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Thread: Stovetop Barbque grill

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Stovetop Barbque grill

    I was at a home show last week, and one of the books was offering a
    grill that you place on top of your stove to barbque things. Is it
    worth it? Could you just use a iron frying pan, plus a grate of some
    sort like you might have already from your outdoor barbque to
    accomplish the same thing. The price was around 15 or 20 bucks.

    Tom

  2. #2
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: Stovetop Barbque grill

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I was at a home show last week, and one of the books was offering a
    > grill that you place on top of your stove to barbque things. Is it
    > worth it? Could you just use a iron frying pan, plus a grate of some
    > sort like you might have already from your outdoor barbque to
    > accomplish the same thing. The price was around 15 or 20 bucks.


    If it was at a home show booth, I would imagine it would have to be just
    like having an outdoor pit.
    --
    Dave
    www.davebbq.com



  3. #3
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Stovetop Barbque grill

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I was at a home show last week, and one of the books was offering a
    > grill that you place on top of your stove to barbque things. Is it
    > worth it? Could you just use a iron frying pan, plus a grate of some
    > sort like you might have already from your outdoor barbque to
    > accomplish the same thing. The price was around 15 or 20 bucks.
    >
    > Tom
    >

    It won't be grilling and it won't be BBQ (as in ribs). But you can
    certainly get a cast iron pan that has a raised surface which creates those
    "grill marks" if that's what you want Lodge makes several of them,
    including one for a single burner that doubles as a griddle. Lodge stuff
    isn't cheap but it's very durable.

    http://tinyurl.com/zrpv5

    Jill


  4. #4
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Stovetop Barbque grill

    "[email protected]" wrote:

    > I was at a home show last week, and one of the books was offering a
    > grill that you place on top of your stove to barbque things. Is it
    > worth it? Could you just use a iron frying pan, plus a grate of some
    > sort like you might have already from your outdoor barbque to
    > accomplish the same thing. The price was around 15 or 20 bucks.


    A grill pan...... cast iron pan with ridges?
    They sure are worth it. I have one and use it a lot when it is too cold
    or miserable to BBQ.




  5. #5
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Stovetop Barbque grill

    On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 13:22:26 -0700 (PDT), "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I was at a home show last week, and one of the books was offering a
    >grill that you place on top of your stove to barbque things. Is it
    >worth it? Could you just use a iron frying pan, plus a grate of some
    >sort like you might have already from your outdoor barbque to
    >accomplish the same thing. The price was around 15 or 20 bucks.
    >
    >Tom


    My S.O. came home sometime back from a resale store with one she paid
    a buck for. It had ceramic bricks in it. It was new in the box with
    all the paperwork. I never used it and sneaked it into the trash when
    we moved last summer.

    Lou

  6. #6
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Stovetop Barbque grill


    "Lou Decruss" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 13:22:26 -0700 (PDT), "[email protected]"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I was at a home show last week, and one of the books was offering a
    >>grill that you place on top of your stove to barbque things.
    >>
    >>Tom

    >
    > My S.O. came home sometime back from a resale store with one she paid
    > a buck for. It had ceramic bricks in it.
    >
    > Lou
    >
    >

    What was the purpose of the ceramic bricks?

    Jill


  7. #7
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Stovetop Barbque grill

    On Thu, 20 Mar 2008 08:36:47 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Lou Decruss" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >> On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 13:22:26 -0700 (PDT), "[email protected]"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I was at a home show last week, and one of the books was offering a
    >>>grill that you place on top of your stove to barbque things.
    >>>
    >>>Tom

    >>
    >> My S.O. came home sometime back from a resale store with one she paid
    >> a buck for. It had ceramic bricks in it.
    >>
    >> Lou
    >>
    >>

    >What was the purpose of the ceramic bricks?


    I guess to collect heat and sizzle like a real grill would do. Some
    gas grills use them to. It's supposed to add flavor. I found it to
    be just another piece to store. It was made very well, but I knew I'd
    never use it, so it went bye-bye.

    Lou

  8. #8
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Stovetop Barbque grill


    "Lou Decruss" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Thu, 20 Mar 2008 08:36:47 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Lou Decruss" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected] ..
    >>> On Wed, 19 Mar 2008 13:22:26 -0700 (PDT), "[email protected]"
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I was at a home show last week, and one of the books was offering a
    >>>>grill that you place on top of your stove to barbque things.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> My S.O. came home sometime back from a resale store with one she paid
    >>> a buck for. It had ceramic bricks in it.
    >>>
    >>> Lou
    >>>
    >>>

    >>What was the purpose of the ceramic bricks?

    >
    > I guess to collect heat and sizzle like a real grill would do. Some
    > gas grills use them to. It's supposed to add flavor. I found it to
    > be just another piece to store. It was made very well, but I knew I'd
    > never use it, so it went bye-bye.
    >
    > Lou
    >

    Ah, okay. I have a Mirro (I think) thing that was given to me some 20 years
    ago that fits over the small burner (well, an electric burner, at any rate)
    on the stovetop; it's a two part thing with an outer ring to hold water.
    The "grill" (heh) surface has hash-marks and is sloped so the fat from the
    meat drips into the water. It actually works pretty well for burgers but I
    wouldn't confuse it with grilling It's easier to use a broiler pan and
    the broiler element in the oven. It has a much larger cooking surface and
    you can easily broil steaks, chicken, etc., if outdoor grilling isn't an
    option.

    Jill


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