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Thread: Steak Milanese

  1. #21
    Ema Nymton Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On 10/7/2012 5:07 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:

    > Often made with cube steak.
    > http://www.rachaelrayshow.com/food/r...a-raw-sauce-1/


    Thanks for the recipe. They say steak milanese is popular in Mexico, and
    different chefs are known for their breading, which they say, makes
    their dish unique. Ours was so lightly breaded, you could barely tell
    it was there. I enjoyed it.

    Becca



  2. #22
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On 10/9/2012 10:37 AM, Ema Nymton wrote:
    > On 10/7/2012 5:07 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    >> Often made with cube steak.
    >> http://www.rachaelrayshow.com/food/r...a-raw-sauce-1/
    >>

    >
    > Thanks for the recipe. They say steak milanese is popular in Mexico, and
    > different chefs are known for their breading, which they say, makes
    > their dish unique. Ours was so lightly breaded, you could barely tell
    > it was there. I enjoyed it.
    >
    > Becca
    >
    >

    Becca,
    What is the name and location of the restaurant you ate at?

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  3. #23
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    Janet Wilder wrote:
    >sf wrote:
    >> Janet Wilder wrote:
    >>
    >>> The Milanese is a local cut of meat here. It's a very, very thin slice
    >>> of beef, probably round or sirloin. They bread it and shallow-fry it
    >>> like a cutlet, schnitzel, what have you. I do not believe it is pounded,
    >>> just sliced almost wafer-thin. There is also a chicken version made
    >>> from thin sliced chicken breast.

    >>
    >> Thanks. Is that the same cut people call a minute steak?

    >
    >I don't believe so. Milanese is thinner than minute steak.


    That is pure gobbledygook, without specifying which section of beef
    your minute steak remark is meaningless. Milanese is typically
    prepared from thinner cuts of cube steak, which of course can be from
    several different cuts of beef, usually the poorer parts of round.
    Minute steak can also be from several sections, but minute steak is
    from more tender cuts and is thinner than cubed steak. Milaneses is
    merely breaded cube steak, very similar to chicken fried. Milanese
    can be thiner or thicker, depending on how it will be cooked.

    >I have traveled all over the US and found that cuts of meat available in
    >one part of the country are not in other parts of the country.


    There are several names for the same cuts... you need to educate
    yourself... there is much information about meat on the net and were
    you truly interested there are infinite books on meat cuts and which
    names are used at different locations.

    >For example, you will be hard pressed to find a tri-tip on the east coast.
    >Never even heard of one until I went to Southern California.


    I'm positive that there is lots you haven't heard of.

    >Until we traveled extensively while living in the RV, I had no idea that
    >meat cuts were different from one geographic/cultural area to another.


    So, for most of your life you lived under the same rock.

    Yeah, the cattle in each location have a different anatomy. LOL
    It's easy to find tri-tip everywhere, just ask the meat cutter.
    http://www.askthemeatman.com/tri-tip.htm

    There are many cuts of beef that use place names that vary from place
    to place (California added to a cut is popular) but they are all
    talking the very same cut.

  4. #24
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On Oct 9, 7:19*am, Janet Wilder <kelliepoo...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > On 10/9/2012 7:02 AM, sf wrote:
    >
    > > On Mon, 08 Oct 2012 12:06:20 -0500, Janet Wilder
    > > <kelliepoo...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >
    > >> The Milanese is a local cut of meat here. *It's a very, very thin slice
    > >> of beef, probably round *or sirloin. *They bread it and shallow-fry it
    > >> like a cutlet, schnitzel, what have you. I do not believe it is pounded,
    > >> just sliced almost wafer-thin. *There is also a chicken version made
    > >> from thin sliced chicken breast.

    >
    > > Thanks. *Is that the same cut people call a minute steak?

    >
    > I don't believe so. Milanese is thinner than minute steak.
    >
    > I have traveled all over the US and found that cuts of meat available in
    > one part of the country are not in other parts of the country. *For
    > example, you will be hard pressed to find a tri-tip on the east coast.
    > Never even heard of one until I went to Southern California.
    >
    > The only place I can find the slightly boomerang-shaped "London Broil"
    > cut is in the Mid-Atlantic area.
    >
    > There are cuts of meat here on the border that are decidedly Mexican or
    > Tex-Mex in origin.


    Do you have a meat cut called "filete"? What other name would you give
    it?

    I was in a Mexamerican butcher shop a long time ago, and I got the
    idea that filete was their air-dried beef, but I suspect I was
    mistaken.

    >
    > Until we traveled extensively while living in the RV, I had no idea that
    > meat cuts were different from one geographic/cultural area to another.


    In Chicago, London broil was flank steak sliced thinly against the
    grain and rolled into coils. We had flat bone and wedge bone sirloin
    steaks. In California, London Broil is a lump of round, sirloin steaks
    are boneless, and there are "Market steaks."

    >
    > --
    > Janet Wilder
    > Way-the-heck-south Texas
    > Spelling doesn't count. *Cooking does.



  5. #25
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On Oct 9, 1:24*am, "ViLco" <villi...@tin.it> wrote:
    > Michael Kuettner wrote:
    > >> There's a debate going on, obviously everybody wants the paternity
    > >> of that dish.

    > > No debate. The paternity is in Vienna.

    >
    > LOL
    >
    > >> There are some differences too, the Shcnitzel is made from a
    > >> boneless veal slice while the Milanese is from a veal chop with the
    > >> bone.

    > > Most Milanese I've had were pork.

    >
    > Hence those were not milaneses
    >


    Vilco, buddy --

    Is the milanese flattened? If so, what keeps the bone from being
    shattered?

  6. #26
    Ema Nymton Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On 10/9/2012 11:05 AM, Janet Wilder wrote:

    > Becca,
    > What is the name and location of the restaurant you ate at?


    It was Los Gallos Taqueria on International Boulevard. I noticed they
    also had a butcher shop, which was located up the street.

    Becca



  7. #27
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 09:42:43 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In Chicago, London broil was flank steak sliced thinly against the
    > grain and rolled into coils. We had flat bone and wedge bone sirloin
    > steaks. In California, London Broil is a lump of round, sirloin steaks
    > are boneless, and there are "Market steaks."


    Aren't you in the SFBA? There are no market steaks where I shop, but
    what's available at the butcher counter often varies. I remember when
    I lived in Palo Alto, exactly *one* market had a divine beef roast
    they called it a "Jewish Filet". It was made up of tail ends of
    some mystery muscle (I suspected filet, but that was never confirmed)
    and the pieces were tied together to form one large roast. I never
    found it anywhere else and no butcher working elsewhere has even heard
    of it.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  8. #28
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On Tuesday, October 9, 2012 4:24:52 AM UTC-4, ViLco wrote:
    > Michael Kuettner wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > >> There's a debate going on, obviously everybody wants the paternity

    >
    > >> of that dish.

    >
    >
    >
    > > No debate. The paternity is in Vienna.

    >
    >
    >
    > LOL
    >
    >
    >
    > >> There are some differences too, the Shcnitzel is made from a

    >
    > >> boneless veal slice while the Milanese is from a veal chop with the

    >
    > >> bone.

    >
    >
    >
    > > Most Milanese I've had were pork.

    >
    >
    >
    > Hence those were not milaneses
    >
    >
    >
    > >> A documented Schnitzel exuisted before the first documented

    >
    > >> apparition of the Milanese, but it was not breaded: just floured.

    >
    >
    >
    > > Yes, but that't the name of the cut. "Schnitz" means "cut, slice",

    >
    > > "Schnitzel" is the diminuitive "little slice".

    >
    >
    >
    > I know, but what matters here is that the Schnitzel pre-milanese was not
    >
    > breaded, it appeared in its breaded form only AFTER the milanese
    >
    >
    >
    > >> Then there's a report from general Radetzky, who J. Strauss tributed

    >
    > >> with a famous march, who had a cutlet in Milan which was washed in

    >
    > >> beaten eggs and "differently from the Austrian Schnitzel" was

    >
    > >> breaded.

    >
    >
    >
    > > With a mixture of egg and grated Parmiggiano.

    >
    >
    >
    > And then what do we discover? Nowadays Schnitzel is breaded just like a
    >
    > milanese
    >
    >
    >
    > >> Then there's a document from 1148, quoted bu teh historian Pietro

    >
    > >> Verri, where is described a solemn lunch where the third course was

    >
    > >> "lombos cum panitio" aka breaded veal chops. This would set

    >
    >
    >
    > > Which also could mean veal chops with small rolls. Medieval Latin and

    >
    > > Italian is rather diffuse.

    >
    >
    >
    > In fact the best source is Radetzky.
    >
    >
    >
    > >> the title to Milan but a quoted source isn't certain as a concrete

    >
    > >> source. So the debate goes one, while historians search for sources

    >
    > >> and people eat cutlets

    >
    >
    >
    > > Not cutlets, Schnitzel ;-)

    >
    >
    >
    > Not schnitzels, Cotolette
    >
    > --
    >
    > Firma predefinita


    Why don't you shut the **** up and let the first-worlders talk? If we need advice on how savages do things, you'll be the first person we contact.

  9. #29
    John John Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 16:19:00 -0700 (PDT), [email protected] wrote:

    >Why don't you shut the **** up and let the first-worlders
    >talk? If we need advice on how savages do things,
    >you'll be the first person we contact.


    Notice who comes last

    http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_World:

    List of First World nations

    (This list is not complete)

    Andorra
    Australia
    Austria
    Belgium
    Canada
    Denmark
    Finland
    France
    Germany
    Iceland
    Israel
    Italy
    Japan
    Monaco
    Netherlands
    New Zealand
    Norway
    Portugal
    Spain
    Sweden
    Switzerland
    Turkey
    United Kingdom
    United States

  10. #30
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On 10/9/2012 11:42 AM, spamtrap1888 wrote:
    > On Oct 9, 7:19 am, Janet Wilder <kelliepoo...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >> On 10/9/2012 7:02 AM, sf wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Mon, 08 Oct 2012 12:06:20 -0500, Janet Wilder
    >>> <kelliepoo...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >>
    >>>> The Milanese is a local cut of meat here. It's a very, very thin slice
    >>>> of beef, probably round or sirloin. They bread it and shallow-fry it
    >>>> like a cutlet, schnitzel, what have you. I do not believe it is pounded,
    >>>> just sliced almost wafer-thin. There is also a chicken version made
    >>>> from thin sliced chicken breast.

    >>
    >>> Thanks. Is that the same cut people call a minute steak?

    >>
    >> I don't believe so. Milanese is thinner than minute steak.
    >>
    >> I have traveled all over the US and found that cuts of meat available in
    >> one part of the country are not in other parts of the country. For
    >> example, you will be hard pressed to find a tri-tip on the east coast.
    >> Never even heard of one until I went to Southern California.
    >>
    >> The only place I can find the slightly boomerang-shaped "London Broil"
    >> cut is in the Mid-Atlantic area.
    >>
    >> There are cuts of meat here on the border that are decidedly Mexican or
    >> Tex-Mex in origin.

    >
    > Do you have a meat cut called "filete"? What other name would you give
    > it?


    We don't have anything called that. It's a very, very thinly sliced
    piece of either round or sirloin.
    >
    > I was in a Mexamerican butcher shop a long time ago, and I got the
    > idea that filete was their air-dried beef, but I suspect I was
    > mistaken.
    >
    >>
    >> Until we traveled extensively while living in the RV, I had no idea that
    >> meat cuts were different from one geographic/cultural area to another.

    >
    > In Chicago, London broil was flank steak sliced thinly against the
    > grain and rolled into coils. We had flat bone and wedge bone sirloin
    > steaks. In California, London Broil is a lump of round, sirloin steaks
    > are boneless, and there are "Market steaks."

    Never heard of a "market steak"



    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  11. #31
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On 10/9/2012 12:31 PM, Ema Nymton wrote:
    > On 10/9/2012 11:05 AM, Janet Wilder wrote:
    >
    >> Becca,
    >> What is the name and location of the restaurant you ate at?

    >
    > It was Los Gallos Taqueria on International Boulevard. I noticed they
    > also had a butcher shop, which was located up the street.
    >
    > Becca
    >
    >


    thanks. I might just check it out. Was hoping it was in Nuevo Progreso

    I'll have a house guest in early November and we will go to Nuevo
    Progreso one day. I thought I'd take her to lunch there. I like Angel's
    all the way upstairs, and the Red Snapper. Arturo's has the nicest
    ambiance.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  12. #32
    meredith123 Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese


    well....
    Its a great sharing i was in search of these tips and tricks




    --
    meredith123

  13. #33
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    spamtrap1888 wrote:

    > Vilco, buddy --
    >
    > Is the milanese flattened? If so, what keeps the bone from being
    > shattered?


    There are two version of cotoletta alla milanese: cotoletta and orecchia
    d'elefante (elephant's ear). The first one is the traditional one, with its
    bone and no flattening. The second gets its name from the shape it assumes
    during cooking, since there's not a bone to keep it flat, and this second
    one gets flattened.
    Many elders from Milan think the elephant ear is just a bastardization of
    the real one which is the bone-in, non-flattened cotoletta.
    --
    Firma predefinita



  14. #34
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    John John wrote:

    >> Why don't you shut the **** up and let the first-worlders
    >> talk? If we need advice on how savages do things,
    >> you'll be the first person we contact.


    > Notice who comes last
    > http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_World:
    > List of First World nations


    The trademark of these no-balls fakes is ignorance, a strong and well rooted
    ignorance
    --
    Firma predefinita



  15. #35
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    Ema Nymton wrote:

    > We went to the dentist in Mexico and we tried Steak Milanese, which
    > tasted pretty good. I have never made it, but I would love to. If
    > anyone has a recipe, I would love to see it. For now, it is nice be
    > home.


    How rude, I read all the thread and also participated but forgot to answer
    your question.

    Grated dried-up bread
    A slice of veal lombata* with bone
    Clarified butter or peanut oil
    beaten eggs
    Optional: grated aged cheese

    Beat the eggs, wash the slices of meat into it, pass them into a bowl with
    the grated dried bread, toss into frying pan in 1/2 inch of oil/butter until
    golden to brown on both sides. Serve as hot as you can and make sure to have
    a lemon ready at the table.
    Someone seasons the breadcrumbs with grated aged cheese or minced garlic
    and/or parsley.

    * lombata:
    --
    Firma predefinita



  16. #36
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    ViLco wrote:

    * lombata: tre vocabularies are giving out alot of results but 'm sure the
    right one is only one, and I'm not sure it's in this list: chine, loin,
    sirloin.
    Anyway, a cut from which one can obtain bone-in slice like these:
    http://manzotin.blogspot.it/2010/03/...-viennese.html
    --
    Firma predefinita



  17. #37
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    Janet Wilder wrote:
    >
    > The Milanese is a local cut of meat here.


    Actually Milanese is NOT a cut of meat, Milanese is a cooking method;
    a la Milan.

  18. #38
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On Wednesday, October 10, 2012 9:33:02 AM UTC-4, ViLco wrote:
    > John John wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > >> Why don't you shut the **** up and let the first-worlders

    >
    > >> talk? If we need advice on how savages do things,

    >
    > >> you'll be the first person we contact.

    >
    >
    >
    > > Notice who comes last

    >
    > > http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_World:

    >
    > > List of First World nations

    >
    >
    >
    > The trademark of these no-balls fakes is ignorance, a strong and well rooted
    >
    > ignorance
    >
    > --
    >
    > Firma predefinita


    Jam it, you filthy wop.

  19. #39
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On Oct 10, 10:38*am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    > Janet Wilder wrote:
    >
    > > The Milanese is a local cut of meat here.

    >
    > Actually Milanese is NOT a cut of meat, Milanese is a cooking method;
    > a la Milan.


    They mean "prepared to cook as," you dolt. In the meat department
    where I shop, I can buy fajitas, stew beef, kebabs, and stir fry beef.

  20. #40
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Steak Milanese

    On Oct 10, 10:48*am, medav...@gmail.com wrote:
    > On Wednesday, October 10, 2012 9:33:02 AM UTC-4, ViLco wrote:
    > > John John wrote:

    >
    > > >> Why don't you shut the **** up and let the first-worlders

    >
    > > >> talk? If we need advice on how savages do things,

    >
    > > >> you'll be the first person we contact.

    >
    > > > Notice who comes last

    >
    > > >http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_World:

    >
    > > > List of First World nations

    >
    > > The trademark of these no-balls fakes is ignorance, a strong and well rooted

    >
    > > ignorance

    >
    > > --

    >
    > > Firma predefinita

    >
    > Jam it, you filthy wop.


    If you're that lonely, try volunteering at a soup kitchen.

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