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Thread: Steel-Cut Oats

  1. #1
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Steel-Cut Oats

    What do you do with steel-cut oats, other than make them into breakfast
    porridge? I like them that way, but they must be good for SOMETHING else.

    Bob


  2. #2
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats

    On Mon 25 Jan 2010 04:20:27a, Bob Terwilliger told us...

    > What do you do with steel-cut oats, other than make them into breakfast
    > porridge? I like them that way, but they must be good for SOMETHING else.
    >
    > Bob
    >


    Add cooked oats to pancake or waffle batter, or use in cookie dough. Raw,
    the cooked grains are too hard for anything I can think of.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  3. #3
    whirled peas Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats

    Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    > What do you do with steel-cut oats, other than make them into breakfast
    > porridge? I like them that way, but they must be good for SOMETHING else.
    >
    > Bob


    Make your porridge, but add honey, an ounce of Irish Cream and some
    berries or fruit. You could instead use Drambuie, Scotch Whiskey or
    plain Irish Whiskey, but you will need to add the cream separately.

    The oats could be used, along with other grains, in a mixed-grain pilaf.

    There is a traditional Scottish drink called "Atholl Brose" or just
    "Brose" that starts with a strained infusion of steel-cut oats.

    Steel-cut oats are also known as pinhead oats. You could google for that.

  4. #4
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats

    whirled wrote on Mon, 25 Jan 2010 10:00:46 -0800:

    > Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    >> What do you do with steel-cut oats, other than make them into
    >> breakfast porridge? I like them that way, but they must be
    >> good for SOMETHING else.
    >>
    >> Bob


    > Make your porridge, but add honey, an ounce of Irish Cream and
    > some berries or fruit. You could instead use Drambuie, Scotch Whiskey
    > or plain Irish Whiskey, but you will need to add the
    > cream separately.


    > The oats could be used, along with other grains, in a
    > mixed-grain pilaf.


    > There is a traditional Scottish drink called "Atholl Brose" or
    > just "Brose" that starts with a strained infusion of steel-cut
    > oats.


    There's no requirement that the oats be steel-cut for Atholl Brose but,
    to tell the truth, I don't like it much, even made traditionally with
    heather honey and Scotch. Anyway, not all brose is Atholl Brose! It's
    just oatmeal soaked in boiling water for half an hour or so.
    Originally, shepherds and Highland warriors would carry oatmeal mixed
    with water as food. I quite like rolled oats mixed with raisins; no
    liquid at all!

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  5. #5
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats

    X-No-Archive: yes On Mon, 25 Jan 2010 13:19:13 -0500, "James
    Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > whirled wrote on Mon, 25 Jan 2010 10:00:46 -0800:
    >
    >> Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    >>> What do you do with steel-cut oats, other than make them into
    >>> breakfast porridge? I like them that way, but they must be
    >>> good for SOMETHING else.
    >>>
    >>> Bob

    >
    >> Make your porridge, but add honey, an ounce of Irish Cream and
    >> some berries or fruit. You could instead use Drambuie, Scotch Whiskey
    >> or plain Irish Whiskey, but you will need to add the
    >> cream separately.

    >
    >> The oats could be used, along with other grains, in a
    >> mixed-grain pilaf.

    >
    >> There is a traditional Scottish drink called "Atholl Brose" or
    >> just "Brose" that starts with a strained infusion of steel-cut
    >> oats.

    >
    >There's no requirement that the oats be steel-cut for Atholl Brose but,
    >to tell the truth, I don't like it much, even made traditionally with
    >heather honey and Scotch. Anyway, not all brose is Atholl Brose! It's
    >just oatmeal soaked in boiling water for half an hour or so.
    >Originally, shepherds and Highland warriors would carry oatmeal mixed
    >with water as food. I quite like rolled oats mixed with raisins; no
    >liquid at all!


    Try cranraisins, pretty good

  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats

    On Mon, 25 Jan 2010 03:20:27 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >What do you do with steel-cut oats, other than make them into breakfast
    >porridge? I like them that way, but they must be good for SOMETHING else.
    >

    Haven't done this yet, but want to try it in cookies instead of rolled
    oats.


    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats

    On Mon, 25 Jan 2010 12:30:14 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Mon 25 Jan 2010 04:20:27a, Bob Terwilliger told us...
    >
    >> What do you do with steel-cut oats, other than make them into breakfast
    >> porridge? I like them that way, but they must be good for SOMETHING else.
    >>
    >> Bob
    >>

    >
    >Add cooked oats to pancake or waffle batter, or use in cookie dough. Raw,
    >the cooked grains are too hard for anything I can think of.


    How long do you cook them, Wayne, 10 minutes or all the way?

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats

    On Mon, 25 Jan 2010 10:00:46 -0800, whirled peas <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >The oats could be used, along with other grains, in a mixed-grain pilaf.


    Would you happen to have a recipe to post?

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  9. #9
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats

    On Mon 25 Jan 2010 01:21:06p, sf told us...

    > On Mon, 25 Jan 2010 12:30:14 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Mon 25 Jan 2010 04:20:27a, Bob Terwilliger told us...
    >>
    >>> What do you do with steel-cut oats, other than make them into
    >>> breakfast porridge? I like them that way, but they must be good for
    >>> SOMETHING else.
    >>>
    >>> Bob
    >>>

    >>
    >>Add cooked oats to pancake or waffle batter, or use in cookie dough.
    >>Raw, the cooked grains are too hard for anything I can think of.

    >
    > How long do you cook them, Wayne, 10 minutes or all the way?
    >


    You can do either, depending on what texture you want. I often use
    leftover steel cut oatmeal to add to the batter, but I have also cooked
    them for that specific use and don't cook them as long. I've never timed
    it, but just check every so often until it's the firmness you like.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  10. #10
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats

    sf wrote:

    >> Add cooked oats to pancake or waffle batter, or use in cookie dough. Raw,
    >> the cooked grains are too hard for anything I can think of.

    >
    > How long do you cook them, Wayne, 10 minutes or all the way?


    I often use a little leftover oatmeal porridge in pancake batter. I
    adjust the amount of flour but use the same amount of salt and baking
    powder, then add the oatmeal to the liquid first to get it well stirred
    up. Sometimes I have to add a little liquid or flour to get the right
    consistency. I cook them the same amount of time as for pancakes. The
    oatmeal is already cooked.



  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats

    On Mon, 25 Jan 2010 15:38:58 -0500, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I often use a little leftover oatmeal porridge in pancake batter. I
    >adjust the amount of flour but use the same amount of salt and baking
    >powder, then add the oatmeal to the liquid first to get it well stirred
    >up. Sometimes I have to add a little liquid or flour to get the right
    >consistency. I cook them the same amount of time as for pancakes. The
    >oatmeal is already cooked.


    Thanks for the technique, Dave. I purposely make too much steel cut
    oatmeal because it reheats so well. Oatmeal pancakes are coming soon
    to my house!

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  12. #12
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats

    Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    >
    > What do you do with steel-cut oats, other than make them into breakfast
    > porridge? I like them that way, but they must be good for SOMETHING else.


    Soak in scotch whiskey for a couple of months. The result looks nasty
    but anyone who likes scotch loves it. Named something like brose.

    Given that I like rolled oats mixed into meatloaf I wonder what
    treatment steel cut oats would need before going into the meatloaf.

  13. #13
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats

    On Mon 25 Jan 2010 01:38:58p, Dave Smith told us...

    > sf wrote:
    >
    >>> Add cooked oats to pancake or waffle batter, or use in cookie dough.
    >>> Raw, the cooked grains are too hard for anything I can think of.

    >>
    >> How long do you cook them, Wayne, 10 minutes or all the way?

    >
    > I often use a little leftover oatmeal porridge in pancake batter. I
    > adjust the amount of flour but use the same amount of salt and baking
    > powder, then add the oatmeal to the liquid first to get it well stirred
    > up. Sometimes I have to add a little liquid or flour to get the right
    > consistency. I cook them the same amount of time as for pancakes. The
    > oatmeal is already cooked.
    >


    Good instructions, Dave. It's what I do, but I didn't think to detail for
    sf.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  14. #14
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats

    Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    >
    > What do you do with steel-cut oats, other than make them into breakfast
    > porridge? I like them that way, but they must be good for SOMETHING else.


    I'd bet they'd make a good fish soup.

  15. #15
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats

    On Jan 25, 3:20*am, "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz>
    wrote:
    > What do you do with steel-cut oats, other than make them into breakfast
    > porridge? I like them that way, but they must be good for SOMETHING else.
    >
    > Bob


    Here, try this one:

    Steel-Cut Oat Risotto with Chicken, Red Peppers, and Manchego
    From Cooking Light

    Steel-cut oats are whole-oat groats that have been cut into pieces to
    cook quickly. Find them on the cereal aisle in the supermarket labeled
    "steel-cut Irish oatmeal." Do not substitute quick-cooking Irish
    oatmeal or American-style rolled oats.

    2 (14-ounce) cans fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth
    2 teaspoons olive oil
    3/4 cup finely chopped onion
    1 large red bell pepper, chopped
    1 1/4 cups steel-cut oats
    1/2 cup dry white wine
    1 cup chopped cooked dark meat chicken
    1/2 cup (2 ounces) shredded Manchego cheese
    1 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary
    1/2 teaspoon salt

    Bring broth to a simmer in a medium saucepan (do not boil). Keep warm.

    Heat oil in a medium sauté pan over medium heat. Add onion and pepper;
    sauté 5 minutes. Add oats; cook 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Stir
    in wine; cook 2 minutes or until nearly absorbed, stirring constantly.
    Add broth, 1/2 cup at a time, stirring until each portion of broth is
    absorbed before adding the next (about 20 minutes). Stir in chicken,
    cheese, rosemary, and salt.

    Yield: 4 servings (serving size: 1 cup)

    NUTRITION PER SERVING
    CALORIES 419(30% from fat); FAT 14g (sat 4.4g,mono 5.1g,poly 2.2g);
    PROTEIN 23.3g; CHOLESTEROL 48mg; CALCIUM 143mg; SODIUM 774mg; FIBER
    7.6g; IRON 3.1mg; CARBOHYDRATE 43.2g


  16. #16
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats



    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >
    > On Mon 25 Jan 2010 04:20:27a, Bob Terwilliger told us...
    >
    > > What do you do with steel-cut oats, other than make them into breakfast
    > > porridge? I like them that way, but they must be good for SOMETHING else.
    > >
    > > Bob
    > >

    >
    > Add cooked oats to pancake or waffle batter, or use in cookie dough. Raw,
    > the cooked grains are too hard for anything I can think of.
    >
    >


    It's often used to coat fish for deep-frying. Very tasty that way. Also
    make oatcakes or add them to bread.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandsty...ddrink.recipes

  17. #17
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats

    sf wrote:

    >> I often use a little leftover oatmeal porridge in pancake batter. I
    >> adjust the amount of flour but use the same amount of salt and baking
    >> powder, then add the oatmeal to the liquid first to get it well stirred
    >> up. Sometimes I have to add a little liquid or flour to get the right
    >> consistency. I cook them the same amount of time as for pancakes. The
    >> oatmeal is already cooked.

    >
    > Thanks for the technique, Dave. I purposely make too much steel cut
    > oatmeal because it reheats so well. Oatmeal pancakes are coming soon
    > to my house!



    I am in a bind about the amount of steel cut oats to cook. I tried
    making extra because it takes so much longer to cook and I figured I
    could just reheat it a serving at a time. The problem for me is that I
    just don't like it as much when it has been reheated. I have done it in
    a pan on the burner and in the microwave. Neither way is acceptable.
    However, I am starting to wonder if I could coll it in a pan and fry
    slices of it like you can do with grits or polenta.


    As for oatmeal in pancakes..... I realize that your question was about
    using it in pancakes. FWIW, you can add some quick cooking oatmeal to
    pancake batter, let it sit for a while and then cook it the way you
    would regular pancakes. They taste great and there is a slight texture
    difference.... but a good one.


  18. #18
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats

    On Mon, 25 Jan 2010 20:48:23 -0500, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I am in a bind about the amount of steel cut oats to cook. I tried
    >making extra because it takes so much longer to cook and I figured I
    >could just reheat it a serving at a time. The problem for me is that I
    >just don't like it as much when it has been reheated. I have done it in
    >a pan on the burner and in the microwave. Neither way is acceptable.
    >However, I am starting to wonder if I could coll it in a pan and fry
    >slices of it like you can do with grits or polenta.
    >

    I make one cup, which is 2 large servings. So I reheat mine on the
    stovetop (heavy saucepan, low heat) adding just a smidge of water to
    it and AFAIC it's fine. My grandfather used to make them in a double
    boiler at night, then reheat gently the next morning. They coagulate
    well enough to be fried, but I can't imagine it. Let me know how it
    turns out if you ever do try it.
    >
    >As for oatmeal in pancakes..... I realize that your question was about
    >using it in pancakes. FWIW, you can add some quick cooking oatmeal to
    >pancake batter, let it sit for a while and then cook it the way you
    >would regular pancakes. They taste great and there is a slight texture
    >difference.... but a good one.


    I liked the idea of using up extra oatmeal in pancakes the following
    day vs making it specifically for pancakes. I will try it this week.



    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  19. #19
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats

    Bob Terwilliger wrote:

    > What do you do with steel-cut oats, other than make them into
    > breakfast porridge? I like them that way, but they must be good for
    > SOMETHING else.



    Oat bread...!!!

    :-)


    --
    Best
    Greg



  20. #20
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Steel-Cut Oats

    On 2010-01-25, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > How long do you cook them, Wayne, 10 minutes or all the way?


    .....all the way being about 3 days.

    nb

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