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Thread: Stir fried Romaine

  1. #1
    aem Guest

    Default Stir fried Romaine

    Cooking for one the other night I had a little beef to slice but none
    of the usual veggie accompaniments. I did have some romaine. Romaine
    is a lettuce, but it has enough substance and taste to be treated like
    bok choy or Napa cabbage in a stirfry, with delicious results. What I
    did:

    Sliced the beef and marinated in mixture of soy, sherry, cornstarch
    and black pepper,
    Mixed soy sauce, sherry, sugar and salt, set aside.
    Smashed a large garlic clove and sliced a couple quarter-sized
    pieces of fresh ginger..
    Cut the romaine crosswise into about 1.5-inch pieces.

    Heated the small wok until beginning to smoke. Swirled in about 1
    TB oil, added the garlic and ginger and gave a couple of stirs until
    fragrance appeared. Put in the romaine and stirred until all coated
    with oil. Added the seasoning mixture. Removed while still crispy --
    total cooking time 2 minutes or less. Reheated wok and added beef,
    leaving as much marinade behind as possible, spreading beef out so it
    was all in one layer. Let sear on one side. Then stirred it up,
    added the romaine back along with its liquid and the remaining beef
    marinade. Stirred it until all hot. Done.

    Romaine is most often seen in a stirfry by itself, but it was fine
    with the beef. I think its slight bitterness makes it work better
    with beef than it would with chicken. Next time I might add a few
    drops of chili oil. -aem

  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Stir fried Romaine

    On Thu, 24 Jul 2008 11:16:09 -0700 (PDT), aem <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Romaine is most often seen in a stirfry by itself, but it was fine
    >with the beef. I think its slight bitterness makes it work better
    >with beef than it would with chicken. Next time I might add a few
    >drops of chili oil.


    I've never thought about stir frying romaine! Thanks for the idea.


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  3. #3
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Stir fried Romaine

    aem wrote:
    > Cooking for one the other night I had a little beef to slice but none
    > of the usual veggie accompaniments. I did have some romaine. Romaine
    > is a lettuce, but it has enough substance and taste to be treated like
    > bok choy or Napa cabbage in a stirfry, with delicious results. What I
    > did:
    >
    > Sliced the beef and marinated in mixture of soy, sherry, cornstarch
    > and black pepper,
    > Mixed soy sauce, sherry, sugar and salt, set aside.
    > Smashed a large garlic clove and sliced a couple quarter-sized
    > pieces of fresh ginger..
    > Cut the romaine crosswise into about 1.5-inch pieces.
    >
    > Heated the small wok until beginning to smoke. Swirled in about 1
    > TB oil, added the garlic and ginger and gave a couple of stirs until
    > fragrance appeared. Put in the romaine and stirred until all coated
    > with oil. Added the seasoning mixture. Removed while still crispy --
    > total cooking time 2 minutes or less. Reheated wok and added beef,
    > leaving as much marinade behind as possible, spreading beef out so it
    > was all in one layer. Let sear on one side. Then stirred it up,
    > added the romaine back along with its liquid and the remaining beef
    > marinade. Stirred it until all hot. Done.
    >
    > Romaine is most often seen in a stirfry by itself, but it was fine
    > with the beef. I think its slight bitterness makes it work better
    > with beef than it would with chicken. Next time I might add a few
    > drops of chili oil. -aem


    Good idea! I can imagine doing that with the romaine ribs....
    Maybe an oyster sauce treatment.

    --
    Jean B.

  4. #4
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: Stir fried Romaine


    <sf> wrote:

    > On Thu, 24 Jul 2008 11:16:09 -0700 (PDT), aem <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > Romaine is most often seen in a stirfry by itself, but it was fine
    > >with the beef. I think its slight bitterness makes it work better
    > >with beef than it would with chicken. Next time I might add a few
    > >drops of chili oil.

    >
    > I've never thought about stir frying romaine! Thanks for the idea.
    >



    Heads of romaine are often on sale but after dispensing with the hard "rib"
    of each leaf there is considerable waste. This sounds like a good way to
    utilize the whole schlmiel...

    I do a lotta stir - fry and I'll throw any lettuce (except for soft -
    leaved) I have in, iceberg is another good one...


    --
    Best
    Greg




  5. #5
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Stir fried Romaine

    Gregory Morrow wrote:
    > Jean B. wrote:
    >
    >> aem wrote:
    >>> Cooking for one the other night I had a little beef to slice but none
    >>> of the usual veggie accompaniments. I did have some romaine. Romaine
    >>> is a lettuce, but it has enough substance and taste to be treated like
    >>> bok choy or Napa cabbage in a stirfry, with delicious results. What I
    >>> did:
    >>>
    >>> Sliced the beef and marinated in mixture of soy, sherry, cornstarch
    >>> and black pepper,
    >>> Mixed soy sauce, sherry, sugar and salt, set aside.
    >>> Smashed a large garlic clove and sliced a couple quarter-sized
    >>> pieces of fresh ginger..
    >>> Cut the romaine crosswise into about 1.5-inch pieces.
    >>>
    >>> Heated the small wok until beginning to smoke. Swirled in about 1
    >>> TB oil, added the garlic and ginger and gave a couple of stirs until
    >>> fragrance appeared. Put in the romaine and stirred until all coated
    >>> with oil. Added the seasoning mixture. Removed while still crispy --
    >>> total cooking time 2 minutes or less. Reheated wok and added beef,
    >>> leaving as much marinade behind as possible, spreading beef out so it
    >>> was all in one layer. Let sear on one side. Then stirred it up,
    >>> added the romaine back along with its liquid and the remaining beef
    >>> marinade. Stirred it until all hot. Done.
    >>>
    >>> Romaine is most often seen in a stirfry by itself, but it was fine
    >>> with the beef. I think its slight bitterness makes it work better
    >>> with beef than it would with chicken. Next time I might add a few
    >>> drops of chili oil. -aem

    >> Good idea! I can imagine doing that with the romaine ribs....
    >> Maybe an oyster sauce treatment.

    >
    >
    > You must be pretty smart, I was thinking the exact same thing...
    >
    > :-)
    >
    >

    I noticed! I don't particularly care for lots of ribs in my salads.

    --
    Jean B.

  6. #6
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Stir fried Romaine

    On Jul 24, 11:53*am, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    >
    > Good idea! *I can imagine doing that with the romaine ribs....
    > Maybe an oyster sauce treatment.
    >

    Yes, I've added a touch of oyster sauce in the past. Not too much,
    though, as romaine's flavor isn't as strong as, say, gai lan (Chinese
    broccoli). -aem

  7. #7
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: Stir fried Romaine


    Jean B. wrote:

    > aem wrote:
    > > Cooking for one the other night I had a little beef to slice but none
    > > of the usual veggie accompaniments. I did have some romaine. Romaine
    > > is a lettuce, but it has enough substance and taste to be treated like
    > > bok choy or Napa cabbage in a stirfry, with delicious results. What I
    > > did:
    > >
    > > Sliced the beef and marinated in mixture of soy, sherry, cornstarch
    > > and black pepper,
    > > Mixed soy sauce, sherry, sugar and salt, set aside.
    > > Smashed a large garlic clove and sliced a couple quarter-sized
    > > pieces of fresh ginger..
    > > Cut the romaine crosswise into about 1.5-inch pieces.
    > >
    > > Heated the small wok until beginning to smoke. Swirled in about 1
    > > TB oil, added the garlic and ginger and gave a couple of stirs until
    > > fragrance appeared. Put in the romaine and stirred until all coated
    > > with oil. Added the seasoning mixture. Removed while still crispy --
    > > total cooking time 2 minutes or less. Reheated wok and added beef,
    > > leaving as much marinade behind as possible, spreading beef out so it
    > > was all in one layer. Let sear on one side. Then stirred it up,
    > > added the romaine back along with its liquid and the remaining beef
    > > marinade. Stirred it until all hot. Done.
    > >
    > > Romaine is most often seen in a stirfry by itself, but it was fine
    > > with the beef. I think its slight bitterness makes it work better
    > > with beef than it would with chicken. Next time I might add a few
    > > drops of chili oil. -aem

    >
    > Good idea! I can imagine doing that with the romaine ribs....
    > Maybe an oyster sauce treatment.



    You must be pretty smart, I was thinking the exact same thing...

    :-)


    --
    Best
    Greg




  8. #8
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Stir fried Romaine



    "Jean B." wrote:
    >
    > aem wrote:
    > > Cooking for one the other night I had a little beef to slice but none
    > > of the usual veggie accompaniments. I did have some romaine. Romaine
    > > is a lettuce, but it has enough substance and taste to be treated like
    > > bok choy or Napa cabbage in a stirfry, with delicious results. What I
    > > did:
    > >
    > > Sliced the beef and marinated in mixture of soy, sherry, cornstarch
    > > and black pepper,
    > > Mixed soy sauce, sherry, sugar and salt, set aside.
    > > Smashed a large garlic clove and sliced a couple quarter-sized
    > > pieces of fresh ginger..
    > > Cut the romaine crosswise into about 1.5-inch pieces.
    > >
    > > Heated the small wok until beginning to smoke. Swirled in about 1
    > > TB oil, added the garlic and ginger and gave a couple of stirs until
    > > fragrance appeared. Put in the romaine and stirred until all coated
    > > with oil. Added the seasoning mixture. Removed while still crispy --
    > > total cooking time 2 minutes or less. Reheated wok and added beef,
    > > leaving as much marinade behind as possible, spreading beef out so it
    > > was all in one layer. Let sear on one side. Then stirred it up,
    > > added the romaine back along with its liquid and the remaining beef
    > > marinade. Stirred it until all hot. Done.
    > >
    > > Romaine is most often seen in a stirfry by itself, but it was fine
    > > with the beef. I think its slight bitterness makes it work better
    > > with beef than it would with chicken. Next time I might add a few
    > > drops of chili oil. -aem

    >
    > Good idea! I can imagine doing that with the romaine ribs....
    > Maybe an oyster sauce treatment.
    >
    > --
    > Jean B.


    That's what we do. Assorted lettuce leaves, bok choi, napa etc. Stirfy,
    dress with a little oyster sauce, soy sauce and sesame oil. For added
    protein, bind with a couple of eggs and fry a bit longer.

  9. #9
    stark Guest

    Default Re: Stir fried Romaine

    On Jul 24, 1:56 pm, "Gregory Morrow" <moskaunachw...@interflugddr.os>
    wrote:
    > <sf> wrote:


    >
    > Heads of romaine are often on sale but after dispensing with the hard "rib"
    > of each leaf there is considerable waste. This sounds like a good way to
    > utilize the whole schlmiel...
    >


    Hmmmmm. I discard an inch of "rib" but use the rest in my salads,
    liking the substantial crunch, but then I don't have all my original
    teef. The ones I do have don't handle smaller bits of leafy greens or
    herbs very well. I've got to de-parsley after every meal lest I appear
    gat toofed.

  10. #10
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Stir fried Romaine

    Arri London wrote:
    >
    > "Jean B." wrote:
    >> aem wrote:
    >>> Cooking for one the other night I had a little beef to slice but none
    >>> of the usual veggie accompaniments. I did have some romaine. Romaine
    >>> is a lettuce, but it has enough substance and taste to be treated like
    >>> bok choy or Napa cabbage in a stirfry, with delicious results. What I
    >>> did:
    >>>
    >>> Sliced the beef and marinated in mixture of soy, sherry, cornstarch
    >>> and black pepper,
    >>> Mixed soy sauce, sherry, sugar and salt, set aside.
    >>> Smashed a large garlic clove and sliced a couple quarter-sized
    >>> pieces of fresh ginger..
    >>> Cut the romaine crosswise into about 1.5-inch pieces.
    >>>
    >>> Heated the small wok until beginning to smoke. Swirled in about 1
    >>> TB oil, added the garlic and ginger and gave a couple of stirs until
    >>> fragrance appeared. Put in the romaine and stirred until all coated
    >>> with oil. Added the seasoning mixture. Removed while still crispy --
    >>> total cooking time 2 minutes or less. Reheated wok and added beef,
    >>> leaving as much marinade behind as possible, spreading beef out so it
    >>> was all in one layer. Let sear on one side. Then stirred it up,
    >>> added the romaine back along with its liquid and the remaining beef
    >>> marinade. Stirred it until all hot. Done.
    >>>
    >>> Romaine is most often seen in a stirfry by itself, but it was fine
    >>> with the beef. I think its slight bitterness makes it work better
    >>> with beef than it would with chicken. Next time I might add a few
    >>> drops of chili oil. -aem

    >> Good idea! I can imagine doing that with the romaine ribs....
    >> Maybe an oyster sauce treatment.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Jean B.

    >
    > That's what we do. Assorted lettuce leaves, bok choi, napa etc. Stirfy,
    > dress with a little oyster sauce, soy sauce and sesame oil. For added
    > protein, bind with a couple of eggs and fry a bit longer.


    Well, some folks are just "quicker" than others. :-)

    --
    Jean B.

  11. #11
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Stir fried Romaine

    On Thu, 24 Jul 2008 11:16:09 -0700 (PDT), aem <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Cooking for one the other night I had a little beef to slice but none
    >of the usual veggie accompaniments. I did have some romaine. Romaine
    >is a lettuce, but it has enough substance and taste to be treated like
    >bok choy or Napa cabbage in a stirfry, with delicious results. What I
    >did:
    >
    > Sliced the beef and marinated in mixture of soy, sherry, cornstarch
    >and black pepper,
    > Mixed soy sauce, sherry, sugar and salt, set aside.
    > Smashed a large garlic clove and sliced a couple quarter-sized
    >pieces of fresh ginger..


    <process snipped>

    sounds like a good improv, aem.

    your pal,
    blake
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

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