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Thread: Are "stewing chickens" typically skinned?

  1. #1
    phaeton Guest

    Default Are "stewing chickens" typically skinned?

    I was recently looking at the "old fashioned chicken noodle soup"
    recipe in my BH&G. It talks about cutting up a 'whole stewing
    chicken' and simmering it for a couple of hours. It makes no mention
    about chicken skin. I presume that if there is skin left on the meat,
    it will create a frothy scum on the top of the broth, and then peel
    off the meat in sheets. Am I wrong? I don't think i've ever seen skin
    in soup.

    I didn't see a stewing chicken at my local grocery store, but I
    presume that I can substitute the same weight of thighs/wings etc.and
    go along the merry way. I assume I'm peeling the skin off first
    though.

    Bonus question: Is there any good use for chicken skins, if you don't
    have a dog?

    -J

  2. #2
    Aussie Guest

    Default Re: Are "stewing chickens" typically skinned?

    phaeton <[email protected]> wrote in news:0e0b7c42-cd35-4c2e-a7a1-
    [email protected]:

    > I was recently looking at the "old fashioned chicken noodle soup"
    > recipe in my BH&G. It talks about cutting up a 'whole stewing
    > chicken' and simmering it for a couple of hours. It makes no mention
    > about chicken skin. I presume that if there is skin left on the meat,
    > it will create a frothy scum on the top of the broth, and then peel
    > off the meat in sheets. Am I wrong? I don't think i've ever seen skin
    > in soup.
    >
    > I didn't see a stewing chicken at my local grocery store, but I
    > presume that I can substitute the same weight of thighs/wings etc.and
    > go along the merry way. I assume I'm peeling the skin off first
    > though.
    >
    > Bonus question: Is there any good use for chicken skins, if you don't
    > have a dog?
    >
    > -J
    >



    A "stewing chicken" or as we call them "boiling hens" are the older hens
    that were raised for egg laying and not meat consumption.

    You leave the skin on when making any kind of stock/soup, and just skim
    the scum off regularly while it's cooking.

    As for uses for the skin..... if you leave it on and boil it, there's not
    much use for it. Throw it out.

    If you denude the chicken before boiling (which you shouldn't do because
    it adds flavour to the stock), fry them up till crispy, save the fat for
    cooking, and eat the crispy skin :-)

    --
    Peter Lucas
    Hobart
    Tasmania

    The act of feeding someone is an act of beauty,
    whether it's a full Sunday roast or a jam sandwich,
    but only when done with love.

  3. #3
    critters & me in azusa, ca Guest

    Default Re: Are "stewing chickens" typically skinned?

    On Sep 23, 10:27*pm, phaeton <blahbleh...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > I was recently looking at the "old fashioned chicken noodle soup"
    > recipe in my BH&G. *It talks about cutting up a 'whole stewing
    > chicken' and simmering it for a couple of hours. It makes no mention
    > about chicken skin. *I presume that if there is skin left on the meat,
    > it will create a frothy scum on the top of the broth, and then peel
    > off the meat in sheets. Am I wrong? *I don't think i've ever seen skin
    > in soup.
    >
    > I didn't see a stewing chicken at my local grocery store, but I
    > presume that I can substitute the same weight of thighs/wings etc.and
    > go along the merry way. *I assume I'm peeling the skin off first
    > though.
    >
    > Bonus question: *Is there any good use for chicken skins, if you don't
    > have a dog?
    >
    > -J


    i believe that the "egg layers" go directly to the soup factories/pet
    food factories. I've asked for them at the various markets around
    here and have been told, they're not available any longer.


  4. #4
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: Are "stewing chickens" typically skinned?


    "phaeton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I was recently looking at the "old fashioned chicken noodle soup"
    > recipe in my BH&G. It talks about cutting up a 'whole stewing
    > chicken' and simmering it for a couple of hours. It makes no mention
    > about chicken skin. I presume that if there is skin left on the meat,
    > it will create a frothy scum on the top of the broth, and then peel
    > off the meat in sheets. Am I wrong? I don't think i've ever seen skin
    > in soup.
    >
    > I didn't see a stewing chicken at my local grocery store, but I
    > presume that I can substitute the same weight of thighs/wings etc.and
    > go along the merry way. I assume I'm peeling the skin off first
    > though.
    >
    > Bonus question: Is there any good use for chicken skins, if you don't
    > have a dog?
    >
    > -J
    >
    >

    When you braise a whole chicken to make chicken noodle soup you're initially
    making a chicken stock and cooking the meat. You should always leave the
    skin on for the initial 1-1.5 hour braise. There's lots of flavor in the
    skin and in the fat between skin and muscle. To the initial braise I add a
    bay leaf, a celery stalk, and half an onion, occasionally prov. herbs,
    though that's not necessary. When you finish strain the stock into a
    separator funnel and pour off the nonfat portion into the soup pan. Into
    that goes noodles, fresh veggies of chohice, and ultimately the cut up
    chicken from your braise. Top with chopped fresh parsley when you serve.

    It's a great dish when combined with ia great homemade stock.

    Kent






  5. #5
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Are "stewing chickens" typically skinned?

    On Thu, 23 Sep 2010 23:21:21 -0700 (PDT), "critters & me in azusa, ca"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >i believe that the "egg layers" go directly to the soup factories/pet
    >food factories. I've asked for them at the various markets around
    >here and have been told, they're not available any longer.


    I would check at your local farmers market. I have found purveyors
    there that have had them. These are not factory farmed though, and
    they cost significantly more than supermarket chickens.

    Also, quite a few Asian markets sell frozen stewing hens.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  6. #6
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Are "stewing chickens" typically skinned?

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    phaeton <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I was recently looking at the "old fashioned chicken noodle soup"
    > recipe in my BH&G. It talks about cutting up a 'whole stewing
    > chicken' and simmering it for a couple of hours. It makes no mention
    > about chicken skin. I presume that if there is skin left on the meat,
    > it will create a frothy scum on the top of the broth, and then peel
    > off the meat in sheets. Am I wrong? I don't think i've ever seen skin
    > in soup.
    >
    > I didn't see a stewing chicken at my local grocery store, but I
    > presume that I can substitute the same weight of thighs/wings etc.and
    > go along the merry way. I assume I'm peeling the skin off first
    > though.
    >
    > Bonus question: Is there any good use for chicken skins, if you don't
    > have a dog?
    >
    > -J


    Oy.

    I cut them up and LEAVE them in the soup!!!
    Good source of collagen.

    Good for arthritis...
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or
    no influence on society. -- Mark Twain

  7. #7
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Are "stewing chickens" typically skinned?

    Sycophant wrote:

    >> Bonus question: Is there any good use for chicken skins, if you don't
    >> have a dog?

    >
    > I cut them up and LEAVE them in the soup!!!
    > Good source of collagen.
    >
    > Good for arthritis...


    Chicken skin cooked that way is flabby and unpleasant (though neither as
    flabby nor as unpleasant as PVC!)

    Bob


  8. #8
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Are "stewing chickens" typically skinned?

    In article <i7hh8f$d7q$[email protected]>,
    "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "phaeton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > >I was recently looking at the "old fashioned chicken noodle soup"
    > > recipe in my BH&G. It talks about cutting up a 'whole stewing
    > > chicken' and simmering it for a couple of hours. It makes no mention
    > > about chicken skin. I presume that if there is skin left on the meat,
    > > it will create a frothy scum on the top of the broth, and then peel
    > > off the meat in sheets. Am I wrong? I don't think i've ever seen skin
    > > in soup.
    > >
    > > I didn't see a stewing chicken at my local grocery store, but I
    > > presume that I can substitute the same weight of thighs/wings etc.and
    > > go along the merry way. I assume I'm peeling the skin off first
    > > though.
    > >
    > > Bonus question: Is there any good use for chicken skins, if you don't
    > > have a dog?
    > >
    > > -J
    > >
    > >

    > When you braise a whole chicken to make chicken noodle soup you're initially
    > making a chicken stock and cooking the meat. You should always leave the
    > skin on for the initial 1-1.5 hour braise. There's lots of flavor in the
    > skin and in the fat between skin and muscle. To the initial braise I add a
    > bay leaf, a celery stalk, and half an onion, occasionally prov. herbs,
    > though that's not necessary. When you finish strain the stock into a
    > separator funnel and pour off the nonfat portion into the soup pan. Into
    > that goes noodles, fresh veggies of chohice, and ultimately the cut up
    > chicken from your braise. Top with chopped fresh parsley when you serve.
    >
    > It's a great dish when combined with ia great homemade stock.
    >
    > Kent


    Sounds complicated... I pressure cook all stock and soup stuff now. The
    advantage is that, if you leave the pressure cooker SEALED and do not
    open it, the contents are sterile. You can leave the PC on the stove
    for several hours to cool instead of messing around with aliquoting it
    for quick cooling to prevent contamination and food poisoning that can
    be caused by cooking soup in open topped pots.

    The only time I ever had a soup go bad on me was when I slow cooked it
    in an open stock pot.

    Any more, I pressure cook my ingredients, let it cool to room temp on
    the stove then strain it. I refrigerate the solids and broth in
    separate bowls and remove any bones.

    I then de-fat the stock when it's cooled as it's much easier to pick
    solidified fat off the top than use a separator.

    When I make stock or soup, it's most often a 2 day process, but then I
    have no problem with meal planning for days ahead of time. ;-)

    As for chicken skin, I leave it in. It's nutritious and tasty and falls
    apart in shreds when pressure cooked and all the fat cooks out and
    floats to the top of the broth for removal when it's cold.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or
    no influence on society. -- Mark Twain

  9. #9
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Are "stewing chickens" typically skinned?

    On Sep 24, 12:27*am, phaeton <blahbleh...@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > *Is there any good use for chicken skins, if you don't have a dog?


    Fried chicken skins. So crunchy. So delicious.
    >
    > -J


    --Bryan

  10. #10
    Gorio Guest

    Default Re: Are "stewing chickens" typically skinned?


    'Kent[_2_ Wrote:
    > ;1531571']"phaeton" [email protected] wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..-
    > I was recently looking at the "old fashioned chicken noodle soup"
    > recipe in my BH&G. It talks about cutting up a 'whole stewing
    > chicken' and simmering it for a couple of hours. It makes no mention
    > about chicken skin. I presume that if there is skin left on the meat,
    > it will create a frothy scum on the top of the broth, and then peel
    > off the meat in sheets. Am I wrong? I don't think i've ever seen skin
    > in soup.
    >
    > I didn't see a stewing chicken at my local grocery store, but I
    > presume that I can substitute the same weight of thighs/wings etc.and
    > go along the merry way. I assume I'm peeling the skin off first
    > though.
    >
    > Bonus question: Is there any good use for chicken skins, if you don't
    > have a dog?
    >
    > -J
    >
    > -
    > When you braise a whole chicken to make chicken noodle soup you're
    > initially
    > making a chicken stock and cooking the meat. You should always leave the
    >
    > skin on for the initial 1-1.5 hour braise. There's lots of flavor in the
    >
    > skin and in the fat between skin and muscle. To the initial braise I
    > add a
    > bay leaf, a celery stalk, and half an onion, occasionally prov. herbs,
    > though that's not necessary. When you finish strain the stock into a
    > separator funnel and pour off the nonfat portion into the soup pan. Into
    >
    > that goes noodles, fresh veggies of chohice, and ultimately the cut up
    > chicken from your braise. Top with chopped fresh parsley when you
    > serve.
    >
    > It's a great dish when combined with ia great homemade stock.
    >
    > Kent


    I always boil/braise with skin on. It's nice to reserve the fat you
    skim, as it goes well with rosemary and red potatoes. I save the skins
    as dog treats.




    --
    Gorio

  11. #11
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Are "stewing chickens" typically skinned?

    On Thu, 23 Sep 2010 22:27:15 -0700 (PDT), phaeton
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I was recently looking at the "old fashioned chicken noodle soup"
    >recipe in my BH&G. It talks about cutting up a 'whole stewing
    >chicken' and simmering it for a couple of hours. It makes no mention
    >about chicken skin.


    It says WHOLE chicken. duh

  12. #12
    JL Guest

    Default Re: Are "stewing chickens" typically skinned?



    critters & me in azusa, ca wrote:
    > On Sep 23, 10:27 pm, phaeton <blahbleh...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>I was recently looking at the "old fashioned chicken noodle soup"
    >>recipe in my BH&G. It talks about cutting up a 'whole stewing
    >>chicken' and simmering it for a couple of hours. It makes no mention
    >>about chicken skin. I presume that if there is skin left on the meat,
    >>it will create a frothy scum on the top of the broth, and then peel
    >>off the meat in sheets. Am I wrong? I don't think i've ever seen skin
    >>in soup.
    >>
    >>I didn't see a stewing chicken at my local grocery store, but I
    >>presume that I can substitute the same weight of thighs/wings etc.and
    >>go along the merry way. I assume I'm peeling the skin off first
    >>though.
    >>
    >>Bonus question: Is there any good use for chicken skins, if you don't
    >>have a dog?
    >>
    >>-J

    >
    >
    > i believe that the "egg layers" go directly to the soup factories/pet
    > food factories. I've asked for them at the various markets around
    > here and have been told, they're not available any longer.


    Maybe its a west coast thing but i find them in Asian, Black and Mexican
    markets in the SF bay area.

    I have only used them for stock on a couple of occasions, and did not
    notice any particular difference than if i had used a young chicken.

    I did use a capon once for stock (about 6 lb. iirc) and that seemed to
    produce a more intensely flavored stock but i think that had more to do
    with the capon being so large less water was used.

    I remember being disappointed with the amount of stock even if not its
    flavor.
    --

    Mr. Joseph Paul Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.

    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  13. #13
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: Are "stewing chickens" typically skinned?


    "Omelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    > In article <i7hh8f$d7q$[email protected]>,
    > "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "phaeton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >> >I was recently looking at the "old fashioned chicken noodle soup"
    >> > recipe in my BH&G. It talks about cutting up a 'whole stewing
    >> > chicken' and simmering it for a couple of hours. It makes no mention
    >> > about chicken skin. I presume that if there is skin left on the meat,
    >> > it will create a frothy scum on the top of the broth, and then peel
    >> > off the meat in sheets. Am I wrong? I don't think i've ever seen skin
    >> > in soup.
    >> >
    >> > I didn't see a stewing chicken at my local grocery store, but I
    >> > presume that I can substitute the same weight of thighs/wings etc.and
    >> > go along the merry way. I assume I'm peeling the skin off first
    >> > though.
    >> >
    >> > Bonus question: Is there any good use for chicken skins, if you don't
    >> > have a dog?
    >> >
    >> > -J
    >> >
    >> >

    >> When you braise a whole chicken to make chicken noodle soup you're
    >> initially
    >> making a chicken stock and cooking the meat. You should always leave the
    >> skin on for the initial 1-1.5 hour braise. There's lots of flavor in the
    >> skin and in the fat between skin and muscle. To the initial braise I add
    >> a
    >> bay leaf, a celery stalk, and half an onion, occasionally prov. herbs,
    >> though that's not necessary. When you finish strain the stock into a
    >> separator funnel and pour off the nonfat portion into the soup pan. Into
    >> that goes noodles, fresh veggies of chohice, and ultimately the cut up
    >> chicken from your braise. Top with chopped fresh parsley when you serve.
    >>
    >> It's a great dish when combined with ia great homemade stock.
    >>
    >> Kent

    >
    > Sounds complicated... I pressure cook all stock and soup stuff now. The
    > advantage is that, if you leave the pressure cooker SEALED and do not
    > open it, the contents are sterile. You can leave the PC on the stove
    > for several hours to cool instead of messing around with aliquoting it
    > for quick cooling to prevent contamination and food poisoning that can
    > be caused by cooking soup in open topped pots.
    >
    > The only time I ever had a soup go bad on me was when I slow cooked it
    > in an open stock pot.
    >
    > Any more, I pressure cook my ingredients, let it cool to room temp on
    > the stove then strain it. I refrigerate the solids and broth in
    > separate bowls and remove any bones.
    >
    > I then de-fat the stock when it's cooled as it's much easier to pick
    > solidified fat off the top than use a separator.
    >
    > When I make stock or soup, it's most often a 2 day process, but then I
    > have no problem with meal planning for days ahead of time. ;-)
    >
    > As for chicken skin, I leave it in. It's nutritious and tasty and falls
    > apart in shreds when pressure cooked and all the fat cooks out and
    > floats to the top of the broth for removal when it's cold.
    > --
    > Peace! Om
    >
    > Om, if you're making soup stock with chicken in a pressure cooker,
    > however, how do you reduce to the concentration you want? Do you pressure
    > cook the noodles?


    Kent




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