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Thread: Steak Milanese

  1. #1
    Ema Nymton Guest

    Default Steak Milanese

    We went to the dentist in Mexico and we tried Steak Milanese, which
    tasted pretty good. I have never made it, but I would love to. If anyone
    has a recipe, I would love to see it. For now, it is nice be home.

    Becca

  2. #2
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On Sun, 07 Oct 2012 16:49:06 -0500, Ema Nymton <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >We went to the dentist in Mexico and we tried Steak Milanese, which
    >tasted pretty good. I have never made it, but I would love to. If anyone
    >has a recipe, I would love to see it. For now, it is nice be home.
    >
    >Becca


    Often made with cube steak.
    http://www.rachaelrayshow.com/food/r...a-raw-sauce-1/

  3. #3
    Rinshin Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On Sunday, October 7, 2012 2:49:24 PM UTC-7, Ema Nymton wrote:
    > We went to the dentist in Mexico and we tried Steak Milanese, which
    >
    > tasted pretty good. I have never made it, but I would love to. If anyone
    >
    > has a recipe, I would love to see it. For now, it is nice be home.
    >
    >
    >
    > Becca


    Have you tried wiener schnitzel? If you have, did you find it very similar? My understanding is that wiener schnitzel may have the roots in Italy.

  4. #4
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    Rinshin <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sunday, October 7, 2012 2:49:24 PM UTC-7, Ema Nymton wrote:


    >> We went to the dentist in Mexico and we tried Steak Milanese, which
    >>
    >> tasted pretty good. I have never made it, but I would love to. If anyone
    >>
    >> has a recipe, I would love to see it. For now, it is nice be home.


    >Have you tried wiener schnitzel? If you have, did you find it very
    >similar? My understanding is that wiener schnitzel may have the roots
    >in Italy.


    I thought "steak Milanese" was just the tourist name for weiner
    schnitzel in Italy, and more often than not, it is little different
    from what most north Americans would call a "hockey puck"
    as opposed to actual weiner schnitzel.

    Steve

  5. #5
    John John Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On Sun, 7 Oct 2012 16:55:50 -0700 (PDT), Rinshin <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Sunday, October 7, 2012 2:49:24 PM UTC-7, Ema Nymton wrote:
    >> We went to the dentist in Mexico and we tried Steak Milanese, which
    >>
    >> tasted pretty good. I have never made it, but I would love to. If anyone
    >>
    >> has a recipe, I would love to see it. For now, it is nice be home.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Becca

    >
    >Have you tried wiener schnitzel? If you have, did you find it very
    >similar? My understanding is that wiener schnitzel may have the
    >roots in Italy.


    Not in Wien?

    --
    John

  6. #6
    Don Martinich Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Ema Nymton <[email protected]> wrote:

    > We went to the dentist in Mexico and we tried Steak Milanese, which
    > tasted pretty good. I have never made it, but I would love to. If anyone
    > has a recipe, I would love to see it. For now, it is nice be home.
    >
    > Becca


    In northern Mexico, bistec milanesa is chicken fried steak without the
    gravy. The coating was never very thick like you get here in the Central
    Valley. It was always quite good as the beef is flavorful down there.
    (Sonora, Baja California)

  7. #7
    gregz Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    Ema Nymton <[email protected]> wrote:
    > We went to the dentist in Mexico and we tried Steak Milanese, which
    > tasted pretty good. I have never made it, but I would love to. If anyone
    > has a recipe, I would love to see it. For now, it is nice be home.
    >
    > Becca


    I wish my dentist offered steak.

    That reminds me, I need to floss.

    Greg

  8. #8
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    John John wrote:

    >> Have you tried wiener schnitzel? If you have, did you find it very
    >> similar? My understanding is that wiener schnitzel may have the
    >> roots in Italy.


    > Not in Wien?


    There's a debate going on, obviously everybody wants the paternity of that
    dish. There are some differences too, the Shcnitzel is made from a boneless
    veal slice while the Milanese is from a veal chop with the bone.
    A documented Schnitzel exuisted before the first documented apparition of
    the Milanese, but it was not breaded: just floured. Then there's a report
    from general Radetzky, who J. Strauss tributed with a famous march, who had
    a cutlet in Milan which was washed in beaten eggs and "differently from the
    Austrian Schnitzel" was breaded. Then there's a document from 1148, quoted
    bu teh historian Pietro Verri, where is described a solemn lunch where the
    third course was "lombos cum panitio" aka breaded veal chops. This would set
    the title to Milan but a quoted source isn't certain as a concrete source.
    So the debate goes one, while historians search for sources and people eat
    cutlets
    --
    Firma predefinita



  9. #9
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On Oct 7, 11:51*pm, "ViLco" <villi...@tin.it> wrote:
    > John John wrote:
    > >> Have you tried wiener schnitzel? *If you have, did you find it very
    > >> similar? *My understanding is that wiener schnitzel may have the
    > >> roots in Italy.

    > > Not in Wien?

    >
    > There's a debate going on, obviously everybody wants the paternity of that
    > dish. There are some differences too, the Shcnitzel is made from a boneless
    > veal slice while the Milanese is from a veal chop with the bone.
    > A documented Schnitzel exuisted before the first documented apparition of
    > the Milanese, but it was not breaded: just floured. Then there's a report
    > from general Radetzky, who J. Strauss tributed with a famous march, who had
    > a cutlet in Milan which was washed in beaten eggs and "differently from the
    > Austrian Schnitzel" was breaded. Then there's a document from 1148, quoted
    > bu teh historian Pietro Verri, where is described a solemn lunch where the
    > third course was "lombos cum panitio" aka breaded veal chops. This would set
    > the title to Milan but a quoted source isn't certain as a concrete source..
    > So the debate goes one, while historians search for sources and people eat
    > cutlets


    The Wiener Schnitzel is pounded thin*, but what about the Milanese?

    *At least in my experience.

  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On Sun, 07 Oct 2012 16:49:06 -0500, Ema Nymton <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > We went to the dentist in Mexico and we tried Steak Milanese, which
    > tasted pretty good. I have never made it, but I would love to. If anyone
    > has a recipe, I would love to see it. For now, it is nice be home.
    >

    I've never made it, let's be honest - I've never ordered it either,
    but I see it's made with cube steak so I might try this recipe
    http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/cu..._milanese.html


    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  11. #11
    merlenee Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese


    I have become entranced by Mexican food and I especially enjoy milanesa.
    However the steak they use is very thin and I am not sure what kind it
    is. Perhaps someone could shed some light on the subject?




    --
    merlenee

  12. #12
    George Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On 10/7/2012 6:07 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    > On Sun, 07 Oct 2012 16:49:06 -0500, Ema Nymton <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> We went to the dentist in Mexico and we tried Steak Milanese, which
    >> tasted pretty good. I have never made it, but I would love to. If anyone
    >> has a recipe, I would love to see it. For now, it is nice be home.
    >>
    >> Becca

    >
    > Often made with cube steak.
    > http://www.rachaelrayshow.com/food/r...a-raw-sauce-1/
    >


    Maybe on the Rachel Ray show but if you actually go to Mexico you would
    find it made with pounded thin beef.

  13. #13
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On 10/8/2012 4:44 AM, sf wrote:
    > On Sun, 07 Oct 2012 16:49:06 -0500, Ema Nymton <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> We went to the dentist in Mexico and we tried Steak Milanese, which
    >> tasted pretty good. I have never made it, but I would love to. If anyone
    >> has a recipe, I would love to see it. For now, it is nice be home.
    >>

    > I've never made it, let's be honest - I've never ordered it either,
    > but I see it's made with cube steak so I might try this recipe
    > http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/cu..._milanese.html
    >
    >

    The Milanese is a local cut of meat here. It's a very, very thin slice
    of beef, probably round or sirloin. They bread it and shallow-fry it
    like a cutlet, schnitzel, what have you. I do not believe it is pounded,
    just sliced almost wafer-thin. There is also a chicken version made
    from thin sliced chicken breast.

    I'm on the US side of the border where Becca went to Mexico.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  14. #14
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    "ViLco" wrote :

    John John wrote:

    >>> Have you tried wiener schnitzel? If you have, did you find it very
    >>> similar? My understanding is that wiener schnitzel may have the
    >>> roots in Italy.


    >> Not in Wien?


    > There's a debate going on, obviously everybody wants the paternity of that
    > dish.


    No debate. The paternity is in Vienna.

    > There are some differences too, the Shcnitzel is made from a boneless veal
    > slice while the Milanese is from a veal chop with the bone.


    Most Milanese I've had were pork.

    > A documented Schnitzel exuisted before the first documented apparition of
    > the Milanese, but it was not breaded: just floured.


    Yes, but that't the name of the cut. "Schnitz" means "cut, slice",
    "Schnitzel"
    is the diminuitive "little slice".

    > Then there's a report from general Radetzky, who J. Strauss tributed with
    > a famous march, who had a cutlet in Milan which was washed in beaten eggs
    > and "differently from the Austrian Schnitzel" was breaded.


    With a mixture of egg and grated Parmiggiano.

    >Then there's a document from 1148, quoted bu teh historian Pietro Verri,
    >where is described a solemn lunch where the third course was "lombos cum
    >panitio" aka breaded veal chops. This would set


    Which also could mean veal chops with small rolls. Medieval Latin and
    Italian
    is rather diffuse.

    > the title to Milan but a quoted source isn't certain as a concrete source.
    > So the debate goes one, while historians search for sources and people eat
    > cutlets


    Not cutlets, Schnitzel ;-)

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner




  15. #15
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    "ViLco" wrote :
    >
    >Most Milanese I've had were pork.


    Most Milanese I've porked were hoes. LOL

  16. #16
    John John Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On Mon, 08 Oct 2012 16:08:00 -0400, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    >"ViLco" wrote :
    >>
    >>Most Milanese I've had were pork.

    >
    >Most Milanese I've porked were hoes. LOL


    Because hoes are all you can get.


  17. #17
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    Michael Kuettner wrote:

    >> There's a debate going on, obviously everybody wants the paternity
    >> of that dish.


    > No debate. The paternity is in Vienna.


    LOL

    >> There are some differences too, the Shcnitzel is made from a
    >> boneless veal slice while the Milanese is from a veal chop with the
    >> bone.


    > Most Milanese I've had were pork.


    Hence those were not milaneses

    >> A documented Schnitzel exuisted before the first documented
    >> apparition of the Milanese, but it was not breaded: just floured.


    > Yes, but that't the name of the cut. "Schnitz" means "cut, slice",
    > "Schnitzel" is the diminuitive "little slice".


    I know, but what matters here is that the Schnitzel pre-milanese was not
    breaded, it appeared in its breaded form only AFTER the milanese

    >> Then there's a report from general Radetzky, who J. Strauss tributed
    >> with a famous march, who had a cutlet in Milan which was washed in
    >> beaten eggs and "differently from the Austrian Schnitzel" was
    >> breaded.


    > With a mixture of egg and grated Parmiggiano.


    And then what do we discover? Nowadays Schnitzel is breaded just like a
    milanese

    >> Then there's a document from 1148, quoted bu teh historian Pietro
    >> Verri, where is described a solemn lunch where the third course was
    >> "lombos cum panitio" aka breaded veal chops. This would set


    > Which also could mean veal chops with small rolls. Medieval Latin and
    > Italian is rather diffuse.


    In fact the best source is Radetzky.

    >> the title to Milan but a quoted source isn't certain as a concrete
    >> source. So the debate goes one, while historians search for sources
    >> and people eat cutlets


    > Not cutlets, Schnitzel ;-)


    Not schnitzels, Cotolette
    --
    Firma predefinita



  18. #18
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    Janet Wilder wrote:

    > The Milanese is a local cut of meat here. It's a very, very thin
    > slice of beef, probably round or sirloin. They bread it and
    > shallow-fry it like a cutlet, schnitzel, what have you. I do not
    > believe it is pounded, just sliced almost wafer-thin. There is also
    > a chicken version made from thin sliced chicken breast.


    I sometimes cook some chicken cutlets and jave them in soft breadrolls.

    > I'm on the US side of the border where Becca went to Mexico.


    OK, next step is a milanese in a tortilla wrap
    --
    Firma predefinita



  19. #19
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On Mon, 08 Oct 2012 12:06:20 -0500, Janet Wilder
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The Milanese is a local cut of meat here. It's a very, very thin slice
    > of beef, probably round or sirloin. They bread it and shallow-fry it
    > like a cutlet, schnitzel, what have you. I do not believe it is pounded,
    > just sliced almost wafer-thin. There is also a chicken version made
    > from thin sliced chicken breast.


    Thanks. Is that the same cut people call a minute steak?

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  20. #20
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On 10/9/2012 7:02 AM, sf wrote:
    > On Mon, 08 Oct 2012 12:06:20 -0500, Janet Wilder
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> The Milanese is a local cut of meat here. It's a very, very thin slice
    >> of beef, probably round or sirloin. They bread it and shallow-fry it
    >> like a cutlet, schnitzel, what have you. I do not believe it is pounded,
    >> just sliced almost wafer-thin. There is also a chicken version made
    >> from thin sliced chicken breast.

    >
    > Thanks. Is that the same cut people call a minute steak?
    >


    I don't believe so. Milanese is thinner than minute steak.

    I have traveled all over the US and found that cuts of meat available in
    one part of the country are not in other parts of the country. For
    example, you will be hard pressed to find a tri-tip on the east coast.
    Never even heard of one until I went to Southern California.

    The only place I can find the slightly boomerang-shaped "London Broil"
    cut is in the Mid-Atlantic area.

    There are cuts of meat here on the border that are decidedly Mexican or
    Tex-Mex in origin.

    Until we traveled extensively while living in the RV, I had no idea that
    meat cuts were different from one geographic/cultural area to another.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

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