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Thread: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

  1. #21
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    John Kuthe wrote:
    >
    > On Sat, 15 Sep 2012 19:57:35 -0700 (PDT), Bryan
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > ...
    > >I have wondered before whether lightly coating such surfaces with lecithin cooking spray (Pam) would make them easier to clean later.
    > >
    > >--Bryan

    >
    > Uh, yeah, good luck with that! Pam is just spray oil! You'd be laying
    > down a thin layer of exactly what you're trying to make easier to
    > clean off!
    >
    > John Kuthe...


    Agree! :-)

    G.

  2. #22
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    Dave Smith wrote:
    >
    > On 16/09/2012 12:15 AM, Polly Esther wrote:
    > >
    > > An ounce of prevention here. I've gotten terribly tacky about
    > > spraying non-stick onto my loved and wonderful waffle maker. FIRST I
    > > blue painter's tape a sheet of newspaper up on the back splash behind
    > > the waffle maker. It seemed like a good idea at the time and works
    > > pretty well but our kitchen 'apt to be splashed' walls are covered in
    > > formica. Easy on the budget and easy to clean but sure does show the
    > > splatters. Taking down the newspaper after spraying only takes a
    > > second. Don't know what we'll do when all of our newspaper are only
    > > online. Polly

    >
    > Out of curiosity, why would you tape it. If it is there to prevent the
    > over spray you could simply fold the newspaper open and lean the upper
    > portion on the wall.


    You are correct. That would be an easier method. i've never liked the spray
    oil for that overspray reason though.

    Anyway, when the newspapers all go to online, she can just blue tape a
    flatscreen monitor to her back wall. heheheh

    G.

  3. #23
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    Nancy Young wrote:
    >
    > On 9/16/2012 3:05 AM, Paul M. Cook wrote:
    >
    > > Yes. I have been not in the best of health for the last couple of months.

    >
    > I'm very sorry to hear that and I hope you get better soon.
    >
    > nancy


    And CLEAN YOUR DAMN STOVE AREA TOO, YOU SLACKER!!

    G.

  4. #24
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    On Sep 15, 7:01*pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    > I need something to remove all those little grease splatters that stick like
    > glue. *I can't soak them since the surfaces are vertical. *409 works but you
    > have to scrub until the grease softens up. *Any gel like degreasers that can
    > do the job and stick to the surface long enough to soften the grease? *Maybe
    > apply it with a paint roller?


    If you have or have access to a steam cleaner, that works
    exceptionally well. We used a steamer in the restaurant to clean
    grease spatters on pretty much any surface. Works on cleaning ovens
    as well. The steam melts the grease and makes it easy to wipe up.

  5. #25
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    Paul M. Cook wrote:
    >
    >I need something to remove all those little grease splatters that stick like
    >glue. I can't soak them since the surfaces are vertical. 409 works but you
    >have to scrub until the grease softens up. Any gel like degreasers that can
    >do the job and stick to the surface long enough to soften the grease? Maybe
    >apply it with a paint roller?


    You need to say what the surface actually is (painted, plastic, wood,
    metal, etc.) and what kind of grease... a vertical surface can be a
    bathroom wall, the sides of an automobile, the sides of a cook pot...
    You don't give enough information for anyone to offer more than wild
    speculation... for all we know you're referring to Bwrrrryan's greasy
    ass.

  6. #26
    z z Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    Dad always screwed a panel of thin plexiglass to the wall behind the
    stove and replaced it every so often. My stove has a wall to the left
    wall in back and fridge to the right. Once every 6mos of so I use the
    chlorox wipes to clear off the hard bumps of grease dotting the
    surfaces. Works just fine. If one bump is resistive my thumbnail plus
    chlorox wipe seems to do the trick.

    Julie-don't try to tangle with Joanne-she is a bitterly unhappy woman
    who stalks people thru discussion groups-best to just ignore her. Her
    posts you notice provided no ideas for cleaning.


  7. #27
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    angie@WEBTV (z z) wrote:
    >
    >Dad always screwed a panel of thin plexiglass to the wall behind the
    >stove and replaced it every so often. My stove has a wall to the left
    >wall in back and fridge to the right. Once every 6mos of so I use the
    >chlorox wipes to clear off the hard bumps of grease dotting the
    >surfaces. Works just fine. If one bump is resistive my thumbnail plus
    >chlorox wipe seems to do the trick.
    >
    >Julie-don't try to tangle with Joanne-she is a bitterly unhappy woman
    >who stalks people thru discussion groups-best to just ignore her. Her
    >posts you notice provided no ideas for cleaning.


    What a lotta crap you dumbest of assholes... when one knows how to
    cook there is NO spatter on walls.

  8. #28
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    > angie@WEBTV (z z) wrote:
    > >
    > >Dad always screwed a panel of thin plexiglass to the wall behind the
    > >stove and replaced it every so often. My stove has a wall to the left
    > >wall in back and fridge to the right. Once every 6mos of so I use the
    > >chlorox wipes to clear off the hard bumps of grease dotting the
    > >surfaces. Works just fine. If one bump is resistive my thumbnail plus
    > >chlorox wipe seems to do the trick.
    > >
    > >Julie-don't try to tangle with Joanne-she is a bitterly unhappy woman
    > >who stalks people thru discussion groups-best to just ignore her. Her
    > >posts you notice provided no ideas for cleaning.

    >
    > What a lotta crap you dumbest of assholes... when one knows how to
    > cook there is NO spatter on walls.


    And there proves your old comment that most people here don't really cook.
    Maybe YOU being the first in line other than simmering 16 quarts of soup.

    If you've never had a grease/oil splatter around your stove, you've NEVER
    fried anything on your stove....ever! Claim all you want but your comment
    is a joke and only you might believe that. In real life though, even YOU
    know better.

    G.

  9. #29
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    Gary <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >>
    >> angie@WEBTV (z z) wrote:
    >> >
    >> >Dad always screwed a panel of thin plexiglass to the wall behind the
    >> >stove and replaced it every so often. My stove has a wall to the left
    >> >wall in back and fridge to the right. Once every 6mos of so I use the
    >> >chlorox wipes to clear off the hard bumps of grease dotting the
    >> >surfaces. Works just fine. If one bump is resistive my thumbnail plus
    >> >chlorox wipe seems to do the trick.
    >> >
    >> >Julie-don't try to tangle with Joanne-she is a bitterly unhappy woman
    >> >who stalks people thru discussion groups-best to just ignore her. Her
    >> >posts you notice provided no ideas for cleaning.

    >>
    >> What a lotta crap you dumbest of assholes... when one knows how to
    >> cook there is NO spatter on walls.

    >
    >And there proves your old comment that most people here don't really cook.
    >Maybe YOU being the first in line other than simmering 16 quarts of soup.
    >
    >If you've never had a grease/oil splatter around your stove, you've NEVER
    >fried anything on your stove....ever! Claim all you want but your comment
    >is a joke and only you might believe that. In real life though, even YOU
    >know better.
    >
    >G.


    If you knew how to cook you'd fry in pans with high sides, no stove
    top spatter. I mostly fry in a braizer with 4" high sides. I hate
    uneccesary clean ups. My oven has a self clean feature yet in over
    fifteen years I used it once, not because I needed to but because I
    was curious if the feature worked. Used correctly an oven should
    rarely if ever need cleaning. When roasting use a deep roasting pan
    but elevate the meat with a high rack, spatter is from the dripping in
    the pan, not from the meat... a deep pan will prevent having a dirty
    oven, in all my years I've never had anything bake over, choose the
    correct sized pan, if not sure go larger. Folks who can't cook have
    no clue what cookware to use... they own those silly toys r us 7" fry
    pans, of course they spatter everywhere... no one should own a fry pan
    less than 12". And the best cooks are those who cook with the lowest
    temperatures... unfortunately most cook like men who are all done in
    under two minutes. I'm absolutely positive that Gary has never cooked
    anything, not even once (take-out & tv dinners is not cooking).

  10. #30
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    > And the best cooks are those who cook with the lowest
    > temperatures... unfortunately most cook like men who are all done in
    > under two minutes.


    LOL! So you've never seared meat on very hot before finishing on low. Never
    fried bacon? Never deep fried in a small saucepan? Again, if you never get
    splatters around your stove, you've either never cooked much or you are
    lying. It's ok to make a mess, Sheldon. Some cooking does that sometimes.


    > I'm absolutely positive that Gary has never cooked
    > anything, not even once (take-out & tv dinners is not cooking).


    Again....funny. I do often microwave tv dinners, etc, as it's very
    convenient after long work days. But I also do real cooking and my wall
    around stove (with many old splatters proves it).

    Thank you, try again. :-D

    G.

  11. #31
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    Gary wrote:

    > > And the best cooks are those who cook with the lowest
    > > temperatures... unfortunately most cook like men who are all done in
    > > under two minutes.

    >
    > LOL! So you've never seared meat on very hot before finishing on low. Never
    > fried bacon? Never deep fried in a small saucepan? Again, if you never get
    > splatters around your stove, you've either never cooked much or you are
    > lying. It's ok to make a mess, Sheldon. Some cooking does that sometimes.


    Shelley is puffing up with self-love because you took him seriously.



  12. #32
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    On Saturday, September 15, 2012 10:01:10 PM UTC-4, Paul M. Cook wrote:
    > I need something to remove all those little grease splatters that stick like
    >
    > glue.


    Gee, are we tawkin' about bacon grease spattering onto a stovetop from a skillet? I just take a soapy dishrag after doing the dishes and give the stove, backsplash etc a good swipe. NOW if we're tawkin' oven sides etc, that's another story.

    It almost sounds like you're lettin' the stuff sit for days or weeks, and then trying to attack the dried out buildup. NOW you need a dull knife, time and elbow grease.

    MY big beef in the kitchen lately is dh's store bought onion rolls. He toasts the rolls, and some of those black onion bits fall onto the floor. By next mawnin', they've been trod upon, become hard and are adhering like glue. No floor mop will touch 'em,-- only my fingernail or a dull knife. Grrrr. I guess I need to add an onion cleanup to my evening regimen.


  13. #33
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    On Sep 16, 11:25*am, angie-...@webtv.net (z z) wrote:
    >
    > Dad always screwed a panel of thin plexiglass to the wall behind the
    > stove and replaced it every so often. My stove has a wall to the left
    > wall in back and fridge to the right. Once every 6mos of so I use the
    > chlorox wipes to clear off the hard bumps of grease dotting the
    > surfaces. Works just fine. If one bump is resistive my thumbnail plus
    > chlorox wipe seems to do the trick.
    >
    > Julie-don't try to tangle with Joanne-she is a bitterly unhappy woman
    > who stalks people thru discussion groups-best to just ignore her. Her
    > posts you notice provided no ideas for cleaning.
    >
    >

    And neither did you you retarded asshole, there's not much spattering
    going on in your kitchen since all your meals are consumed from
    vending machines. How's the 'wonton class' coming along? And your
    reading comprehension is about as high as your I.Q.


  14. #34
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    On 9/16/2012 4:38 AM, Gary wrote:
    > If I do, I'll open all windows and will have to temporarily blow out the 3
    > pilot lights on my gas stove. No way would I use this stuff around lit pilot
    > lights. I'm sure it's also full of cancer causing chemicals. I'll try it
    > but I'm not suggesting anyone else do...it's an extreme solution for a
    > cleaning problem. Best to use the scrubby/brillo pads with Ajax and some
    > "elbow grease."


    and keep the little furries far away until well after the smell
    dissipates because they can be sensitive to anything caustic long after
    we can smell it.


  15. #35
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it


    "Brooklyn1" <Gravesend1> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > angie@WEBTV (z z) wrote:
    >>
    >>Dad always screwed a panel of thin plexiglass to the wall behind the
    >>stove and replaced it every so often. My stove has a wall to the left
    >>wall in back and fridge to the right. Once every 6mos of so I use the
    >>chlorox wipes to clear off the hard bumps of grease dotting the
    >>surfaces. Works just fine. If one bump is resistive my thumbnail plus
    >>chlorox wipe seems to do the trick.
    >>
    >>Julie-don't try to tangle with Joanne-she is a bitterly unhappy woman
    >>who stalks people thru discussion groups-best to just ignore her. Her
    >>posts you notice provided no ideas for cleaning.

    >
    > What a lotta crap you dumbest of assholes... when one knows how to
    > cook there is NO spatter on walls.


    I suppose it would depend on what you are cooking. For me, I think bacon
    was one of the worst offenders. Back when I did cook it in a pan, I
    actually had a spatter guard for the pan which in and of itself was a PITA
    but it greatly helped. I would think that greasy sausages would be bad too.
    I rarely ever cook those. And really I don't cook a lot of meat and never
    have, having been a vegetarian for a great many years.

    I don't have much trouble with the inside of my oven now either after giving
    up almost all broiling. I know people who broil most of their meats and if
    they do it in the oven, they have an oven that is a mess. I just found
    other ways to cook meat and nobody here has complained that they didn't get
    broiled meat. My mom and some other people I know have taken to broiling in
    their toaster ovens because they are smaller and I guess easier to clean. I
    have no toaster oven and haven't for many years. Just no place to put one.

    Probably my worst potential kitchen mess would be tomato based sauces. If I
    walk away from the stove to do something else, they can start to splatter.
    And they can splatter quite far. I have learned to hover over the pan just
    until the sauce comes to a boil and to immediately turn the heat down to low
    and/or slap a lid on the pan. Yes, I could just start out with a lid on the
    pan but then there is a chance that it could boil for too long and burn at
    the bottom of the pan.



  16. #36
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it


    "Gary" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    > Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >>
    >> angie@WEBTV (z z) wrote:
    >> >
    >> >Dad always screwed a panel of thin plexiglass to the wall behind the
    >> >stove and replaced it every so often. My stove has a wall to the left
    >> >wall in back and fridge to the right. Once every 6mos of so I use the
    >> >chlorox wipes to clear off the hard bumps of grease dotting the
    >> >surfaces. Works just fine. If one bump is resistive my thumbnail plus
    >> >chlorox wipe seems to do the trick.
    >> >
    >> >Julie-don't try to tangle with Joanne-she is a bitterly unhappy woman
    >> >who stalks people thru discussion groups-best to just ignore her. Her
    >> >posts you notice provided no ideas for cleaning.

    >>
    >> What a lotta crap you dumbest of assholes... when one knows how to
    >> cook there is NO spatter on walls.

    >
    > And there proves your old comment that most people here don't really cook.
    > Maybe YOU being the first in line other than simmering 16 quarts of soup.
    >
    > If you've never had a grease/oil splatter around your stove, you've NEVER
    > fried anything on your stove....ever! Claim all you want but your
    > comment
    > is a joke and only you might believe that. In real life though, even YOU
    > know better.
    >
    > G.


    I have fried things and didn't always get a splatter. But sometimes I did.
    These days I just don't fry things. I can get fried food in a restaurant.
    If I want it. I don't eat much fried stuff.



  17. #37
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it


    "Brooklyn1" <Gravesend1> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Gary <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >>>
    >>> angie@WEBTV (z z) wrote:
    >>> >
    >>> >Dad always screwed a panel of thin plexiglass to the wall behind the
    >>> >stove and replaced it every so often. My stove has a wall to the left
    >>> >wall in back and fridge to the right. Once every 6mos of so I use the
    >>> >chlorox wipes to clear off the hard bumps of grease dotting the
    >>> >surfaces. Works just fine. If one bump is resistive my thumbnail plus
    >>> >chlorox wipe seems to do the trick.
    >>> >
    >>> >Julie-don't try to tangle with Joanne-she is a bitterly unhappy woman
    >>> >who stalks people thru discussion groups-best to just ignore her. Her
    >>> >posts you notice provided no ideas for cleaning.
    >>>
    >>> What a lotta crap you dumbest of assholes... when one knows how to
    >>> cook there is NO spatter on walls.

    >>
    >>And there proves your old comment that most people here don't really cook.
    >>Maybe YOU being the first in line other than simmering 16 quarts of soup.
    >>
    >>If you've never had a grease/oil splatter around your stove, you've NEVER
    >>fried anything on your stove....ever! Claim all you want but your
    >>comment
    >>is a joke and only you might believe that. In real life though, even YOU
    >>know better.
    >>
    >>G.

    >
    > If you knew how to cook you'd fry in pans with high sides, no stove
    > top spatter. I mostly fry in a braizer with 4" high sides. I hate
    > uneccesary clean ups. My oven has a self clean feature yet in over
    > fifteen years I used it once, not because I needed to but because I
    > was curious if the feature worked. Used correctly an oven should
    > rarely if ever need cleaning. When roasting use a deep roasting pan
    > but elevate the meat with a high rack, spatter is from the dripping in
    > the pan, not from the meat... a deep pan will prevent having a dirty
    > oven, in all my years I've never had anything bake over, choose the
    > correct sized pan, if not sure go larger. Folks who can't cook have
    > no clue what cookware to use... they own those silly toys r us 7" fry
    > pans, of course they spatter everywhere... no one should own a fry pan
    > less than 12". And the best cooks are those who cook with the lowest
    > temperatures... unfortunately most cook like men who are all done in
    > under two minutes. I'm absolutely positive that Gary has never cooked
    > anything, not even once (take-out & tv dinners is not cooking).


    When I got my first apartment, my parents got me a little skillet for one
    and a little griddle for one. Those things were a joke! My roommate
    received an electric skillet for one which was an even bigger joke because
    he was 6' 4" and had a seemingly unlimited appetite. He was amazingly slim
    for a person who ate that much. There is no way he would have eaten a
    single egg, hamburger patty or pancake. So those things never got used.

    When we did cook, we almost always cooked for the two of us or more since we
    usually had friends over for dinner.

    Back before we had microwaves I could see the purpose of some small things.
    For instance a small pan for melting butter, perhaps for popcorn. But these
    days at least in my house, I just use a custard cup and the microwave.

    I find that my smaller pans actually get little to no use these days. I
    just keep using the same 3-4 pans over and over. If the pan is too large,
    it usually doesn't even matter.



  18. #38
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it


    "Gary" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    > Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >>
    >> And the best cooks are those who cook with the lowest
    >> temperatures... unfortunately most cook like men who are all done in
    >> under two minutes.

    >
    > LOL! So you've never seared meat on very hot before finishing on low.
    > Never
    > fried bacon? Never deep fried in a small saucepan? Again, if you never get
    > splatters around your stove, you've either never cooked much or you are
    > lying. It's ok to make a mess, Sheldon. Some cooking does that sometimes.


    I've seared meat. Might get a few splatters onto the stove which I just
    clean up when I am done. But it doesn't splatter on the wall, perhaps
    because I use the front burners.

    Cooking bacon was something that I loathed, not only because of the
    splatters but because you then have to deal with the grease. Now I just buy
    the stuff that is cooked from Costco and heat it in the microwave between
    paper towels. We like it. And it works for most things. Yes, once in a
    while I will buy something different like thick cut or peppered but I
    usually just buy this for a specific recipe and then I will cut it in small
    pieces and cook just enough for the recipe at a time so the amount of grease
    put off is lessened. If it did splatter, I would not just leave it. I
    would clean it right then.

    >> I'm absolutely positive that Gary has never cooked
    >> anything, not even once (take-out & tv dinners is not cooking).

    >
    > Again....funny. I do often microwave tv dinners, etc, as it's very
    > convenient after long work days. But I also do real cooking and my wall
    > around stove (with many old splatters proves it).
    >
    > Thank you, try again. :-D
    >
    > G.




  19. #39
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    angie@WEBTV (z z) wrote:
    >
    >Dad always screwed a panel of thin plexiglass.


    Your dad was stupid, he could have screwed momma.

  20. #40
    gregz Guest

    Default Re: Sticky, dried grease and how to clean it

    Gary <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >>
    >> And the best cooks are those who cook with the lowest
    >> temperatures... unfortunately most cook like men who are all done in
    >> under two minutes.

    >
    > LOL! So you've never seared meat on very hot before finishing on low. Never
    > fried bacon? Never deep fried in a small saucepan? Again, if you never get
    > splatters around your stove, you've either never cooked much or you are
    > lying. It's ok to make a mess, Sheldon. Some cooking does that sometimes.
    >
    >


    I just learned how to cook bacon on lower temps. Practically no splatter,
    and better cooked.

    >> I'm absolutely positive that Gary has never cooked
    >> anything, not even once (take-out & tv dinners is not cooking).

    >
    > Again....funny. I do often microwave tv dinners, etc, as it's very
    > convenient after long work days. But I also do real cooking and my wall
    > around stove (with many old splatters proves it).
    >
    > Thank you, try again. :-D
    >
    > G.


    Marie callendars for dinner tonight. Bought some on sale. Decent chicken
    pieces, not too spongy. Boston markets too well done. I also buy the dollar
    rice entrees.

    Greg

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