Page 1 of 10 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 181

Thread: Stretching dinner

  1. #1
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Stretching dinner

    My friends know that 7pm is dinner here, and around once a week, someone
    takes me up on my open-door dinner policy and crashes dinner. I love
    this. Sometimes it's easy to make another plate, because there's a pot
    of chili on the stove or something. Tonight it was a little more tricky,
    since I had just enough of the main dish for three people. It was
    store-bought ravioli, for which I'd made a tomato sauce. I'd also
    roasted a couple heads of garlic to put on slices of baguette, and
    roasted a small amount of green beans (enough for three generous
    servings, or four small ones).

    My guest showed up around 6:45, so I quickly got out another pot and
    boiled up some spaghetti. I tossed it with butter/salt/pepper/parmesan,
    and cut more slices of baguette. The guest helped with putting roasted
    garlic and butter on the bread slices, and dinner went off without a
    hitch, and without a mention of having planned on having less food. She
    may have thought it was weird having two pasta dishes on the plate, but
    she didn't say anything. I figured, heck, you can get half-and-half at
    some Italian places. :-)

    Do you have any stretching-dinner stories? I know some of you don't
    like it when people show up unannounced, and I totally understand that,
    but my friends have my express permission to do so, so any intimation
    that she was being rude will be dismissed as silly.

    Serene

  2. #2
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner

    On Sun, 15 Jun 2008 21:35:05 -0700, Serene Vannoy
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Do you have any stretching-dinner stories? I know some of you don't
    >like it when people show up unannounced, and I totally understand that,
    >but my friends have my express permission to do so, so any intimation
    >that she was being rude will be dismissed as silly.
    >
    >Serene


    I don't have any stretching dinner stories, but I wanted to say that
    is a lovely idea...and a wonderfully thoughtful friend that you are.

    I think I would love it...personally... Although there might be times
    I might not want company..but I think I intentionally keep a well
    stocked pantry just for times like that....

    I would probably bring something to add to supper if I came though...


    Christine, who might have such an open door policy when she gets back
    to the bay area..

  3. #3
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner

    On Sun, 15 Jun 2008 21:35:05 -0700, Serene Vannoy
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Do you have any stretching-dinner stories? I know some of you don't
    >like it when people show up unannounced, and I totally understand that,
    >but my friends have my express permission to do so, so any intimation
    >that she was being rude will be dismissed as silly.
    >
    >Serene


    I don't have any stretching dinner stories, but I wanted to say that
    is a lovely idea...and a wonderfully thoughtful friend that you are.

    I think I would love it...personally... Although there might be times
    I might not want company..but I think I intentionally keep a well
    stocked pantry just for times like that....

    I would probably bring something to add to supper if I came though...


    Christine, who might have such an open door policy when she gets back
    to the bay area..

  4. #4
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner

    Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote in news:6bm8roF3cc01vU18
    @mid.individual.net:

    > Do you have any stretching-dinner stories? I know some of you don't
    > like it when people show up unannounced, and I totally understand that,
    > but my friends have my express permission to do so, so any intimation
    > that she was being rude will be dismissed as silly.
    >


    Green Salad and additional appetizers can strech a meal nicely.

    --

    The house of the burning beet-Alan




  5. #5
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner

    Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote in news:6bm8roF3cc01vU18
    @mid.individual.net:

    > Do you have any stretching-dinner stories? I know some of you don't
    > like it when people show up unannounced, and I totally understand that,
    > but my friends have my express permission to do so, so any intimation
    > that she was being rude will be dismissed as silly.
    >


    Green Salad and additional appetizers can strech a meal nicely.

    --

    The house of the burning beet-Alan




  6. #6
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner

    hahabogus <[email protected]> news:Xns9ABF1A7C9D28Ahahabogus@
    69.28.186.120: in rec.food.cooking

    > Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote in news:6bm8roF3cc01vU18
    > @mid.individual.net:
    >
    >> Do you have any stretching-dinner stories? I know some of you don't
    >> like it when people show up unannounced, and I totally understand that,
    >> but my friends have my express permission to do so, so any intimation
    >> that she was being rude will be dismissed as silly.
    >>

    >
    > Green Salad and additional appetizers can strech a meal nicely.


    I was about to say the same thing. Or perhaps a veggie of some kind. I
    don't have guests pop in for dinner like that. Serene is wonderful to allow
    friends that privilege. We seldom eat dinner at the same time every day so
    it would be impossible for anyone to just pop in for it.

    Michael



    --
    "I eat vegetarians for breakfast"
    ~unknown but seen on a bumper sticker

    To email - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  7. #7
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner

    hahabogus <[email protected]> news:Xns9ABF1A7C9D28Ahahabogus@
    69.28.186.120: in rec.food.cooking

    > Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote in news:6bm8roF3cc01vU18
    > @mid.individual.net:
    >
    >> Do you have any stretching-dinner stories? I know some of you don't
    >> like it when people show up unannounced, and I totally understand that,
    >> but my friends have my express permission to do so, so any intimation
    >> that she was being rude will be dismissed as silly.
    >>

    >
    > Green Salad and additional appetizers can strech a meal nicely.


    I was about to say the same thing. Or perhaps a veggie of some kind. I
    don't have guests pop in for dinner like that. Serene is wonderful to allow
    friends that privilege. We seldom eat dinner at the same time every day so
    it would be impossible for anyone to just pop in for it.

    Michael



    --
    "I eat vegetarians for breakfast"
    ~unknown but seen on a bumper sticker

    To email - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  8. #8
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner

    Michael "Dog3" wrote:
    > hahabogus <[email protected]> news:Xns9ABF1A7C9D28Ahahabogus@
    > 69.28.186.120: in rec.food.cooking
    >
    >> Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote in news:6bm8roF3cc01vU18
    >> @mid.individual.net:
    >>
    >>> my friends have my express permission to do so, so any
    >>> intimation that she was being rude will be dismissed as silly.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Green Salad and additional appetizers can strech a meal nicely.

    >
    >We seldom eat dinner at the same
    > time every day so it would be impossible for anyone to just pop in
    > for it.
    >
    > Michael



    That would certainly keep dinner moochers at bay! 6PM, dinner? Maybe.
    Maybe not! I try to adhere to an eat before 8PM rule but that falls by the
    wayside frequently, especially now that I'm not just cooking for myself.
    Stretching a meal for drop-in guests might include salad (they can have
    mine!) or fresh fruit. More likely some nice cheeses & crackers, stuff like
    that.

    Jill


  9. #9
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner

    Michael "Dog3" wrote:
    > hahabogus <[email protected]> news:Xns9ABF1A7C9D28Ahahabogus@
    > 69.28.186.120: in rec.food.cooking
    >
    >> Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote in news:6bm8roF3cc01vU18
    >> @mid.individual.net:
    >>
    >>> my friends have my express permission to do so, so any
    >>> intimation that she was being rude will be dismissed as silly.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Green Salad and additional appetizers can strech a meal nicely.

    >
    >We seldom eat dinner at the same
    > time every day so it would be impossible for anyone to just pop in
    > for it.
    >
    > Michael



    That would certainly keep dinner moochers at bay! 6PM, dinner? Maybe.
    Maybe not! I try to adhere to an eat before 8PM rule but that falls by the
    wayside frequently, especially now that I'm not just cooking for myself.
    Stretching a meal for drop-in guests might include salad (they can have
    mine!) or fresh fruit. More likely some nice cheeses & crackers, stuff like
    that.

    Jill


  10. #10
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner


    "Serene Vannoy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > My friends know that 7pm is dinner here, and around once a week, someone
    > takes me up on my open-door dinner policy and crashes dinner. I love this.
    > Sometimes it's easy to make another plate, because there's a pot of chili
    > on the stove or something. Tonight it was a little more tricky, since I
    > had just enough of the main dish for three people. It was store-bought
    > ravioli, for which I'd made a tomato sauce. I'd also roasted a couple
    > heads of garlic to put on slices of baguette, and roasted a small amount
    > of green beans (enough for three generous servings, or four small ones).
    >
    > My guest showed up around 6:45, so I quickly got out another pot and
    > boiled up some spaghetti. I tossed it with butter/salt/pepper/parmesan,
    > and cut more slices of baguette. The guest helped with putting roasted
    > garlic and butter on the bread slices, and dinner went off without a
    > hitch, and without a mention of having planned on having less food. She
    > may have thought it was weird having two pasta dishes on the plate, but
    > she didn't say anything. I figured, heck, you can get half-and-half at
    > some Italian places. :-)
    >
    > Do you have any stretching-dinner stories? I know some of you don't like
    > it when people show up unannounced, and I totally understand that, but my
    > friends have my express permission to do so, so any intimation that she
    > was being rude will be dismissed as silly.
    >
    > Serene


    Yes, it is considered impolite if not RUDE to show up for dinner
    unannounced. Your friends were not raised properly nor do they have any
    respect for you.

    The next time it happens either show them this answer and/or send them to
    the store to get the food they want to eat.

    That's down right unacceptable behavior.

    Giving them permission to do so in in my opinion reinforcing bad behavior
    and impoliteness.


    --
    Old Scoundrel

    (AKA Dimitri)


  11. #11
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner


    "Serene Vannoy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:6bm8roF3cc01vU18@m[email protected]..
    > My friends know that 7pm is dinner here, and around once a week, someone
    > takes me up on my open-door dinner policy and crashes dinner. I love this.
    > Sometimes it's easy to make another plate, because there's a pot of chili
    > on the stove or something. Tonight it was a little more tricky, since I
    > had just enough of the main dish for three people. It was store-bought
    > ravioli, for which I'd made a tomato sauce. I'd also roasted a couple
    > heads of garlic to put on slices of baguette, and roasted a small amount
    > of green beans (enough for three generous servings, or four small ones).
    >
    > My guest showed up around 6:45, so I quickly got out another pot and
    > boiled up some spaghetti. I tossed it with butter/salt/pepper/parmesan,
    > and cut more slices of baguette. The guest helped with putting roasted
    > garlic and butter on the bread slices, and dinner went off without a
    > hitch, and without a mention of having planned on having less food. She
    > may have thought it was weird having two pasta dishes on the plate, but
    > she didn't say anything. I figured, heck, you can get half-and-half at
    > some Italian places. :-)
    >
    > Do you have any stretching-dinner stories? I know some of you don't like
    > it when people show up unannounced, and I totally understand that, but my
    > friends have my express permission to do so, so any intimation that she
    > was being rude will be dismissed as silly.
    >
    > Serene


    Yes, it is considered impolite if not RUDE to show up for dinner
    unannounced. Your friends were not raised properly nor do they have any
    respect for you.

    The next time it happens either show them this answer and/or send them to
    the store to get the food they want to eat.

    That's down right unacceptable behavior.

    Giving them permission to do so in in my opinion reinforcing bad behavior
    and impoliteness.


    --
    Old Scoundrel

    (AKA Dimitri)


  12. #12
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner


    "hahabogus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote in news:6bm8roF3cc01vU18
    > @mid.individual.net:
    >
    >> Do you have any stretching-dinner stories? I know some of you don't
    >> like it when people show up unannounced, and I totally understand that,
    >> but my friends have my express permission to do so, so any intimation
    >> that she was being rude will be dismissed as silly.
    >>

    >
    > Green Salad and additional appetizers can strech a meal nicely.
    >
    > --
    >
    > The house of the burning beet-Alan



    I say Fu**'em send them to the store for more food.


    --
    Old Scoundrel

    (AKA Dimitri)


  13. #13
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner


    "hahabogus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote in news:6bm8roF3cc01vU18
    > @mid.individual.net:
    >
    >> Do you have any stretching-dinner stories? I know some of you don't
    >> like it when people show up unannounced, and I totally understand that,
    >> but my friends have my express permission to do so, so any intimation
    >> that she was being rude will be dismissed as silly.
    >>

    >
    > Green Salad and additional appetizers can strech a meal nicely.
    >
    > --
    >
    > The house of the burning beet-Alan



    I say Fu**'em send them to the store for more food.


    --
    Old Scoundrel

    (AKA Dimitri)


  14. #14
    The Ranger Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner

    Dimitri <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:n_v5k.1707$[email protected]..
    [snip Unannouced Extra Guests]

    > Yes, it is considered impolite if not RUDE to show
    > up for dinner unannounced. Your friends were not
    > raised properly nor do they have any respect for you.


    I'll respectfully disagree in this particular case because
    Serene does expect it as part of both parties' (her friends'
    and -- most importantly -- her's) normal behavior.

    I don't have such a liberal open-table policy but all three
    daughter-units are not above asking if friends can stay for
    mealtimes. Chances are quite high that I'll allow it (unless
    we're headed out or on a restricted schedule.) For us, pasta,
    rice, and bread usually supplement the protein and greenery. I
    don't do a lot of sauces for the pasta because too many of the
    kids come from families that keep things plain. The first time
    I served saffron rice, the group of kids were stunned that rice
    could be turned yellow and have such a pleasant scent...
    <shrug>

    My Sainted Mother(tm) certainly had a similarly liberal meal
    policy as Serene. No one, ever, got turned away from her
    tables; if you were there when she finished cooking, you sat
    and ate with us. A quick call home was all that was needed. Of
    course, she was also very gifted at improvising and stretching
    meals. We served everything family-style so nothing was
    pre-portioned or controlled. You simply took enough so that
    everyone could get a single helping and then, if you wanted
    more of a dish, you took seconds.

    If the same "guests" are always turning up for mealtime, I can
    see where it would become old -- very quickly. (I know a couple
    collej kids and software engineers that pulled that nonsense.)
    That's where being a little more direct by sending them to the
    store with a list would assist in halting their aberrant
    behaviors. Otherwise, if it's working, it don't need fixing.

    The Ranger



  15. #15
    The Ranger Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner

    Dimitri <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:n_v5k.1707$[email protected]..
    [snip Unannouced Extra Guests]

    > Yes, it is considered impolite if not RUDE to show
    > up for dinner unannounced. Your friends were not
    > raised properly nor do they have any respect for you.


    I'll respectfully disagree in this particular case because
    Serene does expect it as part of both parties' (her friends'
    and -- most importantly -- her's) normal behavior.

    I don't have such a liberal open-table policy but all three
    daughter-units are not above asking if friends can stay for
    mealtimes. Chances are quite high that I'll allow it (unless
    we're headed out or on a restricted schedule.) For us, pasta,
    rice, and bread usually supplement the protein and greenery. I
    don't do a lot of sauces for the pasta because too many of the
    kids come from families that keep things plain. The first time
    I served saffron rice, the group of kids were stunned that rice
    could be turned yellow and have such a pleasant scent...
    <shrug>

    My Sainted Mother(tm) certainly had a similarly liberal meal
    policy as Serene. No one, ever, got turned away from her
    tables; if you were there when she finished cooking, you sat
    and ate with us. A quick call home was all that was needed. Of
    course, she was also very gifted at improvising and stretching
    meals. We served everything family-style so nothing was
    pre-portioned or controlled. You simply took enough so that
    everyone could get a single helping and then, if you wanted
    more of a dish, you took seconds.

    If the same "guests" are always turning up for mealtime, I can
    see where it would become old -- very quickly. (I know a couple
    collej kids and software engineers that pulled that nonsense.)
    That's where being a little more direct by sending them to the
    store with a list would assist in halting their aberrant
    behaviors. Otherwise, if it's working, it don't need fixing.

    The Ranger



  16. #16
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner

    On Mon 16 Jun 2008 08:51:13a, Dimitri told us...

    >
    > "Serene Vannoy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> My friends know that 7pm is dinner here, and around once a week,
    >> someone takes me up on my open-door dinner policy and crashes dinner. I
    >> love this. Sometimes it's easy to make another plate, because there's a
    >> pot of chili on the stove or something. Tonight it was a little more
    >> tricky, since I had just enough of the main dish for three people. It
    >> was store-bought ravioli, for which I'd made a tomato sauce. I'd also
    >> roasted a couple heads of garlic to put on slices of baguette, and
    >> roasted a small amount of green beans (enough for three generous
    >> servings, or four small ones).
    >>
    >> My guest showed up around 6:45, so I quickly got out another pot and
    >> boiled up some spaghetti. I tossed it with butter/salt/pepper/parmesan,
    >> and cut more slices of baguette. The guest helped with putting roasted
    >> garlic and butter on the bread slices, and dinner went off without a
    >> hitch, and without a mention of having planned on having less food. She
    >> may have thought it was weird having two pasta dishes on the plate, but
    >> she didn't say anything. I figured, heck, you can get half-and-half at
    >> some Italian places. :-)
    >>
    >> Do you have any stretching-dinner stories? I know some of you don't
    >> like it when people show up unannounced, and I totally understand that,
    >> but my friends have my express permission to do so, so any intimation
    >> that she was being rude will be dismissed as silly.
    >>
    >> Serene

    >
    > Yes, it is considered impolite if not RUDE to show up for dinner
    > unannounced. Your friends were not raised properly nor do they have any
    > respect for you.
    >
    > The next time it happens either show them this answer and/or send them
    > to the store to get the food they want to eat.
    >
    > That's down right unacceptable behavior.
    >
    > Giving them permission to do so in in my opinion reinforcing bad
    > behavior and impoliteness.


    I tend to agree with you, but if someone has established an "open door"
    policy for friends casually stopping by at dinnertime to share the meal,
    then it can hardly be considered rude.

    When I was growing up, the family of one of my close school friends were
    Scottish. If I happened to stop by their house around dinner time (I had
    little time awareness then), my friend's mother would say, "you're just in
    time to have dinner with us, come on in." It was always a sincere offer,
    and I always helped with the cleanup.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Monday, 06(VI)/16(XVI)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    -------------------------------------------
    You're not losing more hair, you're
    gaining more scalp.
    -------------------------------------------




  17. #17
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner

    On Mon 16 Jun 2008 08:51:13a, Dimitri told us...

    >
    > "Serene Vannoy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> My friends know that 7pm is dinner here, and around once a week,
    >> someone takes me up on my open-door dinner policy and crashes dinner. I
    >> love this. Sometimes it's easy to make another plate, because there's a
    >> pot of chili on the stove or something. Tonight it was a little more
    >> tricky, since I had just enough of the main dish for three people. It
    >> was store-bought ravioli, for which I'd made a tomato sauce. I'd also
    >> roasted a couple heads of garlic to put on slices of baguette, and
    >> roasted a small amount of green beans (enough for three generous
    >> servings, or four small ones).
    >>
    >> My guest showed up around 6:45, so I quickly got out another pot and
    >> boiled up some spaghetti. I tossed it with butter/salt/pepper/parmesan,
    >> and cut more slices of baguette. The guest helped with putting roasted
    >> garlic and butter on the bread slices, and dinner went off without a
    >> hitch, and without a mention of having planned on having less food. She
    >> may have thought it was weird having two pasta dishes on the plate, but
    >> she didn't say anything. I figured, heck, you can get half-and-half at
    >> some Italian places. :-)
    >>
    >> Do you have any stretching-dinner stories? I know some of you don't
    >> like it when people show up unannounced, and I totally understand that,
    >> but my friends have my express permission to do so, so any intimation
    >> that she was being rude will be dismissed as silly.
    >>
    >> Serene

    >
    > Yes, it is considered impolite if not RUDE to show up for dinner
    > unannounced. Your friends were not raised properly nor do they have any
    > respect for you.
    >
    > The next time it happens either show them this answer and/or send them
    > to the store to get the food they want to eat.
    >
    > That's down right unacceptable behavior.
    >
    > Giving them permission to do so in in my opinion reinforcing bad
    > behavior and impoliteness.


    I tend to agree with you, but if someone has established an "open door"
    policy for friends casually stopping by at dinnertime to share the meal,
    then it can hardly be considered rude.

    When I was growing up, the family of one of my close school friends were
    Scottish. If I happened to stop by their house around dinner time (I had
    little time awareness then), my friend's mother would say, "you're just in
    time to have dinner with us, come on in." It was always a sincere offer,
    and I always helped with the cleanup.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Monday, 06(VI)/16(XVI)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    -------------------------------------------
    You're not losing more hair, you're
    gaining more scalp.
    -------------------------------------------




  18. #18
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner


    "The Ranger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ndwidth...
    > Dimitri <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:n_v5k.1707$[email protected]..
    > [snip Unannouced Extra Guests]
    >
    >> Yes, it is considered impolite if not RUDE to show
    >> up for dinner unannounced. Your friends were not
    >> raised properly nor do they have any respect for you.

    >
    > I'll respectfully disagree in this particular case because Serene does
    > expect it as part of both parties' (her friends' and -- most
    > importantly -- her's) normal behavior.
    >
    > I don't have such a liberal open-table policy but all three daughter-units
    > are not above asking if friends can stay for mealtimes. Chances are quite
    > high that I'll allow it (unless we're headed out or on a restricted
    > schedule.) For us, pasta, rice, and bread usually supplement the protein
    > and greenery. I don't do a lot of sauces for the pasta because too many of
    > the kids come from families that keep things plain. The first time I
    > served saffron rice, the group of kids were stunned that rice could be
    > turned yellow and have such a pleasant scent... <shrug>


    When my girls were growing up we had the same type of policy and frequently
    had guests for dinner. My nickname was "enough for an army" However kids
    asking if their friends can stay with enough time to modify the dinner is
    very different than people just showing up and expecting dinner. The the
    GOOD OLD DAYS it was considered impolite to just show up at anyones house
    without calling first unless you were invited or needed help.

    Maybe my environment to some was too formal but I refer to think of it as
    respect for others. To this day I will still not just show up at anyone's
    home without a call and an OK first - that even applies to my 4 daughters,
    it's just common courtesy.


    --
    Old Scoundrel

    (AKA Dimitri)




  19. #19
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner


    "The Ranger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ndwidth...
    > Dimitri <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:n_v5k.1707$[email protected]..
    > [snip Unannouced Extra Guests]
    >
    >> Yes, it is considered impolite if not RUDE to show
    >> up for dinner unannounced. Your friends were not
    >> raised properly nor do they have any respect for you.

    >
    > I'll respectfully disagree in this particular case because Serene does
    > expect it as part of both parties' (her friends' and -- most
    > importantly -- her's) normal behavior.
    >
    > I don't have such a liberal open-table policy but all three daughter-units
    > are not above asking if friends can stay for mealtimes. Chances are quite
    > high that I'll allow it (unless we're headed out or on a restricted
    > schedule.) For us, pasta, rice, and bread usually supplement the protein
    > and greenery. I don't do a lot of sauces for the pasta because too many of
    > the kids come from families that keep things plain. The first time I
    > served saffron rice, the group of kids were stunned that rice could be
    > turned yellow and have such a pleasant scent... <shrug>


    When my girls were growing up we had the same type of policy and frequently
    had guests for dinner. My nickname was "enough for an army" However kids
    asking if their friends can stay with enough time to modify the dinner is
    very different than people just showing up and expecting dinner. The the
    GOOD OLD DAYS it was considered impolite to just show up at anyones house
    without calling first unless you were invited or needed help.

    Maybe my environment to some was too formal but I refer to think of it as
    respect for others. To this day I will still not just show up at anyone's
    home without a call and an OK first - that even applies to my 4 daughters,
    it's just common courtesy.


    --
    Old Scoundrel

    (AKA Dimitri)




  20. #20
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Stretching dinner

    On Jun 16, 8:51*am, "Dimitri" <Dimitr...@prodigy.net> wrote:
    > "Serene Vannoy" <ser...@serenepages.org> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    > > My friends know that 7pm is dinner here, and around once a week, someone
    > > takes me up on my open-door dinner policy and crashes dinner. I love this.
    > > [snip]
    > > Do you have any stretching-dinner stories? *I know some of you don't like
    > > it when people show up unannounced, and I totally understand that, but my
    > > friends have my express permission to do so, so any intimation that she
    > > was being rude will be dismissed as silly.

    >
    > Yes, it is considered impolite if not RUDE to show up for dinner
    > unannounced. Your friends were not raised properly nor do they have any
    > respect for you.
    >
    > The next time it happens either show them this answer and/or send them to
    > the store to get the food they want to eat.
    >
    > That's down right unacceptable behavior.
    >
    > Giving them permission to do so in in my opinion reinforcing bad behavior
    > and impoliteness.
    >

    That really is a scoundrel's response. How is it unacceptable if she
    invites it? How is it rude to accept what amounts to a standing
    invitation? Just because you may be too rigid to cope with or welcome
    unplanned guests doesn't mean that your way is the only way. Her
    openness and flexibility have it all over your toe-the-line
    attitude.

    Our friends are welcome any time and they know it. That's part of
    what defines them as friends. Of course they are as considerate as
    circumstances allow, but we don't impose conditions on one another.
    Friends don't do that. -aem

Page 1 of 10 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32