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Thread: Suggested by RFC

  1. #1
    George Leppla Guest

    Default Suggested by RFC

    So the holidays are coming and I have a few things I want to make based
    on posts I have read here.

    1) Chicken Liver Pate. Haven't had that in a long time, livers are
    cheap. Thinking about serving this on New Year's Eve as part of a cold
    snack platter.

    2) Head cheese/Souse. Another thing I haven't had in a long time and
    since other family members like it, I'm going to try to make some next
    week before Christmas. I'll use pigs feet and some Boston Butt instead
    of the actual head.

    3) Sausage. If Santa was paying attention, we should get a meat grinder
    for Christmas and I'd like to try making some sausage, probably starting
    with Om's recipe for Italian sausage.

    How about you? Did you get any ideas for the holidays from RFC?

    George L

  2. #2
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Suggested by RFC

    George wrote:

    > So the holidays are coming and I have a few things I want to make based on
    > posts I have read here.
    >
    > 1) Chicken Liver Pate. Haven't had that in a long time, livers are
    > cheap. Thinking about serving this on New Year's Eve as part of a cold
    > snack platter.
    >
    > 2) Head cheese/Souse. Another thing I haven't had in a long time and
    > since other family members like it, I'm going to try to make some next
    > week before Christmas. I'll use pigs feet and some Boston Butt instead of
    > the actual head.
    >
    > 3) Sausage. If Santa was paying attention, we should get a meat grinder
    > for Christmas and I'd like to try making some sausage, probably starting
    > with Om's recipe for Italian sausage.
    >
    > How about you? Did you get any ideas for the holidays from RFC?


    I get ideas from RFC all the time, but I try to be completely independent
    when it comes to planning for the holidays. I use RFC ideas *around* the
    holidays, though. For example, Janet recently wrote what I thought was a
    very interesting post about making chocolate truffles. I'm not having
    truffles at any of the upcoming holidays, but I might make truffles on an
    "off-day" just because I'm interested in trying out what she wrote.

    Even your post above gave me an idea: Christine told me about something
    called "faux gras" which is made using chicken livers and butter. I think
    that New Year's Eve would be a great time to try making it. (I haven't
    started planning my New Year's Eve menu yet.)

    Bob


  3. #3
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Suggested by RFC

    On Tue, 15 Dec 2009 06:41:00 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >Even your post above gave me an idea: Christine told me about something
    >called "faux gras" which is made using chicken livers and butter. I think
    >that New Year's Eve would be a great time to try making it. (I haven't
    >started planning my New Year's Eve menu yet.)


    And a lot of cream. It is from Michel Richard's book, Happy in the
    Kitchen. He is one of the very few chefs that has done both pastry,
    and then switched over the hot side of the kitchen. And has excelled
    at both. His pastries/desserts were touted highly when he was just
    doing mostly that, and now his creativity on the hot side is also
    pretty well regarded.

    I have this book. It is one I think you might really like.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  4. #4
    Nan Guest

    Default Re: Suggested by RFC

    On Dec 15, 9:48*am, Christine Dabney <artis...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
    > On Tue, 15 Dec 2009 06:41:00 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
    >
    > <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:
    > >Even your post above gave me an idea: Christine told me about something
    > >called "faux gras" which is made using chicken livers and butter. I think
    > >that New Year's Eve would be a great time to try making it. (I haven't
    > >started planning my New Year's Eve menu yet.)

    >
    > And a lot of cream. *It is from Michel Richard's book, Happy in the
    > Kitchen. *He is one of the very few chefs that has done both pastry,
    > and then switched over the hot side of the kitchen. *And has excelled
    > at both. *His pastries/desserts were touted highly when he was just
    > doing mostly that, and now his creativity on the hot side is also
    > pretty well regarded.
    >
    > I have this book. It is one I think you might really like.
    >
    > Christine
    > --http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com


    Could you share the recipe, Please???
    Nan

  5. #5
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Suggested by RFC

    Nan wrote:

    > Could you share the recipe, Please???


    I found it online (with modifications noted) at
    http://steamykitchen.com/112-****ake...faux-gras.html. If I make it for
    New Year's Eve I think I'll adapt it further as the author notes, using a
    cranberry gelee rather than the cucumber-parsley gelee.

    Bob




  6. #6
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Suggested by RFC

    On Tue, 15 Dec 2009 08:20:43 -0600, George Leppla wrote:

    > How about you? Did you get any ideas for the holidays from RFC?


    Baklava. It reinforced my long standing policy that, "I Don't
    Bake". Cook, yes. But baking is for the birds.

    -sw

  7. #7
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Suggested by RFC


    "George Leppla" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > So the holidays are coming and I have a few things I want to make based on
    > posts I have read here.
    >
    > 1) Chicken Liver Pate. Haven't had that in a long time, livers are
    > cheap. Thinking about serving this on New Year's Eve as part of a cold
    > snack platter.
    >
    > 2) Head cheese/Souse. Another thing I haven't had in a long time and
    > since other family members like it, I'm going to try to make some next
    > week before Christmas. I'll use pigs feet and some Boston Butt instead of
    > the actual head.
    >
    > 3) Sausage. If Santa was paying attention, we should get a meat grinder
    > for Christmas and I'd like to try making some sausage, probably starting
    > with Om's recipe for Italian sausage.
    >
    > How about you? Did you get any ideas for the holidays from RFC?
    >


    I have gotten some wonderful ideas! Last year I made a tourtiere because
    someone posted a recipe here, I started googling other recipes and made one
    for Christmas. Never heard of it before that. I don't cook much by recipe
    but by concept and I love reading how others combine ingredients well, and I
    just try things. It's fun!


  8. #8
    Julana Benaroon Guest

    Default Re: Suggested by RFC

    George wrote:

    > How about you? Did you get any ideas for the holidays from RFC?


    RFC is a source of ideas for me, but only one of many. Most of the people in
    this group live in the Northern Hemisphere, so the appropriate food for your
    December holidays is heavy winter food. That's not the case here at all. My
    chief inspiration comes from what I find in the marketplace, and in December
    I want to cook light but satisfying food. I might peruse six-month-old posts
    to see what gets cooked here in early summer, but I do try to be a bit more
    elegant than what most of you make at that time of year. (Sorry to be so
    blunt, but I have read time and again about your hot dog cookouts in July,
    and that wouldn't be good enough for our Christmas dinner!)

    --
    "Close The Gap!"


  9. #9
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Suggested by RFC

    I wrote:

    >> How about you? Did you get any ideas for the holidays from RFC?

    >
    > I get ideas from RFC all the time, but I try to be completely independent
    > when it comes to planning for the holidays. I use RFC ideas *around* the
    > holidays, though. For example, Janet recently wrote what I thought was a
    > very interesting post about making chocolate truffles. I'm not having
    > truffles at any of the upcoming holidays, but I might make truffles on an
    > "off-day" just because I'm interested in trying out what she wrote.
    >
    > Even your post above gave me an idea: Christine told me about something
    > called "faux gras" which is made using chicken livers and butter. I think
    > that New Year's Eve would be a great time to try making it. (I haven't
    > started planning my New Year's Eve menu yet.)


    ....and now I'm adding Dungeness crab to that menu -- ANOTHER idea I got from
    RFC!

    So for New Year's Eve I'm having:

    Faux Gras: I'm thinking of putting it into a crème brûlée dish and searing
    with a blowtorch, then serving it with cranberry chutney.

    Dungeness Crab: My plan is to have it simply steamed, chilled, and served
    cold with a hot beurre blanc spiked with powdered California chiles.

    Steak Tartare: I use a hybrid recipe, but the most important factors are
    that the meat is from a bottom round roast (which is lean and beefy), and
    it's chopped rather than being ground. I am bemused by the people who spend
    money on Wagyu beef and make tartare out of it. Cold beef fat is not
    appealing to me.

    I'm hoping to talk Lin into making artisanal bread for the occasion. I need
    to add some vegetable dishes[1] and maybe a dessert or two, but so far
    nothing has quite "clicked". We'll be drinking Prosecco.

    Bob
    [1] I'm thinking cooking one or two of these candidates, but would welcome
    suggestions:
    Vegetable terrine of some kind
    Leeks à la Grecque, i.e., stewed in olive oil with lemon
    Spinach soufflé
    Caramelized fennel on top of celery-root purée
    Eggplant caviar
    Onion soup gratinée
    Savory cream puffs filled with spiced butternut squash and pecans


  10. #10
    Julana Benaroon Guest

    Default Re: Suggested by RFC

    Bob Terwilliger wrote:

    > So for New Year's Eve I'm having:
    >
    > Faux Gras: I'm thinking of putting it into a crème brûlée dish and searing
    > with a blowtorch, then serving it with cranberry chutney.
    >
    > Dungeness Crab: My plan is to have it simply steamed, chilled, and served
    > cold with a hot beurre blanc spiked with powdered California chiles.
    >
    > Steak Tartare: I use a hybrid recipe, but the most important factors are
    > that the meat is from a bottom round roast (which is lean and beefy), and
    > it's chopped rather than being ground. I am bemused by the people who
    > spend money on Wagyu beef and make tartare out of it. Cold beef fat is not
    > appealing to me.


    If you don't mind, I will upgrade your menu for my own New Year's Eve
    gathering:

    - Seared Foie Gras with Raspberry Sauce
    - Grilled Tasmanian Lobster with Chilli Beurre Blanc
    - Wagyu Eye Fillet Tartare with Quail Eggs

    I will also serve:

    - Asparagus with Bacon and Hollandaise Sauce
    - Honeydew with Prosciutto, Coriander, and Ginger
    - Cucumber-Shingled Boursin Timbale
    - Avocado-Macadamia Ice Cream
    - Sticky Rice with Mango and Coconut
    - Chocolate-Covered Red-Bean Bon-Bons
    - Camembert with Fresh Fruit

    My husband always serves Dom Perignon on New Year's Eve.

    --
    End discrimination today - CLOSE THE GAP!


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