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Thread: Stupid, stupid, stupid. . .

  1. #21
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Stupid, stupid, stupid. . .



    "Janet Bostwick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..

    >>So do I!!! She had me laughing too!!! I just hope she hasn't done any
    >>damage to that arm!
    >>
    >>--

    >
    > It is 10 weeks since the last surgery and I have been given the o.k.
    > to be able to lift things. I'm just very weak all over from not doing
    > anything since the first week in December. I may get a few more
    > degrees of mobility in my arm but probably not. When he did the last
    > surgery he said he couldn't do a complete repair because there wasn't
    > enough good tissue left to work with. Apparently I really tore up my
    > shoulder. They are also thinking that 6 years of nutritional
    > deprivation resulting from radiation treatments has something to do
    > with it even though those digestive issues have been repaired. It
    > just takes a couple of years to re-coup and older people, not so much.
    > Still, I'm alive and kicking ) Thanks for your concern.


    Oh Janet! You don't have your troubles to seek I admire you greatly for
    the way you press on with what you want to do. Many would just give up. I
    hope your muscles will strengthen as you work at it. They soon weaken with
    lack of use.

    Bless you m'dear! You are an inspiration!
    --
    --

    http://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  2. #22
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Stupid, stupid, stupid. . .

    "Janet Bostwick" wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..

    On Thu, 27 Sep 2012 14:24:12 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Thu, 27 Sep 2012 13:09:41 -0600, Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >
    >> I want to smoke a turkey this weekend. I have a 12 pounder and it is
    >> thawed, so today is the day to begin brining it.
    >> I got the brine made and cooled. I've only brined a turkey during
    >> late fall and winter and was able to put the bird in the cooler out on
    >> the deck for the duration. I can't do that now. It's too warm.
    >> I was sure that the bird would fit in one of those 2 1/2 gallon zip
    >> bags along with the brine -- just the way that you would do a roast or
    >> a steak. Well, it does fit in the bag and so does brine. But when
    >> you close the bag, half of the turkey sticks up out of the brine.

    >
    >Even if you suck all the air out of the bag? You should have enough
    >coverage that way, just rotate the bag every once in a while.
    >
    >-sw

    You'd think so, wouldn't you? That's where you and I went wrong. A
    turkey isn't flat, it has this big hump called a breast. It gets in
    the way of squeezing all the air out and it also prevents brine
    coverage when you turn the bird over. The only way I see that is
    reliable for brining a turkey is vertically or literally swimming in
    brine. I always do mine in one of those big Igloo cold water coolers.
    The bird can swim in there and I can bungee cord the lid down so that
    raccoons can't lift the lid.
    Janet US
    *****************
    What am I missing? Can't you still brine the bird in the cooler but leave
    the cooler in the house?

    Jill


  3. #23
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Stupid, stupid, stupid. . .

    On Fri, 28 Sep 2012 08:35:08 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >"Janet Bostwick" wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >
    >On Thu, 27 Sep 2012 14:24:12 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>On Thu, 27 Sep 2012 13:09:41 -0600, Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >>
    >>> I want to smoke a turkey this weekend. I have a 12 pounder and it is
    >>> thawed, so today is the day to begin brining it.
    >>> I got the brine made and cooled. I've only brined a turkey during
    >>> late fall and winter and was able to put the bird in the cooler out on
    >>> the deck for the duration. I can't do that now. It's too warm.
    >>> I was sure that the bird would fit in one of those 2 1/2 gallon zip
    >>> bags along with the brine -- just the way that you would do a roast or
    >>> a steak. Well, it does fit in the bag and so does brine. But when
    >>> you close the bag, half of the turkey sticks up out of the brine.

    >>
    >>Even if you suck all the air out of the bag? You should have enough
    >>coverage that way, just rotate the bag every once in a while.
    >>
    >>-sw

    >You'd think so, wouldn't you? That's where you and I went wrong. A
    >turkey isn't flat, it has this big hump called a breast. It gets in
    >the way of squeezing all the air out and it also prevents brine
    >coverage when you turn the bird over. The only way I see that is
    >reliable for brining a turkey is vertically or literally swimming in
    >brine. I always do mine in one of those big Igloo cold water coolers.
    >The bird can swim in there and I can bungee cord the lid down so that
    >raccoons can't lift the lid.
    >Janet US
    >*****************
    >What am I missing? Can't you still brine the bird in the cooler but leave
    >the cooler in the house?
    >
    >Jill


    Yes, I could do it in the house if I kept on adding ice bags or
    bottles to keep the temperature of the turkey and brine below 40F.
    When the temperature outdoors is consistently below 40F that isn't a
    problem -- even freezing temperatures aren't a problem as the salt in
    the brine keeps everything from freezing solid.
    Janet US

  4. #24
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Stupid, stupid, stupid. . .

    Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Fri, 28 Sep 2012 08:35:08 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> "Janet Bostwick" wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>
    >> On Thu, 27 Sep 2012 14:24:12 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Thu, 27 Sep 2012 13:09:41 -0600, Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I want to smoke a turkey this weekend. I have a 12 pounder and it
    >>>> is thawed, so today is the day to begin brining it.
    >>>> I got the brine made and cooled. I've only brined a turkey during
    >>>> late fall and winter and was able to put the bird in the cooler
    >>>> out on the deck for the duration. I can't do that now. It's too
    >>>> warm.
    >>>> I was sure that the bird would fit in one of those 2 1/2 gallon zip
    >>>> bags along with the brine -- just the way that you would do a
    >>>> roast or a steak. Well, it does fit in the bag and so does brine.
    >>>> But when you close the bag, half of the turkey sticks up out of
    >>>> the brine.
    >>>
    >>> Even if you suck all the air out of the bag? You should have enough
    >>> coverage that way, just rotate the bag every once in a while.
    >>>
    >>> -sw

    >> You'd think so, wouldn't you? That's where you and I went wrong. A
    >> turkey isn't flat, it has this big hump called a breast. It gets in
    >> the way of squeezing all the air out and it also prevents brine
    >> coverage when you turn the bird over. The only way I see that is
    >> reliable for brining a turkey is vertically or literally swimming in
    >> brine. I always do mine in one of those big Igloo cold water
    >> coolers. The bird can swim in there and I can bungee cord the lid
    >> down so that raccoons can't lift the lid.
    >> Janet US
    >> *****************
    >> What am I missing? Can't you still brine the bird in the cooler but
    >> leave the cooler in the house?
    >>
    >> Jill

    >
    > Yes, I could do it in the house if I kept on adding ice bags or
    > bottles to keep the temperature of the turkey and brine below 40F.
    > When the temperature outdoors is consistently below 40F that isn't a
    > problem -- even freezing temperatures aren't a problem as the salt in
    > the brine keeps everything from freezing solid.
    > Janet US


    Just mix your brine with half the water, and substitute ice for the other
    half. No need for bags if it's well insulated. Ice will melt and dilute the
    brine but temp should stay well under 40F for the amount of time needed,
    probably 12 hours max.

    MartyB



  5. #25
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Stupid, stupid, stupid. . .

    On Fri, 28 Sep 2012 12:25:47 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On Fri, 28 Sep 2012 08:35:08 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Janet Bostwick" wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]..
    >>>
    >>> On Thu, 27 Sep 2012 14:24:12 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Thu, 27 Sep 2012 13:09:41 -0600, Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I want to smoke a turkey this weekend. I have a 12 pounder and it
    >>>>> is thawed, so today is the day to begin brining it.
    >>>>> I got the brine made and cooled. I've only brined a turkey during
    >>>>> late fall and winter and was able to put the bird in the cooler
    >>>>> out on the deck for the duration. I can't do that now. It's too
    >>>>> warm.
    >>>>> I was sure that the bird would fit in one of those 2 1/2 gallon zip
    >>>>> bags along with the brine -- just the way that you would do a
    >>>>> roast or a steak. Well, it does fit in the bag and so does brine.
    >>>>> But when you close the bag, half of the turkey sticks up out of
    >>>>> the brine.
    >>>>
    >>>> Even if you suck all the air out of the bag? You should have enough
    >>>> coverage that way, just rotate the bag every once in a while.
    >>>>
    >>>> -sw
    >>> You'd think so, wouldn't you? That's where you and I went wrong. A
    >>> turkey isn't flat, it has this big hump called a breast. It gets in
    >>> the way of squeezing all the air out and it also prevents brine
    >>> coverage when you turn the bird over. The only way I see that is
    >>> reliable for brining a turkey is vertically or literally swimming in
    >>> brine. I always do mine in one of those big Igloo cold water
    >>> coolers. The bird can swim in there and I can bungee cord the lid
    >>> down so that raccoons can't lift the lid.
    >>> Janet US
    >>> *****************
    >>> What am I missing? Can't you still brine the bird in the cooler but
    >>> leave the cooler in the house?
    >>>
    >>> Jill

    >>
    >> Yes, I could do it in the house if I kept on adding ice bags or
    >> bottles to keep the temperature of the turkey and brine below 40F.
    >> When the temperature outdoors is consistently below 40F that isn't a
    >> problem -- even freezing temperatures aren't a problem as the salt in
    >> the brine keeps everything from freezing solid.
    >> Janet US

    >
    >Just mix your brine with half the water, and substitute ice for the other
    >half. No need for bags if it's well insulated. Ice will melt and dilute the
    >brine but temp should stay well under 40F for the amount of time needed,
    >probably 12 hours max.
    >
    >MartyB
    >


    I just didn't want to risk it. We are getting 90F daytime
    temperatures again. I guess I'm just a scaredy cat.
    Janet US

  6. #26
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Stupid, stupid, stupid. . .

    On 9/28/2012 7:36 AM, Janet Bostwick wrote:
    > On Fri, 28 Sep 2012 12:25:47 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> On Fri, 28 Sep 2012 08:35:08 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> "Janet Bostwick" wrote in message
    >>>> news:[email protected]..
    >>>>
    >>>> On Thu, 27 Sep 2012 14:24:12 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> On Thu, 27 Sep 2012 13:09:41 -0600, Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I want to smoke a turkey this weekend. I have a 12 pounder and it
    >>>>>> is thawed, so today is the day to begin brining it.
    >>>>>> I got the brine made and cooled. I've only brined a turkey during
    >>>>>> late fall and winter and was able to put the bird in the cooler
    >>>>>> out on the deck for the duration. I can't do that now. It's too
    >>>>>> warm.
    >>>>>> I was sure that the bird would fit in one of those 2 1/2 gallon zip
    >>>>>> bags along with the brine -- just the way that you would do a
    >>>>>> roast or a steak. Well, it does fit in the bag and so does brine.
    >>>>>> But when you close the bag, half of the turkey sticks up out of
    >>>>>> the brine.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Even if you suck all the air out of the bag? You should have enough
    >>>>> coverage that way, just rotate the bag every once in a while.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> -sw
    >>>> You'd think so, wouldn't you? That's where you and I went wrong. A
    >>>> turkey isn't flat, it has this big hump called a breast. It gets in
    >>>> the way of squeezing all the air out and it also prevents brine
    >>>> coverage when you turn the bird over. The only way I see that is
    >>>> reliable for brining a turkey is vertically or literally swimming in
    >>>> brine. I always do mine in one of those big Igloo cold water
    >>>> coolers. The bird can swim in there and I can bungee cord the lid
    >>>> down so that raccoons can't lift the lid.
    >>>> Janet US
    >>>> *****************
    >>>> What am I missing? Can't you still brine the bird in the cooler but
    >>>> leave the cooler in the house?
    >>>>
    >>>> Jill
    >>>
    >>> Yes, I could do it in the house if I kept on adding ice bags or
    >>> bottles to keep the temperature of the turkey and brine below 40F.
    >>> When the temperature outdoors is consistently below 40F that isn't a
    >>> problem -- even freezing temperatures aren't a problem as the salt in
    >>> the brine keeps everything from freezing solid.
    >>> Janet US

    >>
    >> Just mix your brine with half the water, and substitute ice for the other
    >> half. No need for bags if it's well insulated. Ice will melt and dilute the
    >> brine but temp should stay well under 40F for the amount of time needed,
    >> probably 12 hours max.
    >>
    >> MartyB
    >>

    >
    > I just didn't want to risk it. We are getting 90F daytime
    > temperatures again. I guess I'm just a scaredy cat.
    > Janet US
    >


    I just unwrap the turkey and dump it in a 5 gal bucket of salt water and
    leave it overnight. It's a fast way to defrost a turkey. I don't think
    there's any need to refrigerate a turkey that's dunked in salt water so
    I don't.

    Having to store a 20 lb turkey in the refrigerator for days, would just
    kill me. I once tried defrosting one like that and after 3 days, it was
    still frozen - that killed me. I don't have the time or the space to do
    ever try that again.




  7. #27
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Stupid, stupid, stupid. . .

    On Fri, 28 Sep 2012 12:25:47 -0500, Nunya Bidnits wrote:

    > Just mix your brine with half the water, and substitute ice for the other
    > half. No need for bags if it's well insulated. Ice will melt and dilute the
    > brine but temp should stay well under 40F for the amount of time needed,
    > probably 12 hours max.


    Frozen 2-liter (or less) bottles of water. That way your brine
    concentration stays consistent.

    -sw

  8. #28
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Stupid, stupid, stupid. . .

    dsi1 <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On 9/28/2012 7:36 AM, Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >> On Fri, 28 Sep 2012 12:25:47 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>> On Fri, 28 Sep 2012 08:35:08 -0400, "jmcquown"
    >>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> "Janet Bostwick" wrote in message
    >>>>> news:[email protected]..
    >>>>>
    >>>>> On Thu, 27 Sep 2012 14:24:12 -0500, Sqwertz
    >>>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> On Thu, 27 Sep 2012 13:09:41 -0600, Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I want to smoke a turkey this weekend. I have a 12 pounder and
    >>>>>>> it is thawed, so today is the day to begin brining it.
    >>>>>>> I got the brine made and cooled. I've only brined a turkey
    >>>>>>> during late fall and winter and was able to put the bird in the
    >>>>>>> cooler out on the deck for the duration. I can't do that now. It's
    >>>>>>> too warm.
    >>>>>>> I was sure that the bird would fit in one of those 2 1/2 gallon
    >>>>>>> zip bags along with the brine -- just the way that you would do
    >>>>>>> a roast or a steak. Well, it does fit in the bag and so does
    >>>>>>> brine. But when you close the bag, half of the turkey sticks up
    >>>>>>> out of the brine.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Even if you suck all the air out of the bag? You should have
    >>>>>> enough coverage that way, just rotate the bag every once in a
    >>>>>> while. -sw
    >>>>> You'd think so, wouldn't you? That's where you and I went wrong.
    >>>>> A turkey isn't flat, it has this big hump called a breast. It
    >>>>> gets in the way of squeezing all the air out and it also prevents
    >>>>> brine coverage when you turn the bird over. The only way I see
    >>>>> that is reliable for brining a turkey is vertically or literally
    >>>>> swimming in brine. I always do mine in one of those big Igloo
    >>>>> cold water coolers. The bird can swim in there and I can bungee
    >>>>> cord the lid down so that raccoons can't lift the lid.
    >>>>> Janet US
    >>>>> *****************
    >>>>> What am I missing? Can't you still brine the bird in the cooler
    >>>>> but leave the cooler in the house?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Jill
    >>>>
    >>>> Yes, I could do it in the house if I kept on adding ice bags or
    >>>> bottles to keep the temperature of the turkey and brine below 40F.
    >>>> When the temperature outdoors is consistently below 40F that isn't
    >>>> a problem -- even freezing temperatures aren't a problem as the
    >>>> salt in the brine keeps everything from freezing solid.
    >>>> Janet US
    >>>
    >>> Just mix your brine with half the water, and substitute ice for the
    >>> other half. No need for bags if it's well insulated. Ice will melt
    >>> and dilute the brine but temp should stay well under 40F for the
    >>> amount of time needed, probably 12 hours max.
    >>>
    >>> MartyB
    >>>

    >>
    >> I just didn't want to risk it. We are getting 90F daytime
    >> temperatures again. I guess I'm just a scaredy cat.
    >> Janet US
    >>

    >
    > I just unwrap the turkey and dump it in a 5 gal bucket of salt water
    > and leave it overnight. It's a fast way to defrost a turkey. I don't
    > think there's any need to refrigerate a turkey that's dunked in salt
    > water so I don't.


    Warm or room temp water defrosting? Glad I'm not the one who has to eat it.

    You need to hook up with Kent who is also a fan of salmonella culture
    defrosting.

    MartyB



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