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Thread: Sugar Cured Country Ham

  1. #1
    cybercat Guest

    Default Sugar Cured Country Ham

    I figured it out. It's a ruse to attract people who hate the salty crap
    (even properly prepared and "sliced paper thin to release the full country
    flavor") and make them buy it anyway.

    I'm betting that enough of them miss the fact that is is cured with 8 cups
    of salt and 2 cups of sugar that it works, too.

    Refrigeration. It's a good thing.

    Why return to the hams of your technologically impoverished forbears?

    Do you think they LIKED all that salt?

    IT WAS THE ONLY WAY THEY HAD TO PRESERVE MEAT.



  2. #2
    Damsel in dis Dress Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham

    On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:07:07 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I figured it out. It's a ruse to attract people who hate the salty crap
    >(even properly prepared and "sliced paper thin to release the full country
    >flavor") and make them buy it anyway.
    >
    >I'm betting that enough of them miss the fact that is is cured with 8 cups
    >of salt and 2 cups of sugar that it works, too.
    >
    >Refrigeration. It's a good thing.
    >
    >Why return to the hams of your technologically impoverished forbears?
    >
    >Do you think they LIKED all that salt?
    >
    >IT WAS THE ONLY WAY THEY HAD TO PRESERVE MEAT.


    I sense a little reticence. Let it out, hon. We're here for you!

    Carol, who doesn't like salty food, but finds Smithfield ham strangely
    and strongly addictive (Maybe it's the way Boli slices it)

    --
    Change "invalid" to JamesBond's agent number to reply.

  3. #3
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham


    "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:07:07 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>I figured it out. It's a ruse to attract people who hate the salty crap
    >>(even properly prepared and "sliced paper thin to release the full country
    >>flavor") and make them buy it anyway.
    >>
    >>I'm betting that enough of them miss the fact that is is cured with 8 cups
    >>of salt and 2 cups of sugar that it works, too.
    >>
    >>Refrigeration. It's a good thing.
    >>
    >>Why return to the hams of your technologically impoverished forbears?
    >>
    >>Do you think they LIKED all that salt?
    >>
    >>IT WAS THE ONLY WAY THEY HAD TO PRESERVE MEAT.

    >
    > I sense a little reticence. Let it out, hon. We're here for you!
    >
    > Carol, who doesn't like salty food, but finds Smithfield ham strangely
    > and strongly addictive (Maybe it's the way Boli slices it)
    >


    I gotta be me. But I would defend your right to love country ham, Smithfield
    or otherwise, to the death. Just don't believe there is such a thing as
    "sugar cured" country ham, e.g., country ham that is not cured primarily
    with SALT.



  4. #4
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham

    On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:52:02 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >> On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:07:07 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I figured it out. It's a ruse to attract people who hate the salty crap
    >>>(even properly prepared and "sliced paper thin to release the full country
    >>>flavor") and make them buy it anyway.
    >>>
    >>>I'm betting that enough of them miss the fact that is is cured with 8 cups
    >>>of salt and 2 cups of sugar that it works, too.
    >>>
    >>>Refrigeration. It's a good thing.
    >>>
    >>>Why return to the hams of your technologically impoverished forbears?
    >>>
    >>>Do you think they LIKED all that salt?
    >>>
    >>>IT WAS THE ONLY WAY THEY HAD TO PRESERVE MEAT.

    >>
    >> I sense a little reticence. Let it out, hon. We're here for you!
    >>
    >> Carol, who doesn't like salty food, but finds Smithfield ham strangely
    >> and strongly addictive (Maybe it's the way Boli slices it)
    >>

    >
    >I gotta be me. But I would defend your right to love country ham, Smithfield
    >or otherwise, to the death. Just don't believe there is such a thing as
    >"sugar cured" country ham, e.g., country ham that is not cured primarily
    >with SALT.
    >



    You just don't understand the terminology or it has been used
    incorrectly to give you the wrong impression. A sugar cured country
    ham does, indeed, have lots of salt in the cure mixture, but also
    includes sugar. These hams can be cured with salt and NO sugar or with
    a combo...when it's a combo, it's referred to as "sugar cured."

    All sorts of country ham cure instructions here:

    http://www.ext.vt.edu/pubs/foods/458-223/458-223.html

  5. #5
    Damsel in dis Dress Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham

    On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:52:02 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >"Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >> On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:07:07 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I figured it out. It's a ruse to attract people who hate the salty crap
    >>>(even properly prepared and "sliced paper thin to release the full country
    >>>flavor") and make them buy it anyway.
    >>>
    >>>I'm betting that enough of them miss the fact that is is cured with 8 cups
    >>>of salt and 2 cups of sugar that it works, too.
    >>>
    >>>Refrigeration. It's a good thing.
    >>>
    >>>Why return to the hams of your technologically impoverished forbears?
    >>>
    >>>Do you think they LIKED all that salt?
    >>>
    >>>IT WAS THE ONLY WAY THEY HAD TO PRESERVE MEAT.

    >>
    >> I sense a little reticence. Let it out, hon. We're here for you!
    >>
    >> Carol, who doesn't like salty food, but finds Smithfield ham strangely
    >> and strongly addictive (Maybe it's the way Boli slices it)
    >>>

    >I gotta be me. But I would defend your right to love country ham, Smithfield
    >or otherwise, to the death. Just don't believe there is such a thing as
    >"sugar cured" country ham, e.g., country ham that is not cured primarily
    >with SALT.


    Naw, I hear ya. I wouldn't pay those prices for a salt lick, myself.
    But it's been a nice treat the two times I've had it. I could never
    go through a whole one at home, though.

    Carol, working the leftovers of a cheap-o Cook's butt

    --
    Change "invalid" to JamesBond's agent number to reply.

  6. #6
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham


    "Boron Elgar" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>

    >
    >
    > You just don't understand the terminology or it has been used
    > incorrectly to give you the wrong impression. A sugar cured country
    > ham does, indeed, have lots of salt in the cure mixture, but also
    > includes sugar. These hams can be cured with salt and NO sugar or with
    > a combo...when it's a combo, it's referred to as "sugar cured."


    Sigh. I KNOW that. It's an empty, stupid term for a ****ing country ham that
    is still salty as hell. As in, salt cured. Jesus Weeping Christ.


    >
    > All sorts of country ham cure instructions here:
    >
    > http://www.ext.vt.edu/pubs/foods/458-223/458-223.html




  7. #7
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham

    On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:43:45 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Carol, working the leftovers of a cheap-o Cook's butt



    Gotta laugh. We have a lot of cooks' butts in this group!

    Boron

  8. #8
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham

    Boron Elgar wrote:
    > On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:43:45 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> Carol, working the leftovers of a cheap-o Cook's butt

    >
    >
    > Gotta laugh. We have a lot of cooks' butts in this group!


    Are they as cheap, though?

  9. #9
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham

    On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 10:58:54 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Boron Elgar" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> You just don't understand the terminology or it has been used
    >> incorrectly to give you the wrong impression. A sugar cured country
    >> ham does, indeed, have lots of salt in the cure mixture, but also
    >> includes sugar. These hams can be cured with salt and NO sugar or with
    >> a combo...when it's a combo, it's referred to as "sugar cured."

    >
    >Sigh. I KNOW that. It's an empty, stupid term for a ****ing country ham that
    >is still salty as hell. As in, salt cured. Jesus Weeping Christ.


    It's a descriptive term to let a preparer or purchaser know what is
    used in the cure. Pretty simple.

    That you do not like salty ham has nothing whatsoever to do with the
    descriptors generally *used* for country ham cures. This is the
    common terminology. Just as you would need to be familiar with such
    terminology to understand what you were making or purchasing for other
    specialized foods, it is what it is. You learn the terms or look like
    an idiot when talking about the specialized food item. Your
    preferences are irrelevant to the topic itself.

    Boron


  10. #10
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham

    On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:35:56 -0600, Pennyaline
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Boron Elgar wrote:
    >> On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:43:45 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> Carol, working the leftovers of a cheap-o Cook's butt

    >>
    >>
    >> Gotta laugh. We have a lot of cooks' butts in this group!

    >
    >Are they as cheap, though?


    Yup. No club card needed and they are always in stock.

    Boron

  11. #11
    Damsel in dis Dress Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham

    On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 11:12:13 -0400, Boron Elgar
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:43:45 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Carol, working the leftovers of a cheap-o Cook's butt

    >
    >Gotta laugh. We have a lot of cooks' butts in this group!


    ROFL!!!

    Carol

    --
    Change "invalid" to JamesBond's agent number to reply.

  12. #12
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham


    "Boron Elgar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:qfvbu4tm0p[email protected]..
    > On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 10:58:54 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Boron Elgar" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> You just don't understand the terminology or it has been used
    >>> incorrectly to give you the wrong impression. A sugar cured country
    >>> ham does, indeed, have lots of salt in the cure mixture, but also
    >>> includes sugar. These hams can be cured with salt and NO sugar or with
    >>> a combo...when it's a combo, it's referred to as "sugar cured."

    >>
    >>Sigh. I KNOW that. It's an empty, stupid term for a ****ing country ham
    >>that
    >>is still salty as hell. As in, salt cured. Jesus Weeping Christ.

    >
    > It's a descriptive term to let a preparer or purchaser know what is
    > used in the cure. Pretty simple.
    >


    Right. You completely missed the context of the original post. I was simply
    distinguishing between salt-cured ham and non-salt-cured ham, which I think
    I called sweet ham or sugar-cured. Christine was splitting hairs to afford
    herself the opportunity to correct someone.

    Now piss off.



  13. #13
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham

    Boron Elgar wrote:
    > On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:43:45 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >> Carol, working the leftovers of a cheap-o Cook's butt
    >>

    >
    >
    > Gotta laugh. We have a lot of cooks' butts in this group!
    >
    > Boron
    >



    Hey, I didn't know you could see through the monitor! <blushing>


    Becca

  14. #14
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham

    On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 12:55:19 -0500, Becca <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Boron Elgar wrote:
    >> On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:43:45 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> Carol, working the leftovers of a cheap-o Cook's butt
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> Gotta laugh. We have a lot of cooks' butts in this group!
    >>
    >> Boron
    >>

    >
    >
    >Hey, I didn't know you could see through the monitor! <blushing>
    >
    >
    >Becca


    Ya gotta wear clothes when you surf the net!

    Boron

  15. #15
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham

    "cybercat" <cyberpu...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    > Why return to the hams of your technologically impoverished forbears?


    Because sometimes traditional equals good. Consider wine.

    > Do you think they LIKED all that salt?


    Humans have a metabolic need for salt. Avoid it thoroughly
    enough, cravings for it grow. Keep avoiding it and you get
    ill. It's part of why so much modern food is over salted. So
    yes I do think they liked salt. I also think they soaked hams
    to reduce the salt level so to some degree I see your
    aversion to salt as out of the average but not extremely rare.

    > IT WAS THE ONLY WAY THEY HAD TO PRESERVE MEAT.


    A Thai restaurant near me offers pork jerky. I bought some
    and tried it. Good but too much sugar for my tastes. Dried
    so completely it could be powdered for pemmican. Almost
    all commercial brands of jerky made from other critters have
    too much sugar to me so this stuff at almost candied was
    way past what I expect from jerky.

    Drying, salting, sugaring, immersing in fat (usually comfee'
    style duck or goose rendered fat) that has to be melted off
    before eating. Luktefisk is fermented. Soaked in brandy.
    Pickled in vinegar. Among those I hadn't had luktefisk and
    I thought brandied chicken was nasty.

    The oldest preservation method there is is also a way to
    improve the flavor. It's a trick that's been in use for about
    two million years - cooking. It's not as effective as those
    other methods for longevity but it's better than just sitting
    out in the wild raw.

    Canned meat? In my desk is a can of Hormel beef marked
    "Product of Argentina". I keep it in case I need to work
    through the evening. I consider it a hard ration in the sense
    that i'm not tempted to eat it under ordinary cirumstances
    but I won't hestitate in an emergency. At times I've had a
    can of Spam in my desk as a hard ration but I discovered I
    would rather wait until the work was over and seek out a
    24/7 place on the way home rather than eat it - No hot plate
    at the office and I really only eat Spam hot off the griddle.

  16. #16
    George Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham

    cybercat wrote:
    > "Boron Elgar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 10:58:54 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Boron Elgar" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> You just don't understand the terminology or it has been used
    >>>> incorrectly to give you the wrong impression. A sugar cured country
    >>>> ham does, indeed, have lots of salt in the cure mixture, but also
    >>>> includes sugar. These hams can be cured with salt and NO sugar or with
    >>>> a combo...when it's a combo, it's referred to as "sugar cured."
    >>> Sigh. I KNOW that. It's an empty, stupid term for a ****ing country ham
    >>> that
    >>> is still salty as hell. As in, salt cured. Jesus Weeping Christ.

    >> It's a descriptive term to let a preparer or purchaser know what is
    >> used in the cure. Pretty simple.
    >>

    >
    > Right. You completely missed the context of the original post. I was simply
    > distinguishing between salt-cured ham and non-salt-cured ham, which I think
    > I called sweet ham or sugar-cured. Christine was splitting hairs to afford
    > herself the opportunity to correct someone.
    >
    > Now piss off.
    >
    >


    I don;t think there is such a thing as a non salt cured ham.
    For more info...

    http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets/Ham/index.asp



  17. #17
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham


    "Doug Freyburger" <[email protected]> wrote
    > The oldest preservation method there is is also a way to
    > improve the flavor. It's a trick that's been in use for about
    > two million years - cooking. It's not as effective as those
    > other methods for longevity but it's better than just sitting
    > out in the wild raw.


    I thought you were going to say "spices." I read a while back that spices
    were used in Middle Eastern cooking to either preserve or mask off flavors.

    >
    > Canned meat? In my desk is a can of Hormel beef marked
    > "Product of Argentina". I keep it in case I need to work
    > through the evening.


    When I backpacked across Europe I partook of a can of beanee weenee on
    occasion.



  18. #18
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham

    On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 12:00:07 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Boron Elgar" <boron_elgar@hootmail.co[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >> On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 10:58:54 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>"Boron Elgar" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> You just don't understand the terminology or it has been used
    >>>> incorrectly to give you the wrong impression. A sugar cured country
    >>>> ham does, indeed, have lots of salt in the cure mixture, but also
    >>>> includes sugar. These hams can be cured with salt and NO sugar or with
    >>>> a combo...when it's a combo, it's referred to as "sugar cured."
    >>>
    >>>Sigh. I KNOW that. It's an empty, stupid term for a ****ing country ham
    >>>that
    >>>is still salty as hell. As in, salt cured. Jesus Weeping Christ.

    >>
    >> It's a descriptive term to let a preparer or purchaser know what is
    >> used in the cure. Pretty simple.
    >>

    >
    >Right. You completely missed the context of the original post.


    Nope. You were pretty strident in your tirade.

    > I was simply
    >distinguishing between salt-cured ham and non-salt-cured ham, which I think
    >I called sweet ham or sugar-cured. Christine was splitting hairs to afford
    >herself the opportunity to correct someone.


    Yeah, and you were sticking your nose in to try to show off, but you
    ****ed up, now didn't you?
    >
    >Now piss off.


    I wouldn't dream of it until you had your foolishness pointed out to
    everyone in great detail, and even then, given the opportunity to
    tweak you yet again would prove irresistible.

    You really don't know your ass from a hole in the wall.

    Boron



  19. #19
    Damsel in dis Dress Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham

    On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 16:55:56 -0400, Boron Elgar
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 12:00:07 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>"Boron Elgar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected] ..
    >>> On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 10:58:54 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>"Boron Elgar" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> You just don't understand the terminology or it has been used
    >>>>> incorrectly to give you the wrong impression. A sugar cured country
    >>>>> ham does, indeed, have lots of salt in the cure mixture, but also
    >>>>> includes sugar. These hams can be cured with salt and NO sugar or with
    >>>>> a combo...when it's a combo, it's referred to as "sugar cured."
    >>>>
    >>>>Sigh. I KNOW that. It's an empty, stupid term for a ****ing country ham
    >>>>that
    >>>>is still salty as hell. As in, salt cured. Jesus Weeping Christ.
    >>>
    >>> It's a descriptive term to let a preparer or purchaser know what is
    >>> used in the cure. Pretty simple.

    >>
    >>Right. You completely missed the context of the original post.

    >
    >Nope. You were pretty strident in your tirade.
    >
    >> I was simply
    >>distinguishing between salt-cured ham and non-salt-cured ham, which I think
    >>I called sweet ham or sugar-cured. Christine was splitting hairs to afford
    >>herself the opportunity to correct someone.

    >
    >Yeah, and you were sticking your nose in to try to show off, but you
    >****ed up, now didn't you?
    >>
    >>Now piss off.

    >
    >I wouldn't dream of it until you had your foolishness pointed out to
    >everyone in great detail, and even then, given the opportunity to
    >tweak you yet again would prove irresistible.
    >
    >You really don't know your ass from a hole in the wall.



    Barb, you grab the lawn chairs. I'll do the kettle corn.

    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Kettle Corn

    Recipe By :Carol Peterson
    Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories : Signature Dishes Snacks-Sweet

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    vegetable oil
    popcorn
    2 tablespoons granulated sugar
    salt -- for sprinkling

    In a three-quart saucepan (or "kettle") with a tight-fitting lid, pour
    enough oil to cover to a depth of about one-half the size of a popcorn
    kernel. Add two "test" kernels of popcorn, and turn heat to medium
    high. When the test kernels pop, the oil is hot enough to continue.

    Quickly pour in enough popcorn to cover the bottom of the saucepan in
    an even layer. Sprinkle the sugar over the unpopped kernels, and
    place the lid on the pan. As the corn pops, shake the pan
    occasionally to assure that unpopped kernels reach the bottom of the
    pan. When the lid starts to lift off the pan and the popping slows or
    stops, remove pan from heat.

    Pour popped corn into a large bowl or several smaller ones. Dust
    lightly with salt.

    Yield:
    "12 cups"

    --
    Change "invalid" to JamesBond's agent number to reply.

  20. #20
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Sugar Cured Country Ham

    Damsel in dis Dress wrote:

    > * Exported from MasterCook *
    >
    > Kettle Corn
    >
    > Recipe By :Carol Peterson
    > Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
    > Categories : Signature Dishes Snacks-Sweet
    >
    > Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    > -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    > vegetable oil
    > popcorn
    > 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
    > salt -- for sprinkling
    >
    > In a three-quart saucepan (or "kettle") with a tight-fitting lid, pour
    > enough oil to cover to a depth of about one-half the size of a popcorn
    > kernel. Add two "test" kernels of popcorn, and turn heat to medium
    > high. When the test kernels pop, the oil is hot enough to continue.
    >
    > Quickly pour in enough popcorn to cover the bottom of the saucepan in
    > an even layer. Sprinkle the sugar over the unpopped kernels, and
    > place the lid on the pan. As the corn pops, shake the pan
    > occasionally to assure that unpopped kernels reach the bottom of the
    > pan. When the lid starts to lift off the pan and the popping slows or
    > stops, remove pan from heat.
    >
    > Pour popped corn into a large bowl or several smaller ones. Dust
    > lightly with salt.
    >
    > Yield:
    > "12 cups"
    >


    Thanks!

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