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Thread: Steaming corned beef??

  1. #1
    Theron Guest

    Default Steaming corned beef??

    The Safeway corned beef package I'm about to cook says to steam it, rather
    than braise it. Have any tried it? I've never tried it. I know Pete, above,
    does it routinely. If you're using a heavily salted corned beef I'd think
    you'd end up with something too salty. If you have done this, do you brown
    the brisket first? I've been browning the brisket when I braise and it makes
    quite a difference. You could also use beer in your steaming liquid, though
    I doubt that it would make any difference.
    TIA,

    Ed



  2. #2
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??


    Theron wrote:
    >
    > The Safeway corned beef package I'm about to cook says to steam it, rather
    > than braise it. Have any tried it? I've never tried it. I know Pete, above,
    > does it routinely. If you're using a heavily salted corned beef I'd think
    > you'd end up with something too salty. If you have done this, do you brown
    > the brisket first? I've been browning the brisket when I braise and it makes
    > quite a difference. You could also use beer in your steaming liquid, though
    > I doubt that it would make any difference.
    > TIA,
    >
    > Ed


    Baking it is not steaming it. The water in the pan is mostly to keep the
    drippings from burning, not for steam.

  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??

    Theron <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The Safeway corned beef package I'm about to cook says to steam it, rather
    > than braise it. Have any tried it? I've never tried it. I know Pete, above,
    > does it routinely. If you're using a heavily salted corned beef I'd think
    > you'd end up with something too salty. If you have done this, do you brown
    > the brisket first? I've been browning the brisket when I braise and it makes
    > quite a difference. You could also use beer in your steaming liquid, though
    > I doubt that it would make any difference.
    > TIA,


    I haven't tried the steaming (sound legit - better than simmering),
    but just know that different brands of corned beef have differing
    amounts of salt. One may have 3x as much salt as another. The only
    way to know is to always buy the same brand, or test fry a little
    price first. Some do not need any desalting. Some are still too
    salty after several soaks.

    Or corn your own, which is what I did this year.

    -sw

  4. #4
    Theron Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Theron <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> The Safeway corned beef package I'm about to cook says to steam it,
    >> rather
    >> than braise it. Have any tried it? I've never tried it. I know Pete,
    >> above,
    >> does it routinely. If you're using a heavily salted corned beef I'd think
    >> you'd end up with something too salty. If you have done this, do you
    >> brown
    >> the brisket first? I've been browning the brisket when I braise and it
    >> makes
    >> quite a difference. You could also use beer in your steaming liquid,
    >> though
    >> I doubt that it would make any difference.
    >> TIA,

    >
    > I haven't tried the steaming (sound legit - better than simmering),
    > but just know that different brands of corned beef have differing
    > amounts of salt. One may have 3x as much salt as another. The only
    > way to know is to always buy the same brand, or test fry a little
    > price first. Some do not need any desalting. Some are still too
    > salty after several soaks.
    >
    > Or corn your own, which is what I did this year.
    >
    > -sw


    The safeway product above suggested steaming. We'll see what it ends up
    like. Hopefully not
    too salty. I'm interested in your brine recipe for corning beef Did you use
    nitrite? Did you inject?

    Ed






  5. #5
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??

    Theron <oanon@r[email protected]> wrote:

    > The safeway product above suggested steaming. We'll see what it ends up
    > like. Hopefully not
    > too salty. I'm interested in your brine recipe for corning beef Did you use
    > nitrite? Did you inject?


    I heated water and simmered a bunch of fresh bay leaf, mustard
    seends, cloves, coriander, garlic and peppercorns. I then watered
    that down with a 3 quarts of cold water and added kosher salt until
    I had the right amount (I do all my brines by taste - so don't ask
    how much salt I used).

    Then I trimmed the point off the flat and cut the flat into 2. Each
    half of the flat went into a gallon ziplock with half the brine and
    a tablespoon of Instacure #1. Brined for 3 days and came out
    perfect.

    Longer brining for a 2-2.5" thick flat is unnecessary - some recipes
    tell you 7-10 days, which is BS, even if the point was still
    attached)

    -sw

  6. #6
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??

    Theron <[email protected]> wrote:

    > too salty. I'm interested in your brine recipe for corning beef Did you use
    > nitrite? Did you inject?


    BTW, I would only inject meat if it was over 3.5-4" thick at any
    given point.

    -sw

  7. #7
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Theron <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> The safeway product above suggested steaming. We'll see what it ends up
    >> like. Hopefully not
    >> too salty. I'm interested in your brine recipe for corning beef Did you
    >> use
    >> nitrite? Did you inject?

    >
    > I heated water and simmered a bunch of fresh bay leaf, mustard
    > seends, cloves, coriander, garlic and peppercorns. I then watered
    > that down with a 3 quarts of cold water and added kosher salt until
    > I had the right amount (I do all my brines by taste - so don't ask
    > how much salt I used).
    >
    > Then I trimmed the point off the flat and cut the flat into 2. Each
    > half of the flat went into a gallon ziplock with half the brine and
    > a tablespoon of Instacure #1. Brined for 3 days and came out
    > perfect.
    >
    > Longer brining for a 2-2.5" thick flat is unnecessary - some recipes
    > tell you 7-10 days, which is BS, even if the point was still
    > attached)
    >
    > -sw


    Sorry, dwarf, but brining ain't corning... brining meat must be some kinda
    moron redneck thang... you brine cucumbers and cabbage, not meat.

    I don't particularly endorse these recipes but the corning method is
    correct... it's best to pack like six-ten briskets together.

    http://www.alliedkenco.com/catalog/p.../recipes/key/8



  8. #8
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??

    Theron wrote:

    > The safeway product above suggested steaming. We'll see what it ends up
    > like. Hopefully not
    > too salty. I'm interested in your brine recipe for corning beef Did you use
    > nitrite? Did you inject?


    I have roasted corned beef. Way too salty. My suggestion is to simmer
    the meat as you would normally and finish it off in the oven. Dump some
    barbecue sauce over it if you like. That's tasty!

    I've never heard of steaming corned beef - or any beef. I you'd like to
    try it, use a steamer, not the oven.

    >
    > Ed
    >


  9. #9
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??


    "dsi1" wrote:
    > Theron wrote:
    >
    >> The safeway product above suggested steaming. We'll see what it ends up
    >> like. Hopefully not
    >> too salty. I'm interested in your brine recipe for corning beef Did you
    >> use nitrite? Did you inject?

    >
    > I have roasted corned beef. Way too salty. My suggestion is to simmer the
    > meat as you would normally and finish it off in the oven. Dump some
    > barbecue sauce over it if you like. That's tasty!
    >
    > I've never heard of steaming corned beef - or any beef. I you'd like to
    > try it, use a steamer, not the oven.
    >
    >>
    >> Ed
    >>

    Restaurants use a steam cabinet to to keep corned beef hot all day without
    it drying out, but it's not cooked with steam. Corned beef is cooked in
    copious quantities of water to extract as much salt as possible, otherwise
    it will be inedible to all but the TIADers. Everyone who's cooking corned
    beef with a crockpot or a pressure processor is a TIADer. Anyone who's
    brining and calling it corning is a kitchen imbecile, because what they're
    doing is preparing fercocktah sauer braten.




  10. #10
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??

    brooklyn1 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> Theron <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> The safeway product above suggested steaming. We'll see what it ends up
    >>> like. Hopefully not
    >>> too salty. I'm interested in your brine recipe for corning beef Did you
    >>> use
    >>> nitrite? Did you inject?

    >>
    >> I heated water and simmered a bunch of fresh bay leaf, mustard
    >> seends, cloves, coriander, garlic and peppercorns. I then watered
    >> that down with a 3 quarts of cold water and added kosher salt until
    >> I had the right amount (I do all my brines by taste - so don't ask
    >> how much salt I used).
    >>
    >> Then I trimmed the point off the flat and cut the flat into 2. Each
    >> half of the flat went into a gallon ziplock with half the brine and
    >> a tablespoon of Instacure #1. Brined for 3 days and came out
    >> perfect.
    >>
    >> Longer brining for a 2-2.5" thick flat is unnecessary - some recipes
    >> tell you 7-10 days, which is BS, even if the point was still
    >> attached)

    >
    > Sorry, dwarf, but brining ain't corning... brining meat must be some kinda
    > moron redneck thang... you brine cucumbers and cabbage, not meat.


    Your anal, outdated terminology means nothing to the rest of us.
    Brining (VIA injection, tumbling, and soaking) is the method by
    which *all* manufacturers make corned beef. What you do in your own
    little, ignorant world is meaningless to everyone but yourself.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corned_beef

    -sw

  11. #11
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??

    brooklyn1 wrote:

    > Restaurants use a steam cabinet to to keep corned beef hot all day without
    > it drying out, but it's not cooked with steam. Corned beef is cooked in
    > copious quantities of water to extract as much salt as possible, otherwise
    > it will be inedible to all but the TIADers. Everyone who's cooking corned
    > beef with a crockpot or a pressure processor is a TIADer. Anyone who's
    > brining and calling it corning is a kitchen imbecile, because what they're
    > doing is preparing fercocktah sauer braten.
    >


    Don't look at me, I ain't calling it brining! I would do this corning
    stuff but we don't see brisket much over here anyway. My guess is that
    nobody know how to prepare a uncured brisket. Not that it matters much -
    there no Morton Cure on this island either.

  12. #12
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??

    dsi1 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    >> Restaurants use a steam cabinet to to keep corned beef hot all day without
    >> it drying out, but it's not cooked with steam. Corned beef is cooked in
    >> copious quantities of water to extract as much salt as possible, otherwise
    >> it will be inedible to all but the TIADers. Everyone who's cooking corned
    >> beef with a crockpot or a pressure processor is a TIADer. Anyone who's
    >> brining and calling it corning is a kitchen imbecile, because what they're
    >> doing is preparing fercocktah sauer braten.
    >>

    >
    > Don't look at me, I ain't calling it brining! I would do this corning
    > stuff but we don't see brisket much over here anyway.


    Don't take Sheldon seriously. Corned beef is made VIA brining 99.8%
    of the time.

    -sw

  13. #13
    The Other Guy Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??

    On Tue, 17 Mar 2009 22:19:58 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >Your anal, outdated terminology means


    Save EVERYONE from him, AND from your rants, just twit filter him.





    To reply by email, lose the Ks...


  14. #14
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??

    The Other Guy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Tue, 17 Mar 2009 22:19:58 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Your anal, outdated terminology means

    >
    > Save EVERYONE from him, AND from your rants, just twit filter him.


    What did you hope to accomplish with this post?

    -sw

  15. #15
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??

    Sqwertz wrote:

    > Your anal, outdated terminology means nothing to the rest of us.
    > Brining (VIA injection, tumbling, and soaking) is the method by
    > which *all* manufacturers make corned beef. What you do in your own
    > little, ignorant world is meaningless to everyone but yourself.


    In my mind, it ain't corned beef if it ain't red. That's just my local
    experience with corned beef - in the can, at the refrigerator case at
    Safeway, or in a restaurant.

    Anyway, it's all salt-cured beef brisket. It's likely that whether it's
    reddish or grey in color, salt cured beef prepared either way tastes
    pretty much the same. It's likely that some areas of this country
    prepares corned beef with only salt and it would probably be unwise to
    say that there's no such thing as non-red corned beef.

    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corned_beef
    >
    > -sw


  16. #16
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??

    Sqwertz wrote:

    >
    > Don't take Sheldon seriously. Corned beef is made VIA brining 99.8%
    > of the time.


    I'll strive to take him seriously 75% of the time.

    My guess is that waiting for a piece of meat to soak up a brine solution
    takes too long. I'm betting they'll inject the briskets with many
    needles so technically, it's probably different from what we'd consider
    brining. Well, at least, I'm betting that the bagged stuff I get from
    Safeway is made this way. That's modern meats for ya.

    >
    > -sw


  17. #17
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??

    dsi1 wrote:
    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Don't take Sheldon seriously. Corned beef is made VIA brining 99.8%
    >> of the time.

    >
    > I'll strive to take him seriously 75% of the time.


    That's 74% too much striving.

    > My guess is that waiting for a piece of meat to soak up a brine solution
    > takes too long.


    You guessed wrong. Brining is safer, more reliable, and only takes half
    as long.

    > I'm betting they'll inject the briskets with many
    > needles so technically, it's probably different from what we'd consider
    > brining.


    They are poked and/or tumbled in a vaccuum, then packed in some of the
    brine so they will finish brining during shipment. Either way it's still
    brining.

    -sw

  18. #18
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??


    "dsi1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1cGdneHXMJRQ813UnZ2dnUVZ_tHinZ2d@hawaiiantel. net...
    > brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    >> Restaurants use a steam cabinet to to keep corned beef hot all day
    >> without it drying out, but it's not cooked with steam. Corned beef is
    >> cooked in copious quantities of water to extract as much salt as
    >> possible, otherwise it will be inedible to all but the TIADers. Everyone
    >> who's cooking corned beef with a crockpot or a pressure processor is a
    >> TIADer. Anyone who's brining and calling it corning is a kitchen
    >> imbecile, because what they're doing is preparing fercocktah sauer
    >> braten.
    >>

    >
    > Don't look at me, I ain't calling it brining! I would do this corning
    > stuff but we don't see brisket much over here anyway. My guess is that
    > nobody know how to prepare a uncured brisket. Not that it matters much -
    > there no Morton Cure on this island either.


    Any large cut of beef can be corned, many use round. And cure is totally
    uneccessary, cure is a relatively new invention of modern chemistry, it only
    fixes the red color but for thousands of years corning was done with
    ordinary salt only, the meat will turn grey but it will taste exactly the
    same... eat by candle light.



  19. #19
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??

    brooklyn1 wrote:

    > Any large cut of beef can be corned, many use round. And cure is totally
    > uneccessary, cure is a relatively new invention of modern chemistry, it only
    > fixes the red color but for thousands of years corning was done with
    > ordinary salt only, the meat will turn grey but it will taste exactly the
    > same... eat by candle light.


    Salt *is* a cure. All corned beef needs a cure. Whether it has nitrites
    in it or not. And the nitrites *do* change the taste of the meat. You
    cannot make ham taste like ham without nitrites.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salted_meat

    Is there anything else you know nothing about? Keep 'em coming, as usual.

    -sw

  20. #20
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Steaming corned beef??

    Sheldon wrote:

    > Any large cut of beef can be corned, many use round. And cure is totally
    > uneccessary, cure is a relatively new invention of modern chemistry, it
    > only fixes the red color but for thousands of years corning was done with
    > ordinary salt only, the meat will turn grey but it will taste exactly the
    > same... eat by candle light.


    When Cook's Illustrated took on corned beef in their test kitchen, the
    recipe they ended up preferring was a "grey" corned beef recipe. It's not as
    pretty as the pink stuff, but their tasting panel liked the taste and
    texture a lot better. With the "pink salt," the panel commented that the
    corned beef had a "chemical" flavor and a grainy or chalky mouthfeel.

    One comment made at the time was that a corned chuck blade roast had a
    "melting, buttery" texture, but the panel liked the chewier brisket better.
    Ever since reading that, I've been off-and-on considering making a corned
    chuck roast.

    (The article was in the March/April 1997 issue of Cook's Illustrated.)

    Bob




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