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Thread: Stop all that pointless clarifying!

  1. #1
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Stop all that pointless clarifying!




    The only earthly reason to clarify butter is for pan-frying. If you're
    making a sauce or a dip, try emulsifying the butter. You'll need some
    acid, such as lemon juice or vinegar or wine. What you do is reduce
    the acid with the flavorings, then beat in the butter gradually. The
    French have done this for centuries and they got it exactly right.

    For artichokes: straight-up lemon butter. For fish: beurre blanc or
    beurre noisette. For meat: garlic butter based on white wine.

    Now stop all that pointless clarifying and do some proper cooking!

    BTW, I never bother clarifying butter for pan-frying. I just mix half
    butter and half oil. You get more butter flavor than from clarified,
    and you succeed in raising the smoke point.



  2. #2
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: Stop all that pointless clarifying!


    On 29-Aug-2012, George M. Middius <[email protected]> wrote:

    > BTW, I never bother clarifying butter for pan-frying. I just mix half
    > butter and half oil. You get more butter flavor than from clarified,
    > and you succeed in raising the smoke point.


    And the flavor of browned butter is pretty tasty; one of my favorite pasta
    dishes is spaghetti with browned butter and grated cheese.
    --

    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  3. #3
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Stop all that pointless clarifying!

    "l, not -l" wrote:
    >
    > On 29-Aug-2012, George M. Middius <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > BTW, I never bother clarifying butter for pan-frying. I just mix half
    > > butter and half oil. You get more butter flavor than from clarified,
    > > and you succeed in raising the smoke point.

    >
    > And the flavor of browned butter is pretty tasty; one of my favorite pasta
    > dishes is spaghetti with browned butter and grated cheese.


    Whenever I cooked fried eggs, I use a small amount of butter in the frying
    pan. I will carefully watch the heating. Once it just starts to brown, I
    add in the eggs. Seems to give the flavor a slight kick.

    Gary

  4. #4
    Christopher M. Guest

    Default Re: Stop all that pointless clarifying!


    "l, not -l" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:k1locm$98n$[email protected]..
    >
    > On 29-Aug-2012, George M. Middius <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> BTW, I never bother clarifying butter for pan-frying. I just mix half
    >> butter and half oil. You get more butter flavor than from clarified,
    >> and you succeed in raising the smoke point.

    >
    > And the flavor of browned butter is pretty tasty; one of my favorite pasta
    > dishes is spaghetti with browned butter and grated cheese.


    Do they do that in Italian cuisine, or is that more German?


    W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)



  5. #5
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Stop all that pointless clarifying!

    Christopher M. wrote:

    > >> BTW, I never bother clarifying butter for pan-frying. I just mix half
    > >> butter and half oil. You get more butter flavor than from clarified,
    > >> and you succeed in raising the smoke point.

    > >
    > > And the flavor of browned butter is pretty tasty; one of my favorite pasta
    > > dishes is spaghetti with browned butter and grated cheese.

    >
    > Do they do that in Italian cuisine, or is that more German?


    If you were allowed in the kitchen, you could do it yourself.



  6. #6
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Stop all that pointless clarifying!

    On Aug 29, 8:56*am, George M. Middius <glanb...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > The only earthly reason to clarify butter is for pan-frying. If you're
    > making a sauce or a dip, try emulsifying the butter. You'll need some
    > acid, such as lemon juice or vinegar or wine. What you do is reduce
    > the acid with the flavorings, then beat in the butter gradually. The
    > French have done this for centuries and they got it exactly right.
    >
    > For artichokes: straight-up lemon butter. For fish: beurre blanc or
    > beurre noisette. For meat: garlic butter based on white wine.
    >
    > Now stop all that pointless clarifying and do some proper cooking!
    >
    > BTW, I never bother clarifying butter for pan-frying. I just mix half
    > butter and half oil. You get more butter flavor than from clarified,
    > and you succeed in raising the smoke point.


    well......there's a difference in plain clarified butter and ghee.
    I make ghee. The slow cooking process results in a lightly nutty
    flavor which I like a lot. I use ghee for some things and regular
    butter for everything else.

    I agree with you that the French methodology works best for a lot of
    things but I still like ghee for Indian dishes.


  7. #7
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Stop all that pointless clarifying!

    ImStillMags wrote:

    > > The only earthly reason to clarify butter is for pan-frying. If you're
    > > making a sauce or a dip, try emulsifying the butter. You'll need some
    > > acid, such as lemon juice or vinegar or wine. What you do is reduce
    > > the acid with the flavorings, then beat in the butter gradually. The
    > > French have done this for centuries and they got it exactly right.
    > >
    > > For artichokes: straight-up lemon butter. For fish: beurre blanc or
    > > beurre noisette. For meat: garlic butter based on white wine.
    > >
    > > Now stop all that pointless clarifying and do some proper cooking!
    > >
    > > BTW, I never bother clarifying butter for pan-frying. I just mix half
    > > butter and half oil. You get more butter flavor than from clarified,
    > > and you succeed in raising the smoke point.

    >
    > well......there's a difference in plain clarified butter and ghee.
    > I make ghee. The slow cooking process results in a lightly nutty
    > flavor which I like a lot. I use ghee for some things and regular
    > butter for everything else.
    >
    > I agree with you that the French methodology works best for a lot of
    > things but I still like ghee for Indian dishes.


    Where do you keep your yak?



  8. #8
    gtr Guest

    Default Re: Stop all that pointless clarifying!

    On 2012-08-29 23:20:59 +0000, ImStillMags said:

    > well......there's a difference in plain clarified butter and ghee.
    > I make ghee. The slow cooking process results in a lightly nutty
    > flavor which I like a lot. I use ghee for some things and regular
    > butter for everything else.
    >
    > I agree with you that the French methodology works best for a lot of
    > things but I still like ghee for Indian dishes.


    Perhaps my experiene with ghee and clarified butter isn't diverse
    enough. Particularly when using ghee in Indian dishes, where many other
    seasonings can have significant impact on the flavor profile, I'm feel
    quite sure I couldn't tell the difference.

    My understanding with both is that it has to do with cooking hotter
    than you can with butter. But between ghee and clarified butter and
    butter, I've never found a significant different. Tasting the material
    right in the pan prior to its use in cooking something else, I'm think
    I could tell the difference. But whenever you "brown" something, here
    with clarified butter to produce ghee, it also depends on how brown you
    consider brown. I had a girlfriend that regularly burned pork chops
    and this was what she called "browning".


  9. #9
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Stop all that pointless clarifying!

    gtr wrote:

    > But whenever you "brown" something, here
    > with clarified butter to produce ghee, it also depends on how brown you
    > consider brown. I had a girlfriend that regularly burned pork chops
    > and this was what she called "browning".


    How dreadful. Is that why you traded her to sqwishy?



  10. #10
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Stop all that pointless clarifying!

    On 8/29/2012 11:56 AM, George M. Middius wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > The only earthly reason to clarify butter is for pan-frying. If you're
    > making a sauce or a dip, try emulsifying the butter. You'll need some
    > acid, such as lemon juice or vinegar or wine. What you do is reduce
    > the acid with the flavorings, then beat in the butter gradually. The
    > French have done this for centuries and they got it exactly right.
    >
    > For artichokes: straight-up lemon butter. For fish: beurre blanc or
    > beurre noisette. For meat: garlic butter based on white wine.
    >
    > Now stop all that pointless clarifying and do some proper cooking!
    >
    > BTW, I never bother clarifying butter for pan-frying. I just mix half
    > butter and half oil. You get more butter flavor than from clarified,
    > and you succeed in raising the smoke point.
    >
    >

    I cook with butter and olive oil like that often.

  11. #11
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Stop all that pointless clarifying!

    Cheryl <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On 8/29/2012 11:56 AM, George M. Middius wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> The only earthly reason to clarify butter is for pan-frying. If
    >> you're making a sauce or a dip, try emulsifying the butter. You'll
    >> need some acid, such as lemon juice or vinegar or wine. What you do
    >> is reduce the acid with the flavorings, then beat in the butter
    >> gradually. The French have done this for centuries and they got it
    >> exactly right. For artichokes: straight-up lemon butter. For fish: beurre
    >> blanc or
    >> beurre noisette. For meat: garlic butter based on white wine.
    >>
    >> Now stop all that pointless clarifying and do some proper cooking!
    >>
    >> BTW, I never bother clarifying butter for pan-frying. I just mix half
    >> butter and half oil. You get more butter flavor than from clarified,
    >> and you succeed in raising the smoke point.
    >>
    >>

    > I cook with butter and olive oil like that often.


    There will still be milk solids present in that method which will still burn
    just as easily as they do without the olive oil. I use the method but for
    specific flavor, not for heat resistance. Shrimp scampi style cooked with
    olive oil and euro butter works fine but that doesn't require dancing around
    the edge of the smoke point.

    MartyB



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