross.


    Hi Ross,
    No I bought them in a British supermarket.
    I have been to Asia and have seen people eating "Bulut" but refused to try
    it.
    But yes that does seem that was what it was.

    I am just worried how we can rely on them being good, what if I had boiled
    it?
    I realise it would have done me little harm had I eaten it boiled but just
    the thought turns me over!
    Thanks,
    Mick.



  6. #6
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality

    On 5/4/2010 11:57 AM, Mick. wrote:
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> You didn't happen to buy your eggs in an Asian market did you?
    >> Balut anyone?
    >>
    >> Ross.

    >
    > Hi Ross,
    > No I bought them in a British supermarket.
    > I have been to Asia and have seen people eating "Bulut" but refused to try
    > it.
    > But yes that does seem that was what it was.
    >
    > I am just worried how we can rely on them being good, what if I had boiled
    > it?
    > I realise it would have done me little harm had I eaten it boiled but just
    > the thought turns me over!


    If it really worries you then candle your eggs before you cook them. If
    you don't know how to do that, google "egg candling"--there are a lot of
    good sites out there describing the process.


  7. #7
    Janet Baraclough Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality

    The message
    <[email protected]>
    from ImStillMags <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > On a good note, fertilized eggs are even better for you than non
    > fertile ones.


    Why is that?

    Janet

  8. #8
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality

    On May 4, 1:29*pm, Janet Baraclough <janet.and.j...@zetnet.co.uk>
    wrote:
    > The message
    > <272f2830-825d-43f9-9d18-ed64ea16c...@t14g2000prm.googlegroups.com>
    > from ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> contains these words:
    >
    > > On a good note, fertilized eggs are even better for you than non
    > > fertile ones. *

    >
    > * *Why is that?
    >
    > * *Janet


    Maybe it's because we all need to eat feathers and feet every day.
    LOL.

    N.

  9. #9
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality

    On May 4, 11:29*am, Janet Baraclough <janet.and.j...@zetnet.co.uk>
    wrote:
    > The message
    > <272f2830-825d-43f9-9d18-ed64ea16c...@t14g2000prm.googlegroups.com>
    > from ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> contains these words:
    >
    > > On a good note, fertilized eggs are even better for you than non
    > > fertile ones. *

    >
    > * *Why is that?
    >
    > * *Janet


    Well, nutrient wise, science tells us that fertilized eggs are pretty
    much no different than fertilized eggs.... but it is my contention
    that a free range naturally fed hen who has been able to scratch and
    peck and mess around with a rooster is a happier and healtier bird and
    her eggs will have a different 'vibe' than a hen who has been in a
    tiny cage and forced to lay eggs on an assembly line.

    The color of the yolks of a free range chicken is dark yellow-orange
    and the taste is different as well. Those eggs just
    FEEL better to me, so I figure my body likes them better.

    I guess it's a personal thing.

  10. #10
    Roy Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality

    On May 4, 1:22*pm, ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On May 4, 11:29*am, Janet Baraclough <janet.and.j...@zetnet.co.uk>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > The message
    > > <272f2830-825d-43f9-9d18-ed64ea16c...@t14g2000prm.googlegroups.com>
    > > from ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> contains these words:

    >
    > > > On a good note, fertilized eggs are even better for you than non
    > > > fertile ones. *

    >
    > > * *Why is that?

    >
    > > * *Janet

    >
    > Well, nutrient wise, science tells us that fertilized eggs are pretty
    > much no different than fertilized eggs.... *but it is my contention
    > that a free range naturally fed hen who has been able to scratch and
    > peck and mess around with a rooster is a happier and healtier bird and
    > her eggs will have a different 'vibe' than a hen who has been in a
    > tiny cage and forced to lay eggs on an assembly line.
    >
    > The color of the yolks of a free range chicken is dark yellow-orange
    > and the taste is different as well. * Those eggs just
    > FEEL better to me, so I figure my body likes them better.
    >
    > I guess it's a personal thing.


    ==
    Eggs have "vibes" now? I don't think so...I was brought up on a farm
    and never discovered this quality about eggs. Yolks from free range
    hens are dark yellow or orange because the hens eat green grass...no
    other reason. Exposing chickens to every thing going on their free
    range is not healthier than caging birds but you should ask a
    veterinarian about that. Some of the vile stuff than chickens eat on
    free range might change your mind if you were to observe their habits.
    I like eggs but I prefer those that come from healthy chickens fed
    proper rations, and raised in comfortable surroundings.
    ==

  11. #11
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality

    Roy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On May 4, 1:22*pm, ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> On May 4, 11:29*am, Janet Baraclough <janet.and.j...@zetnet.co.uk>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> > The message
    >> > <272f2830-825d-43f9-9d18-ed64ea16c...@t14g2000prm.googlegroups.com>
    >> > from ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> contains these words:

    >>
    >> > > On a good note, fertilized eggs are even better for you than non
    >> > > fertile ones. *

    >>
    >> > * *Why is that?

    >>
    >> > * *Janet

    >>
    >> Well, nutrient wise, science tells us that fertilized eggs are pretty
    >> much no different than fertilized eggs.... *but it is my contention
    >> that a free range naturally fed hen who has been able to scratch and
    >> peck and mess around with a rooster is a happier and healtier bird and
    >> her eggs will have a different 'vibe' than a hen who has been in a
    >> tiny cage and forced to lay eggs on an assembly line.
    >>
    >> The color of the yolks of a free range chicken is dark yellow-orange
    >> and the taste is different as well. * Those eggs just
    >> FEEL better to me, so I figure my body likes them better.
    >>
    >> I guess it's a personal thing.

    >
    > =Eggs have "vibes" now? I don't think so...I was brought up on a farm
    > and never discovered this quality about eggs. Yolks from free range
    > hens are dark yellow or orange because the hens eat green grass...no
    > other reason. Exposing chickens to every thing going on their free
    > range is not healthier than caging birds but you should ask a
    > veterinarian about that. Some of the vile stuff than chickens eat on
    > free range might change your mind if you were to observe their habits.
    > I like eggs but I prefer those that come from healthy chickens fed
    > proper rations, and raised in comfortable surroundings.



    Summer at the farm I'd help with before dawn chores, gathering up eggs in
    the chicken coop, milking cows, etc. The coop was maybe two stories above
    ground to keep the foxes out. Once early in my youth farmer had me walk
    into the coop as they clucked aroun. He took a handful of chicken feed
    and tossed it into the air. It came down like rain. Well, the chickens
    came alive motionally and audibly all around me. I was terrified,
    covering my eyes!!! Farmer laughed his butt off. I never wanted to kill a
    farmer more in all my life of 4 years old! Not that stood a chance! I
    shrugged off the iniation after a couple days and it never happened
    again.

    Andy


  12. #12
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality

    ImStillMags wrote:
    >
    > The color of the yolks of a free range chicken is dark yellow-orange
    > and the taste is different as well. Those eggs just
    > FEEL better to me, so I figure my body likes them better.


    That's from a different diet. Caged chickens eat whatever they are fed
    which tends to be some mixture of grains, soy, maybe some flax seeds to
    increase the price. Range chickens eat bugs and weeds and whatever else
    they can get plus the feed given to them by the farmer. Some will view
    that as more natural and more healthy, others as disgusting. I'll go
    with tasting better, slightly.

  13. #13
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality

    On May 4, 12:45*pm, Roy <wila...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > On May 4, 1:22*pm, ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On May 4, 11:29*am, Janet Baraclough <janet.and.j...@zetnet.co.uk>
    > > wrote:

    >
    > > > The message
    > > > <272f2830-825d-43f9-9d18-ed64ea16c...@t14g2000prm.googlegroups.com>
    > > > from ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> contains these words:

    >
    > > > > On a good note, fertilized eggs are even better for you than non
    > > > > fertile ones. *

    >
    > > > * *Why is that?

    >
    > > > * *Janet

    >
    > > Well, nutrient wise, science tells us that fertilized eggs are pretty
    > > much no different than fertilized eggs.... *but it is my contention
    > > that a free range naturally fed hen who has been able to scratch and
    > > peck and mess around with a rooster is a happier and healtier bird and
    > > her eggs will have a different 'vibe' than a hen who has been in a
    > > tiny cage and forced to lay eggs on an assembly line.

    >
    > > The color of the yolks of a free range chicken is dark yellow-orange
    > > and the taste is different as well. * Those eggs just
    > > FEEL better to me, so I figure my body likes them better.

    >
    > > I guess it's a personal thing.

    >
    > ==
    > Eggs have "vibes" now? I don't think so...I was brought up on a farm
    > and never discovered this quality about eggs. Yolks from free range
    > hens are dark yellow or orange because the hens eat green grass...no
    > other reason. Exposing chickens to every thing going on their free
    > range is not healthier than caging birds but you should ask a
    > veterinarian about that. Some of the vile stuff than chickens eat on
    > free range might change your mind if you were to observe their habits.
    > I like eggs but I prefer those that come from healthy chickens fed
    > proper rations, and raised in comfortable surroundings.
    > ==- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I guess I'm more of a 'nature girl' than you are. I have raised many
    many chickens. The ones who got to peck and scratch and even 'clean'
    the garden and flirt with the rooster were the egg layers. The
    difference in the quality of the eggs
    from those who had the room to roam and storebought eggs from those
    who did not is marked.

    The chickens we raised for meat were kept in a small pen and fed more
    'chicken feed'.

    And yes, eggs have 'vibes', all things do.
    I really do believe it makes a difference.


  14. #14
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality

    Doug Freyburger wrote:
    >
    > That's from a different diet. Caged chickens eat whatever they are fed
    > which tends to be some mixture of grains, soy, maybe some flax seeds to


    And protein meal made from sources which cannot be fed
    to ruminant animals, such as downer cattle.

  15. #15
    Janet Baraclough Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality

    The message <[email protected]>
    from ImStillMags <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > On May 4, 11:29*am, Janet Baraclough <janet.and.j...@zetnet.co.uk>
    > wrote:
    > > The message
    > > <272f2830-825d-43f9-9d18-ed64ea16c...@t14g2000prm.googlegroups.com>
    > > from ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> contains these words:
    > >
    > > > On a good note, fertilized eggs are even better for you than non
    > > > fertile ones. *

    > >
    > > * *Why is that?
    > >
    > > * *Janet


    > Well, nutrient wise, science tells us that fertilized eggs are pretty
    > much no different than fertilized eggs....


    it's got two extra cells, is all. The cells don;t start to divide and
    multiply until the hen has finished laying a clutch
    (maybe a fortnight) and starts brooding.


    but it is my contention
    > that a free range naturally fed hen who has been able to scratch and
    > peck and mess around with a rooster is a happier and healtier bird


    LOL, have you never seen hen sex? The females NEVER court , invite or
    welcome
    it and if you've seen the technique you'll know why.

    and
    > her eggs will have a different 'vibe' than a hen who has been in a
    > tiny cage and forced to lay eggs on an assembly line.


    > The color of the yolks of a free range chicken is dark yellow-orange
    > and the taste is different as well. Those eggs just
    > FEEL better to me, so I figure my body likes them better.


    Of course; but that's about the lifestyle. Free range virgin hens
    kept without a cock, will produce the same
    taste colour number and quality of egg. IME

    Janet

    Janet

  16. #16
    atec7 7 Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality

    Mick. wrote:
    > Hello all,
    >
    > I admit I am easily put off by a bad egg, and last had one
    > many years ago, until this week.
    >
    > I normally buy eggs in a British supermarket.
    >
    > The latest batch I have, have a best before date of 6th May.
    >
    > It has a code of : UK1688L on the box.
    >
    > On Sunday 2nd May I was making a cooked breakfast and decided to have
    > scrambled eggs
    >
    > On breaking the first egg into a pan, I found the egg yolk had a strange
    > bloom over the top of it and was a mixture of white and red/black.
    >
    > There was a second form in the egg besides the yolk; it was a quarter of the
    > size of a yolk and a very dark red/black colour.
    >
    >
    >
    > I realise now I should have saved the egg to show someone but I felt so bad
    > at looking at it I put it down the toilet.
    >
    >
    >
    > I normally have boiled eggs; I would not have seen how the egg was?
    >
    > I thought eggs went through a stage of being checked for quality.
    >
    > How can my faith in eating eggs be restored again?
    >
    >
    >
    > What are the best to buy?
    >
    > I do wonder if "free range" can be best as how do we know how soon after
    > laying they are collected.
    >
    >
    >
    > Any views please.
    >
    > Mick.
    >
    >
    >
    >

    Make a habit of breaking into a vessel and pouring into the pan , one in
    a million for a bad one but it happens

  17. #17
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality

    atec7 7 <""atec77\"@ hotmail.com"> wrote:

    > Mick. wrote:
    >> Hello all,
    >>
    >> I admit I am easily put off by a bad egg, and last had
    >> one
    >> many years ago, until this week.
    >>
    >> I normally buy eggs in a British supermarket.
    >>
    >> The latest batch I have, have a best before date of 6th May.
    >>
    >> It has a code of : UK1688L on the box.
    >>
    >> On Sunday 2nd May I was making a cooked breakfast and decided to have
    >> scrambled eggs
    >>
    >> On breaking the first egg into a pan, I found the egg yolk had a
    >> strange bloom over the top of it and was a mixture of white and
    >> red/black.
    >>
    >> There was a second form in the egg besides the yolk; it was a quarter
    >> of the size of a yolk and a very dark red/black colour.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> I realise now I should have saved the egg to show someone but I felt
    >> so bad at looking at it I put it down the toilet.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> I normally have boiled eggs; I would not have seen how the egg was?
    >>
    >> I thought eggs went through a stage of being checked for quality.
    >>
    >> How can my faith in eating eggs be restored again?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> What are the best to buy?
    >>
    >> I do wonder if "free range" can be best as how do we know how soon
    >> after laying they are collected.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Any views please.
    >>
    >> Mick.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > Make a habit of breaking into a vessel and pouring into the pan , one
    > in a million for a bad one but it happens



    I saw a TV program on commercial egg production. They print a code,
    invisible to the human eye, on each egg shell. It can be seen under a
    blacklight (spectrum) lamp.

    Thought it was worth a mention. Maybe not.

    Andy


  18. #18
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality

    Andy wrote:
    >atec7 7 wrote:
    >>
    >> Make a habit of breaking into a vessel and pouring into the pan , one
    >> in a million for a bad one but it happens

    >
    >I saw a TV program on commercial egg production. They print a code,
    >invisible to the human eye, on each egg shell. It can be seen under a
    >blacklight (spectrum) lamp.
    >
    >Thought it was worth a mention. Maybe not.


    Today there are lots of high tech processes in egg production

    http://www.foodproductiondaily.com/P...-at-the-double

  19. #19
    Food SnobŪ Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality

    On May 5, 5:44*am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    > atec7 7 <""atec77\"@ hotmail.com"> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Mick. wrote:
    > >> Hello all,

    >
    > >> * * * * * * * *I admit I am easily put off by a bad egg, and last had
    > >> * * * * * * * *one
    > >> many years ago, until this week.

    >
    > >> I normally buy eggs in a British supermarket.

    >
    > >> The latest batch I have, have a best before date of 6th May.

    >
    > >> It has a code of : UK1688L on the box.

    >
    > >> On Sunday 2nd May I was making a cooked breakfast and decided to have
    > >> scrambled eggs

    >
    > >> On breaking the first egg into a pan, I found the egg yolk had a
    > >> strange bloom over the top of it and was a mixture of white and
    > >> red/black.

    >
    > >> There was a second form in the egg besides the yolk; it was a quarter
    > >> of the size of a yolk and a very dark red/black colour.

    >
    > >> I realise now I should have saved the egg to show someone but I felt
    > >> so bad at looking at it I put it down the toilet.

    >
    > >> I normally have boiled eggs; I would not have seen how the egg was?

    >
    > >> I thought eggs went through a stage of being checked for quality.

    >
    > >> How can my faith in eating eggs be restored again?

    >
    > >> What are the best to buy?

    >
    > >> I do wonder if "free range" can be best as how do we know how soon
    > >> after laying they are collected.

    >
    > >> Any views please.

    >
    > >> Mick.

    >
    > > Make a habit of breaking into a vessel and pouring into the pan , one
    > > in a million for a bad one but it happens

    >
    > I saw a TV program on commercial egg production. They print a code,
    > invisible to the human eye, on each egg shell. It can be seen under a
    > blacklight (spectrum) lamp.
    >
    > Thought it was worth a mention. Maybe not.


    Everything you know about eggs you learned while sitting on your ass
    in front of a TV. Heck, your "eggs" come out of a milk carton, and
    are enjoyed with a Bud Light.
    >
    > Andy


    --Bryan

  20. #20
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Supermarket egg quality

    On Wed, 05 May 2010 05:44:13 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I saw a TV program on commercial egg production. They print a code,
    >invisible to the human eye, on each egg shell. It can be seen under a
    >blacklight (spectrum) lamp.


    I wonder if that's true for all commercial eggs? I need to find my
    black light and find out!
    >
    >Thought it was worth a mention. Maybe not.
    >

    FWIW I thought it was interesting.


    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32