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Thread: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

  1. #1
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    I need something to remove all those little grease splatters that stick like
    glue. I can't soak them since the surfaces are vertical. 409 works but you
    have to scrub until the grease softens up. Any gel like degreasers that can
    do the job and stick to the surface long enough to soften the grease? Maybe
    apply it with a paint roller?



  2. #2
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    On Sat, 15 Sep 2012 19:01:06 -0700, "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I need something to remove all those little grease splatters that stick like
    >glue. I can't soak them since the surfaces are vertical. 409 works but you
    >have to scrub until the grease softens up. Any gel like degreasers that can
    >do the job and stick to the surface long enough to soften the grease? Maybe
    >apply it with a paint roller?
    >

    scrape them with a plastic tool with sharp, beveled edge. A dough
    scraper, spatula, putty knife etc, then scrub.
    Janet

  3. #3
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it


    "Paul M. Cook" wrote:
    >
    > I need something to remove all those little grease splatters that stick like
    > glue. I can't soak them since the surfaces are vertical. 409 works but you
    > have to scrub until the grease softens up. Any gel like degreasers that can
    > do the job and stick to the surface long enough to soften the grease? Maybe
    > apply it with a paint roller?


    Soak a paper towel and then stick that on the vertical surface. Also be
    sure you don't use any cooking spray type stuff containing lecithin,
    that crap has to be sandblasted off.

  4. #4
    gregz Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I need something to remove all those little grease splatters that stick like
    > glue. I can't soak them since the surfaces are vertical. 409 works but you
    > have to scrub until the grease softens up. Any gel like degreasers that can
    > do the job and stick to the surface long enough to soften the grease? Maybe
    > apply it with a paint roller?


    There is a sticky removal gel. What's the surface?

    Try baby oil, citrus spray degreaser -actually leaves oily film, wd-40,
    heat with hair dryer, olive oil, etc. Etc.

    Greg

  5. #5
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    On Saturday, September 15, 2012 9:01:10 PM UTC-5, Paul M. Cook wrote:
    > I need something to remove all those little grease splatters that stick like
    >
    > glue. I can't soak them since the surfaces are vertical. 409 works but you
    >
    > have to scrub until the grease softens up. Any gel like degreasers that can
    >
    > do the job and stick to the surface long enough to soften the grease? Maybe
    >
    > apply it with a paint roller?


    Castrol Super Clean is really hardcore. There's also trisodium phosphate. The way you make a fully saturated TSP solution is to bring some water to low boil, then keep slowly adding TSP and stirring until you finally put ina spponful that will not dissolve in the simmering water. Then you add a little water and bring it to boil again, and if everything dissolves, you're done. If not, repeat with a bit more water. Then let it cool and you have a TSP super solute going on that will cut the **** out of grease. With either the Super Clean or TSP (and you can use them together), wear gloves,and make absolutely certain not to splash either into your eyes.

    Also, a razor scraper can be used on most surfaces if the blade is brand new and you are careful. http://ak.buy.com/PI/0/1000/226642064.jpg After wiping on the solution, give it a few minutes to soften things up, then use the scraper gently, with the blade as parallel to the surface as possible. You can also use Windex, which is far less nasty to work with, but doesn't work as well.

    I have wondered before whether lightly coating such surfaces with lecithin cooking spray (Pam) would make them easier to clean later.

    --Bryan

  6. #6
    z z Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    I just use those chlorox wipes seems to work well.


  7. #7
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    On Sep 15, 10:10*pm, angie-...@webtv.net (z z) wrote:
    >
    > I just use those chlorox wipes seems to work well.
    >
    >

    Passed over the original question I see.


  8. #8
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it


    "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:k33bt5$pmm$[email protected]..
    >I need something to remove all those little grease splatters that stick
    >like glue. I can't soak them since the surfaces are vertical. 409 works
    >but you have to scrub until the grease softens up. Any gel like degreasers
    >that can do the job and stick to the surface long enough to soften the
    >grease? Maybe apply it with a paint roller?


    Hmmm... Where are these? I have only ever had them on the wall at the back
    of the stove and really only a few little tiny ones. They just came right
    off.



  9. #9
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    [email protected] wrote:
    > On Sep 15, 10:10 pm, angie-...@webtv.net (z z) wrote:
    >>
    >> I just use those chlorox wipes seems to work well.
    >>
    >>

    > Passed over the original question I see.


    How? He asked how to clean them and was given an answer. I haven't had any
    trouble cleaning them with any cleaner I have used. Didn't have to scrub or
    anything but then I only ever had a tiny few.



  10. #10
    Polly Esther Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it


    "Pete C." <>
    > Soak a paper towel and then stick that on the vertical surface. Also be
    > sure you don't use any cooking spray type stuff containing lecithin,
    > that crap has to be sandblasted off.


    An ounce of prevention here. I've gotten terribly tacky about spraying
    non-stick onto my loved and wonderful waffle maker. FIRST I blue painter's
    tape a sheet of newspaper up on the back splash behind the waffle maker. It
    seemed like a good idea at the time and works pretty well but our kitchen
    'apt to be splashed' walls are covered in formica. Easy on the budget and
    easy to clean but sure does show the splatters. Taking down the newspaper
    after spraying only takes a second. Don't know what we'll do when all of
    our newspaper are only online. Polly


  11. #11
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    On Sep 15, 11:11*pm, "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote:
    >
    > itsjoannotjo...@webtv.net wrote:
    >
    > > On Sep 15, 10:10 pm, angie-...@webtv.net (z z) wrote:

    >
    > >> I just use those chlorox wipes seems to work well.

    >
    > > Passed over the original question I see.

    >
    > How? *He asked how to clean them and was given an answer. *I haven't had any
    > trouble cleaning them with any cleaner I have used. *Didn't have to scrub or
    > anything but then I only ever had a tiny few.
    >
    >

    Paul stated:

    I need something to remove all those little grease splatters that
    stick like
    glue. I can't soak them since the surfaces are vertical. 409 works
    but you
    have to scrub until the grease softens up. Any gel like degreasers
    that can
    do the job and stick to the surface long enough to soften the grease?
    Maybe
    apply it with a paint roller?

    What did you miss? Evidently his grease splatters are worse/different
    than yours and he said he has to scrub even with 409 cleaner.


  12. #12
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Sep 15, 11:11 pm, "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote:
    >
    > itsjoannotjo...@webtv.net wrote:
    >
    > > On Sep 15, 10:10 pm, angie-...@webtv.net (z z) wrote:

    >
    > >> I just use those chlorox wipes seems to work well.

    >
    > > Passed over the original question I see.

    >
    > How? He asked how to clean them and was given an answer. I haven't had any
    > trouble cleaning them with any cleaner I have used. Didn't have to scrub
    > or
    > anything but then I only ever had a tiny few.
    >
    >

    Paul stated:

    I need something to remove all those little grease splatters that
    stick like
    glue. I can't soak them since the surfaces are vertical. 409 works
    but you
    have to scrub until the grease softens up. Any gel like degreasers
    that can
    do the job and stick to the surface long enough to soften the grease?
    Maybe
    apply it with a paint roller?

    What did you miss? Evidently his grease splatters are worse/different
    than yours and he said he has to scrub even with 409 cleaner.



    Yes. I have been not in the best of health for the last couple of months.
    I noticed with he flouro lights on that the grease spatters are pretty
    extensive and gnarly. I need to do some heavy duty cleaning. This stuff is
    tenacious.

    Paul



  13. #13
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    [email protected] wrote:
    > On Sep 15, 11:11 pm, "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> itsjoannotjo...@webtv.net wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Sep 15, 10:10 pm, angie-...@webtv.net (z z) wrote:

    >>
    >>>> I just use those chlorox wipes seems to work well.

    >>
    >>> Passed over the original question I see.

    >>
    >> How? He asked how to clean them and was given an answer. I haven't
    >> had any trouble cleaning them with any cleaner I have used. Didn't
    >> have to scrub or anything but then I only ever had a tiny few.
    >>
    >>

    > Paul stated:
    >
    > I need something to remove all those little grease splatters that
    > stick like
    > glue. I can't soak them since the surfaces are vertical. 409 works
    > but you
    > have to scrub until the grease softens up. Any gel like degreasers
    > that can
    > do the job and stick to the surface long enough to soften the grease?
    > Maybe
    > apply it with a paint roller?
    >
    > What did you miss? Evidently his grease splatters are worse/different
    > than yours and he said he has to scrub even with 409 cleaner.


    I didn't miss a thing! The person replying said that the Chlorox wipes work
    for them. I don't use 409. I don't use Chlorox wipes so I am unfamiliar
    with either of those products.



  14. #14
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    "[email protected]" wrote:
    >
    > On Sep 15, 11:11 pm, "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote:


    > > How? He asked how to clean them and was given an answer. I haven't had any
    > > trouble cleaning them with any cleaner I have used. Didn't have to scrub or
    > > anything but then I only ever had a tiny few.
    > >
    > >

    > Paul stated:
    >
    > I need something to remove all those little grease splatters that
    > stick like
    > glue. I can't soak them since the surfaces are vertical. 409 works
    > but you
    > have to scrub until the grease softens up. Any gel like degreasers
    > that can
    > do the job and stick to the surface long enough to soften the grease?
    > Maybe
    > apply it with a paint roller?
    >
    > What did you miss? Evidently his grease splatters are worse/different
    > than yours and he said he has to scrub even with 409 cleaner.


    Sounds to me like Julie probably cleans up the grease splatters fairly often
    (I'm remembering the "white glove" inspections she had to deal with) so
    naturally they will wipe off easy.

    I suspect Paul, the OP, is talking about long term accumulations of the
    grease splatters. My stove is in a corner and the walls there are ceramic
    tile. I'm a no-cleaning "pig" and often will wait until it's gets pretty
    annoying to look at before I clean them. By that time, even industrial
    strength concentrated 409 won't clean them easily. What I end up using is a
    green scrubby pad or even Brillo pads plus some Ajax. I scour them then wipe
    them off with a damp washcloth, rinsed frequently.

    Never tried this yet at home but I do have a degreaser in my truck that I
    use to wipe down kitchens before painting. Wil-Bond, sold at paint stores.
    It melts grease off immediately BUT:

    1) it destroys a paint finish...use on painted surfaces only if you plan to
    repaint
    2) the highly toxic fumes will run most people right out of the house
    3) those fumes are also highly flammable

    I use a respirator whenever I use this at work.
    I might just try this next time at home because if *anything* will melt that
    stuff right off, this product would do it.

    If I do, I'll open all windows and will have to temporarily blow out the 3
    pilot lights on my gas stove. No way would I use this stuff around lit pilot
    lights. I'm sure it's also full of cancer causing chemicals. I'll try it
    but I'm not suggesting anyone else do...it's an extreme solution for a
    cleaning problem. Best to use the scrubby/brillo pads with Ajax and some
    "elbow grease."

    G.

  15. #15
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it


    "Gary" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    > "[email protected]" wrote:
    >>
    >> On Sep 15, 11:11 pm, "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote:

    >
    >> > How? He asked how to clean them and was given an answer. I haven't
    >> > had any
    >> > trouble cleaning them with any cleaner I have used. Didn't have to
    >> > scrub or
    >> > anything but then I only ever had a tiny few.
    >> >
    >> >

    >> Paul stated:
    >>
    >> I need something to remove all those little grease splatters that
    >> stick like
    >> glue. I can't soak them since the surfaces are vertical. 409 works
    >> but you
    >> have to scrub until the grease softens up. Any gel like degreasers
    >> that can
    >> do the job and stick to the surface long enough to soften the grease?
    >> Maybe
    >> apply it with a paint roller?
    >>
    >> What did you miss? Evidently his grease splatters are worse/different
    >> than yours and he said he has to scrub even with 409 cleaner.

    >
    > Sounds to me like Julie probably cleans up the grease splatters fairly
    > often
    > (I'm remembering the "white glove" inspections she had to deal with) so
    > naturally they will wipe off easy.


    Not really because honestly I don't get them much at all. I don't use a lot
    of oil in my cooking. I never deep fry. And the only bacon I buy now is
    the pre-cooked kind that I just heat in the microwave.

    I did have the bad habit of frequently cleaning my range hood though,
    perhaps just because it is so visible. And then I noticed that the finish
    had gone all funny. Well... I had cleaned it to the point where the paint
    was coming off! Next in line after the new roof and the electrical problems
    getting fixed is a range hood. The kind we have is a suckish one anyway.
    It's not vented to the outside. It's just more like a filter thing. Not
    even sure that you can get filters for it any more. But it isn't working
    now anyway due to the electrical problem.
    >
    > I suspect Paul, the OP, is talking about long term accumulations of the
    > grease splatters. My stove is in a corner and the walls there are ceramic
    > tile. I'm a no-cleaning "pig" and often will wait until it's gets pretty
    > annoying to look at before I clean them. By that time, even industrial
    > strength concentrated 409 won't clean them easily. What I end up using is
    > a
    > green scrubby pad or even Brillo pads plus some Ajax. I scour them then
    > wipe
    > them off with a damp washcloth, rinsed frequently.


    That could be. One thing that I used to notice in my mom's kitchen would
    drive me up the wall. She was given a spice rack as s wedding present. It
    contained whatever brand of spice had the pale bluish green lids on them.
    Those might not have been the original spices in there but that is what she
    had in the rack. And she never used the danged things. The few seasonings
    that she did use were tucked away in the cupboard. The spice rack sat on
    the back of the stove. Not only did those spice bottles have that greasy
    coating all over them, but there was dust stuck in it. I would be like...
    Can't you SEE that? Ew.

    Now I do know that I do have some of that greasy/dusty coating on some
    things in my kitchen. I have some things that are up high, on top of my
    cupboards. Some of them came with the house. I stuck a few things up
    there. Mainly decorative things that I never or rarely use. Like my bean
    pot. They will get icky and from time to time I do take them down. The
    washable stuff gets a good scrubbing with dish soap and a brush. The
    baskets get dusted or if in a bad enough state, tossed and maybe replaced.
    However, that stuff is up so high that you can't really tell if it is cruddy
    or not. Unless you actually go up there and touch it. Which I rarely ever
    do.
    >
    > Never tried this yet at home but I do have a degreaser in my truck that I
    > use to wipe down kitchens before painting. Wil-Bond, sold at paint stores.
    > It melts grease off immediately BUT:
    >
    > 1) it destroys a paint finish...use on painted surfaces only if you plan
    > to
    > repaint
    > 2) the highly toxic fumes will run most people right out of the house
    > 3) those fumes are also highly flammable
    >
    > I use a respirator whenever I use this at work.
    > I might just try this next time at home because if *anything* will melt
    > that
    > stuff right off, this product would do it.
    >
    > If I do, I'll open all windows and will have to temporarily blow out the 3
    > pilot lights on my gas stove. No way would I use this stuff around lit
    > pilot
    > lights. I'm sure it's also full of cancer causing chemicals. I'll try it
    > but I'm not suggesting anyone else do...it's an extreme solution for a
    > cleaning problem. Best to use the scrubby/brillo pads with Ajax and some
    > "elbow grease."


    I had some gel Goo Gone which apparently was very old. Because I had read
    that someone used it to degunk a non-stick pan, I tried to use it on my
    Circulon that is now in the trash. The stuff would not spray out of there
    at all. So I opened the bottle and dumped it into the pan. That's when I
    noticed how clumpy it was. It was horrible! And oh the stench! I had
    forgotten how bad that stuff smelled. That went right into the garbage as
    well.



  16. #16
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    On 2012-09-16, Paul M. Cook <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I need something to remove all those little grease splatters that stick like
    > glue. I can't soak them since the surfaces are vertical. 409 works but you
    > have to scrub until the grease softens up. Any gel like degreasers that can
    > do the job and stick to the surface long enough to soften the grease? Maybe
    > apply it with a paint roller?


    If the surface is glass, stainless steel, enamaled steel, or even some
    kinds of plastic (try a test patch), use oven cleaner. If there is
    any aluminum, DON'T use oven cleaner! It will etch/disolve alum. Mom
    hadn't cleaned her stove since god wore knee pants. The gnarly gummy
    splatter on the stove's glass back panel was dang near permanent.
    Oven cleaner to the rescue. As a bonus, the foamy kind in a spray can
    will hang pretty good on a vertical surface. Pay the extra $$$ for a
    good brand like Easy-Off. You can find cheapo stuff from the dollar
    store, but you'll use 3X as much.

    Also works excellent for highly polished SS cookware. Oven cleaner
    gets rid of the crud with zero damage to the polished surface.

    nb

    --
    Definition of objectivism:
    "Eff you! I got mine."
    http://www.nongmoproject.org/

  17. #17
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    notbob wrote:
    >


    > If the surface is glass, stainless steel, enamaled steel, or even some
    > kinds of plastic (try a test patch), use oven cleaner. If there is
    > any aluminum, DON'T use oven cleaner! It will etch/disolve alum. Mom
    > hadn't cleaned her stove since god wore knee pants. The gnarly gummy
    > splatter on the stove's glass back panel was dang near permanent.
    > Oven cleaner to the rescue. As a bonus, the foamy kind in a spray can
    > will hang pretty good on a vertical surface. Pay the extra $$$ for a
    > good brand like Easy-Off. You can find cheapo stuff from the dollar
    > store, but you'll use 3X as much.
    >
    > Also works excellent for highly polished SS cookware. Oven cleaner
    > gets rid of the crud with zero damage to the polished surface.


    Good idea. Would that be safe to use on a porcelin stove top? I've only used
    it for cleaning oven and it works like a wonder there. It would probably
    work (and be safe) for my ceramic tiles around stove too.

    That said, in a previous post this morning I talked about a strong degreaser
    that I use for work sometimes. Wil-Bond. I never thought to try it on my
    kitchen stove tiles. Well DUH GARY! I just put a small amount on a rag and
    test tried it on a few tiles. This is the miracle stuff that the OP was
    hoping to find. Just a few wipes and my few tiles were perfectly clean from
    old accumulated splatters.

    I'll finish cleaning today, with windows open and pilot lights out. I can't
    believe I never thought to try this before especially since I use it to
    remove grease from customers kitchens before painting. All that wasted time
    I've spent in the past using Ajax and scrubby pads. (sigh)

    Again I will say though.....Don't try this at home boys and girls unless you
    take full precautions. My ceramic tiles are safe from this strong stuff but
    I wouldn't dare try to clean my stovetop with it...or any painted surfaces.
    Also the strong/dangerous fumes which are highly combustible and not so good
    for your lungs either.

    G.

  18. #18
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    On Sat, 15 Sep 2012 19:57:35 -0700 (PDT), Bryan
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    ....
    >I have wondered before whether lightly coating such surfaces with lecithin cooking spray (Pam) would make them easier to clean later.
    >
    >--Bryan


    Uh, yeah, good luck with that! Pam is just spray oil! You'd be laying
    down a thin layer of exactly what you're trying to make easier to
    clean off!

    John Kuthe...

  19. #19
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    On 16/09/2012 12:15 AM, Polly Esther wrote:
    >
    > An ounce of prevention here. I've gotten terribly tacky about
    > spraying non-stick onto my loved and wonderful waffle maker. FIRST I
    > blue painter's tape a sheet of newspaper up on the back splash behind
    > the waffle maker. It seemed like a good idea at the time and works
    > pretty well but our kitchen 'apt to be splashed' walls are covered in
    > formica. Easy on the budget and easy to clean but sure does show the
    > splatters. Taking down the newspaper after spraying only takes a
    > second. Don't know what we'll do when all of our newspaper are only
    > online. Polly



    Out of curiosity, why would you tape it. If it is there to prevent the
    over spray you could simply fold the newspaper open and lean the upper
    portion on the wall.


  20. #20
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    On 9/16/2012 3:05 AM, Paul M. Cook wrote:

    > Yes. I have been not in the best of health for the last couple of months.


    I'm very sorry to hear that and I hope you get better soon.

    nancy


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