Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21

Thread: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

  1. #1
    Handy Gandy Guest

    Default Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk.
    I normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit.
    If so how much should I reduce it?

  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 05:09:08 +0000 (UTC), Handy Gandy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk.
    > I normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit.
    > If so how much should I reduce it?


    Use it 1:1. No problem.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  3. #3
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    On Mar 22, 10:09*pm, Handy Gandy <handigandy...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk.
    > I normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit.
    > If so how much should I reduce it?


    What's the recipe about? Is it a very old one? Generally you do not
    want to boil milk unless you want to denature the proteins. I learned
    as a kid that boiling milk would make the hot chocolate taste nasty.

  4. #4
    Handy Gandy Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    On Mon, 22 Mar 2010 23:25:15 -0700, spamtrap1888 wrote:

    > On Mar 22, 10:09*pm, Handy Gandy <handigandy...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >> I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk. I normally
    >> use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit. If so
    >> how much should I reduce it?

    >
    > What's the recipe about? Is it a very old one? Generally you do not want
    > to boil milk unless you want to denature the proteins. I learned as a
    > kid that boiling milk would make the hot chocolate taste nasty.


    pots de creme, this version the milk is the only creme/milk product.

  5. #5
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    In article <hoaebf$33a$[email protected]>,
    Handy Gandy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 22 Mar 2010 23:25:15 -0700, spamtrap1888 wrote:
    >
    > > On Mar 22, 10:09*pm, Handy Gandy <handigandy...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > >> I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk. I normally
    > >> use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit. If so
    > >> how much should I reduce it?

    > >
    > > What's the recipe about? Is it a very old one? Generally you do not want
    > > to boil milk unless you want to denature the proteins. I learned as a
    > > kid that boiling milk would make the hot chocolate taste nasty.

    >
    > pots de creme, this version the milk is the only creme/milk product.



    I wouldn't boil it to reduce the volume at all. Maybe add a tablespoon
    of butter to increase the richness -- increase the fat in your
    reduced-fat milk. JAT.

    Have a look at this thread on America's Test Kitchen's discussion board"
    http://www.americastestkitchentv.com...?postID=193500
    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    Angel Hair Pasta with Mushrooms and Artichokes,
    Marcy 22, 2010

  6. #6
    pltrgyst Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 05:09:08 +0000 (UTC), Handy Gandy <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk.
    >I normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit.
    >If so how much should I reduce it?


    Well, math is your friend. If going from 2% to whole milk -- 100% -- you should
    obviously reduce it to 1/50th the volume. That would be approximately one
    teaspoon.

    -- Larry

  7. #7
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    On Mar 23, 5:53�pm, pltrgyst <pltrg...@xhost.org> wrote:
    > On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 05:09:08 +0000 (UTC), Handy Gandy <handigandy...@yahoo.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk.
    > >I normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit..
    > >If so how much should I reduce it?

    >
    > Well, math is your friend. If going from 2% to whole milk -- 100% -- you should
    > obviously reduce it to 1/50th the volume. �That would be approximately one
    > teaspoon.
    >
    > -- Larry



    Whole milk is not 100%. The percentage refers to the amount of
    butterfat in the milk by weight. If it were 100% you would have
    butter. Whole milk is only around 3.5% butterfat by weight.

  8. #8
    Steve B Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.


    <handigandy...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >> >> I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk. I normally
    >> >> use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit. If so
    >> >> how much should I reduce it?


    I'd use 2%, but I would not boil it.

    Steve



  9. #9
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    pltrgyst wrote:
    > On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 05:09:08 +0000 (UTC), Handy Gandy <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk.
    >> I normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit.
    >> If so how much should I reduce it?

    >
    > Well, math is your friend. If going from 2% to whole milk -- 100% -- you should
    > obviously reduce it to 1/50th the volume. That would be approximately one
    > teaspoon.


    Hee! I love it.

    ObActualFood: Mortadella, red onions, and tomatoes on potato bread. Yumma.

    Serene
    --
    "I tend to come down on the side of autonomy. Once people are grown up,
    I believe they have the right to go to hell in the handbasket of their
    choosing." -- Pat Kight, on alt.polyamory

  10. #10
    Handy Gandy Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 15:24:39 -0700, Steve B wrote:

    > <handigandy...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >>> >> I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk. I
    >>> >> normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a
    >>> >> bit. If so how much should I reduce it?

    >
    > I'd use 2%, but I would not boil it.
    >
    > Steve


    If you do not boil it how can you be sure the egg is safely cooked?

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    On Wed, 24 Mar 2010 04:47:19 +0000 (UTC), Handy Gandy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 15:24:39 -0700, Steve B wrote:
    >
    > > <handigandy...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > >>> >> I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk. I
    > >>> >> normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a
    > >>> >> bit. If so how much should I reduce it?

    > >
    > > I'd use 2%, but I would not boil it.
    > >
    > > Steve

    >
    > If you do not boil it how can you be sure the egg is safely cooked?


    Eggs only need to reach a minimum 160 F and they don't need to stay
    at that temperature for any sustained amount of time.

    http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets...wers/index.asp


    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  12. #12
    pltrgyst Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 14:58:43 -0700 (PDT), "[email protected]" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Whole milk is not 100%. The percentage refers to the amount of
    >butterfat in the milk by weight. If it were 100% you would have
    >butter. Whole milk is only around 3.5% butterfat by weight.


    Whooosh!

    Oh, AOL. Never mind.

    -- Larry

  13. #13
    Food Snob Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    On Mar 24, 2:07*am, pltrgyst <pltrg...@xhost.org> wrote:
    > On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 14:58:43 -0700 (PDT), "djs0...@aol.com" <djs0...@aol.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Whole milk is not 100%. *The percentage refers to the amount of
    > >butterfat in the milk by weight. *If it were 100% you would have
    > >butter. *Whole milk is only around 3.5% butterfat by weight.

    >
    > Whooosh!
    >
    > Oh, AOL. Never mind.


    That's what djs... gets for trying to correct an idiot.
    >
    > -- Larry


    --Bryan

  14. #14
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    On Mar 23, 12:09*am, Handy Gandy <handigandy...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk.
    > I normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit.
    > If so how much should I reduce it?


    I never have whole milk in the house; I buy whipping cream in small
    amounts if I need it for a recipe that calls for whipped cream.

    I use skim milk across the board, and it makes no difference at all in
    how the recipe comes out.

    N.

  15. #15
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    On Mar 23, 1:25*am, spamtrap1888 <spamtrap1...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Mar 22, 10:09*pm, Handy Gandy <handigandy...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    > > I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk.
    > > I normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit.
    > > If so how much should I reduce it?

    >
    > What's the recipe about? Is it a very old one? Generally you do not
    > want to boil milk unless you want to denature the proteins. I learned
    > as a kid that boiling milk would make the hot chocolate taste nasty.


    The nasty taste is only if the milk is burned. There's no reason to
    boil milk, anyway - simmering or scalding is good for recipes.

    Oh, wait - when the kids were babies, boiled skim milk was to cure
    diarrhea....but that's the only use I've ever heard of it.

    N.

  16. #16
    PLucas Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    Nancy2 <[email protected]> wrote in news:777efb40-c415-4344-b5a9-
    [email protected]:

    > On Mar 23, 12:09*am, Handy Gandy <handigandy...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >> I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk.
    >> I normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit.
    >> If so how much should I reduce it?

    >
    > I never have whole milk in the house; I buy whipping cream in small
    > amounts if I need it for a recipe that calls for whipped cream.
    >
    > I use skim milk across the board, and it makes no difference at all in
    > how the recipe comes out.
    >



    Skim Milk = water with white colouring added.

    No offence, Nancy2, but if skim milk is all you use, just give it all away
    and use water. You'll save money.

    I regard skim 'milk' as an offence to real milk. They've taken a really good
    product, and turned it into crap.

    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia

    All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.

    Edmund Burke.

  17. #17
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    On Mar 24, 3:07�am, pltrgyst <pltrg...@xhost.org> wrote:
    > On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 14:58:43 -0700 (PDT), "djs0...@aol.com" <djs0...@aol.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Whole milk is not 100%. �The percentage refers to the amount of
    > >butterfat in the milk by weight. �If it were 100% you would have
    > >butter. �Whole milk is only around 3.5% butterfat by weight.

    >
    > Whooosh!
    >
    > Oh, AOL. Never mind.
    >
    > -- Larry


    Listen here jackass. Not everyone is going to realize that you're
    joking. Believe it or not someone might actually think you're serious
    unless you indicate that you're just being facetious. A person who
    has zero experience with cooking might actually think you're being
    serious.

  18. #18
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    On Mar 24, 10:47*am, PLucas <PLu...@home.upstairs.in.brissie.aus>
    wrote:
    > Nancy2 <nancy-doo...@uiowa.edu> wrote in news:777efb40-c415-4344-b5a9-
    > 5cf643546...@r1g2000yqj.googlegroups.com:
    >
    > > On Mar 23, 12:09*am, Handy Gandy <handigandy...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > >> I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk.
    > >> I normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit.
    > >> If so how much should I reduce it?

    >
    > > I never have whole milk in the house; I buy whipping cream in small
    > > amounts if I need it for a recipe that calls for whipped cream.

    >
    > > I use skim milk across the board, and it makes no difference at all in
    > > how the recipe comes out.

    >
    > Skim Milk = water with white colouring added.
    >
    > No offence, Nancy2, but if skim milk is all you use, just give it all away
    > and use water. You'll save money.
    >
    > I regard skim 'milk' as an offence to real milk. They've taken a really good
    > product, and turned it into crap.
    >
    > --
    > Peter Lucas
    > Brisbane
    > Australia
    >
    > All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing..
    >
    > Edmund Burke.


    Whichever PeterL you are - you are entitled to your opinion, which
    certainly is not mine, nor is it my experience. For example: If you
    make scalloped corn, one cannot tell the difference between skim milk
    or whole milk, and you greatly decrease the fat content without
    noticeably affecting the taste if you use skim milk.

    OTOH, I don't like the taste of cream unless it's flavored whipped
    cream. Whole milk makes me gag. I love me my skim milk. And it's
    got a lot more nutritional value than water.

    N.

  19. #19
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    In article <hoc5gm$e6a$[email protected]>,
    Handy Gandy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 15:24:39 -0700, Steve B wrote:
    >
    > > <handigandy...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > >>> >> I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk. I
    > >>> >> normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a
    > >>> >> bit. If so how much should I reduce it?

    > >
    > > I'd use 2%, but I would not boil it.
    > >
    > > Steve

    >
    > If you do not boil it how can you be sure the egg is safely cooked?


    Salmonella (assuming that's your concern) is killed at below-boiling
    temperatures -- I think it's about 142-146 degrees.


    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    Angel Food Dessert, March 23, 2010

  20. #20
    PLucas Guest

    Default Re: Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

    Nancy2 <[email protected]> wrote in news:e3183fc7-d89d-45d7-a648-
    [email protected]:

    > On Mar 24, 10:47*am, PLucas <PLu...@home.upstairs.in.brissie.aus>
    > wrote:


    >
    > Whichever PeterL you are



    I be the real one.

    I'm @home.upstairs.in.brissie.aus

    and a bit ticked off...... a rain squall just came through, and I had some
    almost dry washing on the line..... and now the sun is shining again...... oh
    well, that was the final rinse cycle :-)


    > - you are entitled to your opinion,



    Thankyou :-)


    > which
    > certainly is not mine, nor is it my experience. For example: If you
    > make scalloped corn, one cannot tell the difference between skim milk
    > or whole milk, and you greatly decrease the fat content without
    > noticeably affecting the taste if you use skim milk.



    I had to Google 'scalloped corn' as till now I'd only ever heard of scalloped
    potatos.

    http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Scallop...sLikeThis.aspx

    Had a look at a few of them in there, but none use milk. Obviously, your
    recipe is a tad different.

    I only saw corn, sour cream, butter (lots of butter!!) and packets of corn
    muffin mix.


    >
    > OTOH, I don't like the taste of cream unless it's flavored whipped
    > cream. Whole milk makes me gag.



    Hmmmm, strange!! Is it an allergy thing.......... or a bad experience as a
    child thing?


    As for whipped cream, I did some the other night for an apple pie I made.

    Plonked some cream in a bowl, added some vanilla extract, and sifted some
    pure icing sugar on top, then used a hand whisk while I was watching a show
    on TV.

    The SO had got the electric mixer/beater out, but I prefer to do it by hand.

    Sometimes it's quicker, and you can 'feel' the cream a lot better.

    What do you call "flavoured whipped cream"?


    > I love me my skim milk. And it's
    > got a lot more nutritional value than water.
    >



    No sweat, you can have my share :-)

    I've tried it in the past, and to me it's like someone has had a glass of
    'real' milk, immediately filled it with water and handed it to me.

    I used to drink gallons of the stuff (real milk) when I was a young soldier.
    They'd bring a 25lt milk churn out of the fridge, and have a large ladle
    hanging off the lip, which I'd then use to fill my cups canteen with icy cold
    white gold ;-)

    Nowadays I swipe a swig out of the 2lt bottle in the fridge, when the SO
    isn't looking :-)


    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia

    All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.

    Edmund Burke.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32