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Thread: Stock Making Question

  1. #1
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Stock Making Question

    I usually make stock with roasted bones leftover from dinner, a
    little meat on them, but not a whole hunk of meat. However, I am trying
    to make some stock from lamb shanks and I would like to save at least a
    little bit of the meat to eat. Should I just remove the meat from the
    bone once it is soft and return the bones and scraps to the pot? Or am
    I stuck getting another package of meat out and feeding these scraps to
    the chickens and turkeys?

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  2. #2
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question

    Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:
    > I usually make stock with roasted bones leftover from dinner, a
    > little meat on them, but not a whole hunk of meat. However, I am trying
    > to make some stock from lamb shanks and I would like to save at least a
    > little bit of the meat to eat. Should I just remove the meat from the
    > bone once it is soft and return the bones and scraps to the pot? Or am
    > I stuck getting another package of meat out and feeding these scraps to
    > the chickens and turkeys?



    My mother always made beef soup by starting with a meaty bone. The small
    meat bits were then removed and shredded after it cooked and returned to
    the pot.
    I've never had such good soup as hers was.

  3. #3
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question

    On Jan 10, 10:10*am, Ranée at Arabian Knits <arabiankn...@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    > * *I usually make stock with roasted bones leftover from dinner, a
    > little meat on them, but not a whole hunk of meat. *However, I am trying
    > to make some stock from lamb shanks and I would like to save at least a
    > little bit of the meat to eat. *Should I just remove the meat from the
    > bone once it is soft and return the bones and scraps to the pot? *Or am
    > I stuck getting another package of meat out and feeding these scraps to
    > the chickens and turkeys?
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ranee @ Arabian Knits
    >
    > "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13
    >
    > http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/


    Once the meat is fall off the bone tender, take it out if you plan on
    eating it. If you leave it in till the very end of the stock making
    process it will be completely devoid of everything except the dry
    strings. Then it's chicken feed.

    By all means remove it if you want to eat it. The bones will finish
    rendering out all their goodie for your stock.

  4. #4
    Dora Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question

    Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:
    > I usually make stock with roasted bones leftover from dinner, a
    > little meat on them, but not a whole hunk of meat. However, I am
    > trying to make some stock from lamb shanks and I would like to save
    > at least a little bit of the meat to eat. Should I just remove the
    > meat from the bone once it is soft and return the bones and scraps
    > to
    > the pot? Or am I stuck getting another package of meat out and
    > feeding these scraps to the chickens and turkeys?
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ranee @ Arabian Knits


    Ranee, my own preference is to remove the majority of the meat first,
    before simmering the bones. The bones are what flavor the stock -
    simmering the meat just makes the meat tasteless.


  5. #5
    Joseph Littleshoes Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question



    Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:
    > I usually make stock with roasted bones leftover from dinner, a
    > little meat on them, but not a whole hunk of meat. However, I am trying
    > to make some stock from lamb shanks and I would like to save at least a
    > little bit of the meat to eat. Should I just remove the meat from the
    > bone once it is soft and return the bones and scraps to the pot? Or am
    > I stuck getting another package of meat out and feeding these scraps to
    > the chickens and turkeys?
    >
    > Regards,


    Sure, when the flesh is just cooked remove the meat you wish to eat from
    the shanks. Then return the remaining bones to & meat scraps the stock.

    When you do this again, remove the meat from the bones first, brown the
    meat in hot oil and then add to the stock.

    Some cooks will make a stock from bones which are gently simmered for 12
    - 15 hours, this is then used to simmer the raw or browned meats in for
    another 12 hours or so.

    In my experience a good meat/bone stock can be had from as little as 3 -
    6 hours of cooking.

    Classic French cooking bones out the shanks first, breaks up and then
    browns the bones before adding them to the stock pot. Same with the
    meat, brown first, some going so far as to cut the meat into a mall dice
    and fry brown in hot fat and then cover with some prepared stock and
    boil until it is reduce to a glaze, repeating this process 3 - 4 times
    and then adding it to the stock being prepared. All the while skimming,
    skimming, skimming, when done, strain, and defat.
    --
    Mr. Joseph Paul Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.

    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  6. #6
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    ImStillMags <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Jan 10, 10:10*am, Ranée at Arabian Knits <arabiankn...@gmail.com>
    > wrote:
    > > * *I usually make stock with roasted bones leftover from dinner, a
    > > little meat on them, but not a whole hunk of meat. *However, I am trying
    > > to make some stock from lamb shanks and I would like to save at least a
    > > little bit of the meat to eat. *Should I just remove the meat from the
    > > bone once it is soft and return the bones and scraps to the pot? *Or am
    > > I stuck getting another package of meat out and feeding these scraps to
    > > the chickens and turkeys?
    > >

    > Once the meat is fall off the bone tender, take it out if you plan on
    > eating it. If you leave it in till the very end of the stock making
    > process it will be completely devoid of everything except the dry
    > strings. Then it's chicken feed.


    I knew I couldn't leave them to the end, but I wasn't sure if I'd
    wreck the stock by removing the meat early. Thank you.

    > By all means remove it if you want to eat it. The bones will finish
    > rendering out all their goodie for your stock.


    That is exactly what I needed to know.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  7. #7
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Goomba <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:
    > > I usually make stock with roasted bones leftover from dinner, a
    > > little meat on them, but not a whole hunk of meat. However, I am trying
    > > to make some stock from lamb shanks and I would like to save at least a
    > > little bit of the meat to eat. Should I just remove the meat from the
    > > bone once it is soft and return the bones and scraps to the pot? Or am
    > > I stuck getting another package of meat out and feeding these scraps to
    > > the chickens and turkeys?

    >
    >
    > My mother always made beef soup by starting with a meaty bone. The small
    > meat bits were then removed and shredded after it cooked and returned to
    > the pot.
    > I've never had such good soup as hers was.


    That was my plan, not soup, but to include the meat in the dish with
    the stock. I'm glad I can do it.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  8. #8
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Dora" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:
    > > I usually make stock with roasted bones leftover from dinner, a
    > > little meat on them, but not a whole hunk of meat. However, I am
    > > trying to make some stock from lamb shanks and I would like to save
    > > at least a little bit of the meat to eat. Should I just remove the
    > > meat from the bone once it is soft and return the bones and scraps
    > > to
    > > the pot? Or am I stuck getting another package of meat out and
    > > feeding these scraps to the chickens and turkeys?

    >
    > Ranee, my own preference is to remove the majority of the meat first,
    > before simmering the bones. The bones are what flavor the stock -
    > simmering the meat just makes the meat tasteless.


    Really? I was thinking of removing it when it was cooked the way
    meat in a stew/braise is cooked.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  9. #9
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question

    On 10/01/2011 3:16 PM, Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:
    >
    >> Ranee, my own preference is to remove the majority of the meat first,
    >> before simmering the bones. The bones are what flavor the stock -
    >> simmering the meat just makes the meat tasteless.

    >
    > Really? I was thinking of removing it when it was cooked the way
    > meat in a stew/braise is cooked.


    I always remove the meat when I have to thicken the sauce in a braised
    dish and it has to be boiled. Boiling toughens the meat and robs it of
    its flavour.

  10. #10
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question

    On Mon, 10 Jan 2011 13:41:06 -0500, Goomba <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:
    >> I usually make stock with roasted bones leftover from dinner, a
    >> little meat on them, but not a whole hunk of meat. However, I am trying
    >> to make some stock from lamb shanks and I would like to save at least a
    >> little bit of the meat to eat. Should I just remove the meat from the
    >> bone once it is soft and return the bones and scraps to the pot? Or am
    >> I stuck getting another package of meat out and feeding these scraps to
    >> the chickens and turkeys?

    >
    >
    >My mother always made beef soup by starting with a meaty bone. The small
    >meat bits were then removed and shredded after it cooked and returned to
    >the pot.
    >I've never had such good soup as hers was.


    That's because in your mom's time butchers offered meaty soup bones.

    The more meat the better the stock. You can't make decent stock with
    heavily trimmed bones... bones per se contribute no flavor
    whatsoever... the connective tissue (the sheath covering and the
    sinew/tendons at the ends adds gelatine but adds zero flavor (plain
    gelatine is totally flavorless). People began using bones to make
    stock because not all that long ago soup bones were still free, and
    they did contain quite a bit of meat. Nowadays it's best to buy an
    inexpensive tough cut of beef to make beef stock. The boiled meat can
    be added back to the stock, eaten heavily seasoned on bread, or used
    for force meat (a delicacy). Poultry bones should never be broken for
    stock, fowl bones are hollow but contain some very foul/bitter debris
    (birds are not mammals, they have a very different anatomy). From
    what I've read how most folks here make stock they would be far better
    off using bouillion cubes... very simple rule of cooking; garbage in,
    garbage out.

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question

    On Mon, 10 Jan 2011 10:10:36 -0800, Ranée at Arabian Knits
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I usually make stock with roasted bones leftover from dinner, a
    > little meat on them, but not a whole hunk of meat. However, I am trying
    > to make some stock from lamb shanks and I would like to save at least a
    > little bit of the meat to eat. Should I just remove the meat from the
    > bone once it is soft and return the bones and scraps to the pot? Or am
    > I stuck getting another package of meat out and feeding these scraps to
    > the chickens and turkeys?
    >

    I'd take if off the bones when it's ready to eat and keep on cooking.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  12. #12
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question

    In article <N0KWo.42743$[email protected] >,
    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 10/01/2011 3:16 PM, Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:
    > >
    > >> Ranee, my own preference is to remove the majority of the meat first,
    > >> before simmering the bones. The bones are what flavor the stock -
    > >> simmering the meat just makes the meat tasteless.

    > >
    > > Really? I was thinking of removing it when it was cooked the way
    > > meat in a stew/braise is cooked.

    >
    > I always remove the meat when I have to thicken the sauce in a braised
    > dish and it has to be boiled. Boiling toughens the meat and robs it of
    > its flavour.


    Who boils stock?

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  13. #13
    Portland Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question

    On Jan 11, 12:20*am, Ranée at Arabian Knits <arabiankn...@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    > In article <N0KWo.42743$522.10...@unlimited.newshosting.com >,
    > *Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    >
    > > On 10/01/2011 3:16 PM, Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:

    >
    > > >> Ranee, my own preference is to remove the majority of the meat first,
    > > >> before simmering the bones. *The bones are what flavor the stock -
    > > >> simmering the meat just makes the meat tasteless.

    >
    > > > * * Really? *I was thinking of removing it when it was cooked the way
    > > > meat in a stew/braise is cooked.

    >
    > > I always remove the meat when I have to thicken the sauce in a braised
    > > dish and it has to be boiled. Boiling toughens the meat and robs it of
    > > its flavour.

    >
    > * *Who boils stock?
    >


    I boil stock for about 5 minutes and skim, skim and skim. Then I turn
    it down for a real slow simmer and add the vegetables: Onions,
    Celery, Carrot and herbs in a cheese cloth.

    > Regards,
    > Ranee @ Arabian Knits
    >
    > "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13
    >
    > http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/



  14. #14
    Joseph Littleshoes Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question



    Ranée wrote:
    > Dave Smith wrote:
    >> Ranée wrote:
    >>
    >>>>Ranee, my own preference is to remove the majority of the meat first,
    >>>>before simmering the bones. The bones are what flavor the stock -
    >>>>simmering the meat just makes the meat tasteless.
    >>>
    >>> Really? I was thinking of removing it when it was cooked the way
    >>>meat in a stew/braise is cooked.

    >>
    >>I always remove the meat when I have to thicken the sauce in a braised
    >>dish and it has to be boiled. Boiling toughens the meat and robs it of
    >>its flavour.

    >
    >
    > Who boils stock?
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ranee


    Its like broth and bouillon and soup, the are interchangeable terms in
    American vernacular usage.

    Boil, simmer, stew, braise, poach, even pole when it is considered a
    type of steaming of meat.

    And all that, from mere "kissing" of the liquid, a "shimmer" or other
    slight vibration of the cooking liquids surface area to a full blow
    "roiling boil" i prefer something above a mere simmer on the liquids
    surface as it simmers, even if that's a low boil i have turned the stock
    down too after getting it going to a roiling boil in the beginning,
    which i do because i start the meat stock in cold water and skim
    assiduously as it comes to a BOIL and remains then at a BOIL for 10 - 20
    minutes while i assiduously skim.

    After which the stock is turned down to a low boil or simmer and left to
    cook on its own for however many hours with only the occasionally skimming.

    I prefer the boiling to soften & tenderize the large cuts of meats,
    joints, steaks & etc., especially beef. I like the very tender beef
    that such long slow and generally low cooking in liquid produces with
    the beef. "Boiled Beef" ala Anglaise with carrots

    Chicken (fowl), pork, lamb, mutton, veal, fish (im not big on game
    furred or feathered) are all more tender than the beef to begin with so
    don't need to cook as long to achieve the tenderness i prefer.

    And if i want to cook beef quickly, and not for hours and hours to make
    it fork tender, i slice it thin or cut it small, fry or *ahem* "saute"
    in hot oil to either fully cook (and the resultant meats are fork tender
    because of the cut & size more than the cooking of) or i sometimes only
    lightly brown these thin or small pieces of meats and then set to
    braise, stew or simmer in a cooking liquid for 15 minutes to an hour
    depending on what im making.

    Of course there are cuts of steak that are almost tender enough for me
    but even the best of rib eyes, and filet mignons are not as tender as i
    would like them to be with the traditional quick cooking of them.

    I am always amused by the warnings about boiling a chicken too long and
    making it "tough" i LOL when i hear the same warning about boiled eggs,
    how "tough" can any chicken or egg be? even if it is over cooked?

    A favored dish of beef, onions and beer has the strips of beef steak
    simmered in beer after browning in butter with thin sliced onions and
    garlic for 1/2 - 1 hour which not only makes the meat even more tender
    but the longer the meat simmers the more flavorful the resulting beer
    sauce is.
    --

    Mr. Joseph Paul Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.

    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  15. #15
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Portland <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Jan 11, 12:20*am, Ranée at Arabian Knits <arabiankn...@gmail.com>
    > wrote:
    > > In article <N0KWo.42743$522.10...@unlimited.newshosting.com >,
    > > *Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    > >
    > > > On 10/01/2011 3:16 PM, Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:

    > >
    > > > >> Ranee, my own preference is to remove the majority of the meat first,
    > > > >> before simmering the bones. *The bones are what flavor the stock -
    > > > >> simmering the meat just makes the meat tasteless.

    > >
    > > > > * * Really? *I was thinking of removing it when it was cooked the way
    > > > > meat in a stew/braise is cooked.

    > >
    > > > I always remove the meat when I have to thicken the sauce in a braised
    > > > dish and it has to be boiled. Boiling toughens the meat and robs it of
    > > > its flavour.

    > >
    > > * *Who boils stock?
    > >

    >
    > I boil stock for about 5 minutes and skim, skim and skim. Then I turn
    > it down for a real slow simmer and add the vegetables: Onions,
    > Celery, Carrot and herbs in a cheese cloth.


    I simmer it the whole time.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  16. #16
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Joseph Littleshoes <[email protected]> wrote:

    > And all that, from mere "kissing" of the liquid, a "shimmer" or other
    > slight vibration of the cooking liquids surface area to a full blow
    > "roiling boil" i prefer something above a mere simmer on the liquids
    > surface as it simmers, even if that's a low boil i have turned the stock
    > down too after getting it going to a roiling boil in the beginning,
    > which i do because i start the meat stock in cold water and skim
    > assiduously as it comes to a BOIL and remains then at a BOIL for 10 - 20
    > minutes while i assiduously skim.


    The scum comes up even if you don't bring it to a boil, IME. You can
    skim all you want and end up with a clearer stock, because it didn't
    boil.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  17. #17
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question

    Ranée at Arabian Knits <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Who boils stock?


    I do, but it's vegetable stock.


    S.

  18. #18
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question

    Joseph Littleshoes wrote:

    > Its like broth and bouillon and soup, the are interchangeable terms in
    > American vernacular usage.


    I'm American and none of those terms are interchangeable to me <shrug>
    You left stock off the list too.

  19. #19
    Joseph Littleshoes Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question



    Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Joseph Littleshoes <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>And all that, from mere "kissing" of the liquid, a "shimmer" or other
    >>slight vibration of the cooking liquids surface area to a full blow
    >>"roiling boil" i prefer something above a mere simmer on the liquids
    >>surface as it simmers, even if that's a low boil i have turned the stock
    >>down too after getting it going to a roiling boil in the beginning,
    >>which i do because i start the meat stock in cold water and skim
    >>assiduously as it comes to a BOIL and remains then at a BOIL for 10 - 20
    >>minutes while i assiduously skim.

    >
    >
    > The scum comes up even if you don't bring it to a boil, IME. You can
    > skim all you want and end up with a clearer stock, because it didn't
    > boil.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ranee


    There are various substances that get thrown off the meat and bones at
    various temps. and some of which are water soluble and needs to be
    removed as soon as it rises to the surface, otherwise it gets reabsorbed
    back into the stock and is a contributing factor to a cloudy stock.
    --

    Mr. Joseph Paul Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.

    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  20. #20
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Stock Making Question

    On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 00:23:21 -0500, Goomba <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Joseph Littleshoes wrote:
    >
    >> Its like broth and bouillon and soup, the are interchangeable terms in
    >> American vernacular usage.

    >
    >I'm American and none of those terms are interchangeable to me <shrug>
    >You left stock off the list too.



    I was going to say that-- but most of us on r.f.c do not speak food
    'vernacular'. The masses rarely distinguish. [in my experience,
    anyway]

    And if soup belongs- I'd toss in stew.<g>

    Jim
    [and then there's the whole-- I don't care what you call it-- Does it
    taste good?]

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