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Thread: stand up mixers and croissants

  1. #1
    Julia Altshuler Guest

    Default stand up mixers and croissants

    I like to bake. Usually I make small batches of cookies, muffins, quick
    breads. I combine ingredients in a bowl and mix by hand with a wooden
    spoon or wire whip. From time to time I make yeast bread. I knead by hand.


    Recently we've been thinking about how much we like croissants and how
    there's no bakery around here that makes good ones and how far we drive
    in the quest for the perfect croissant. We've been thinking about
    making them ourselves.


    I bought _Baking Illustrated: The Practical Kitchen Companion for the
    Home Baker_. This is the book by the editors of Cook's Illustrated
    Magzine, America's Test Kitchen people with Christopher Kimball, the guy
    with the bowtie. I know we all like to argue about television
    celebrities, but I like those people. I find the information
    well-presented and informative.


    The book recommends a stand-up mixer for the croissant dough. We don't
    have one, and I'm looking for advice on whether we need one. It's the
    usual consideration of balancing cost and counter space against how much
    we'd actually use it. We do have a cuisinart which is kept under the
    counter and brought out from time to time. Has anyone found that having
    a stand-up mixer makes a big difference in making croissants, or is
    doing that part by hand or cuisinart just as good? I don't want to buy
    a big appliance for one task, but neither do I want to risk bad results
    because I wasn't willing to start with the right equipment.


    --Lia


  2. #2
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: stand up mixers and croissants

    Julia Altshuler wrote:
    > I like to bake. Usually I make small batches of cookies, muffins, quick
    > breads. I combine ingredients in a bowl and mix by hand with a wooden
    > spoon or wire whip. From time to time I make yeast bread. I knead by
    > hand.
    >
    >
    > Recently we've been thinking about how much we like croissants and how
    > there's no bakery around here that makes good ones and how far we drive
    > in the quest for the perfect croissant. We've been thinking about
    > making them ourselves.
    >
    >
    > I bought _Baking Illustrated: The Practical Kitchen Companion for the
    > Home Baker_. This is the book by the editors of Cook's Illustrated
    > Magzine, America's Test Kitchen people with Christopher Kimball, the guy
    > with the bowtie. I know we all like to argue about television
    > celebrities, but I like those people. I find the information
    > well-presented and informative.
    >
    >
    > The book recommends a stand-up mixer for the croissant dough. We don't
    > have one, and I'm looking for advice on whether we need one. It's the
    > usual consideration of balancing cost and counter space against how much
    > we'd actually use it. We do have a cuisinart which is kept under the
    > counter and brought out from time to time. Has anyone found that having
    > a stand-up mixer makes a big difference in making croissants, or is
    > doing that part by hand or cuisinart just as good? I don't want to buy
    > a big appliance for one task, but neither do I want to risk bad results
    > because I wasn't willing to start with the right equipment.


    If your food processor can combine the dough's ingredients quickly
    enough to prevent excessive gluten formation, then your FP will work
    just fine.

    Croissants use multifold pastry dough. Handling of the dough during
    rolling, folding and shaping will also require speed and cold conditions
    or too much gluten will form and your shortening may melt away before
    baking.

  3. #3
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: stand up mixers and croissants

    Julia Altshuler wrote:
    > I like to bake. Usually I make small batches of cookies, muffins, quick
    > breads. I combine ingredients in a bowl and mix by hand with a wooden
    > spoon or wire whip. From time to time I make yeast bread. I knead by
    > hand.
    >
    >
    > Recently we've been thinking about how much we like croissants and how
    > there's no bakery around here that makes good ones and how far we drive
    > in the quest for the perfect croissant. We've been thinking about
    > making them ourselves.
    >
    >
    > I bought _Baking Illustrated: The Practical Kitchen Companion for the
    > Home Baker_. This is the book by the editors of Cook's Illustrated
    > Magzine, America's Test Kitchen people with Christopher Kimball, the guy
    > with the bowtie. I know we all like to argue about television
    > celebrities, but I like those people. I find the information
    > well-presented and informative.
    >
    >
    > The book recommends a stand-up mixer for the croissant dough. We don't
    > have one, and I'm looking for advice on whether we need one. It's the
    > usual consideration of balancing cost and counter space against how much
    > we'd actually use it. We do have a cuisinart which is kept under the
    > counter and brought out from time to time. Has anyone found that having
    > a stand-up mixer makes a big difference in making croissants, or is
    > doing that part by hand or cuisinart just as good? I don't want to buy
    > a big appliance for one task, but neither do I want to risk bad results
    > because I wasn't willing to start with the right equipment.


    If your food processor can combine the dough's ingredients quickly
    enough to prevent excessive gluten formation, then your FP will work
    just fine.

    Croissants use multifold pastry dough. Handling of the dough during
    rolling, folding and shaping will also require speed and cold conditions
    or too much gluten will form and your shortening may melt away before
    baking.

  4. #4
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: stand up mixers and croissants

    On Jun 25, 6:20*am, Julia Altshuler <jaltshu...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > I like to bake. *Usually I make small batches of cookies, muffins, quick
    > breads. *I combine ingredients in a bowl and mix by hand with a wooden
    > spoon or wire whip. *From time to time I make yeast bread. *I knead by hand.
    >
    > Recently we've been thinking about how much we like croissants and how
    > there's no bakery around here that makes good ones and how far we drive
    > in the quest for the perfect croissant. *We've been thinking about
    > making them ourselves.
    >
    > I bought _Baking Illustrated: The Practical Kitchen Companion for the
    > Home Baker_. *This is the book by the editors of Cook's Illustrated
    > Magzine, America's Test Kitchen people with Christopher Kimball, the guy
    > with the bowtie. *I know we all like to argue about television
    > celebrities, but I like those people. *I find the information
    > well-presented and informative.
    >
    > The book recommends a stand-up mixer for the croissant dough. *We don't
    > have one, and I'm looking for advice on whether we need one. *It's the
    > usual consideration of balancing cost and counter space against how much
    > we'd actually use it. *We do have a cuisinart which is kept under the
    > counter and brought out from time to time. *Has anyone found that having
    > a stand-up mixer makes a big difference in making croissants, or is
    > doing that part by hand or cuisinart just as good? *I don't want to buy
    > a big appliance for one task, but neither do I want to risk bad results
    > because I wasn't willing to start with the right equipment.
    >
    > --Lia


    I think you should go for it! I've made them lots of times, and they
    are not hard, just tedious. And no, you don't need a mixer- just knead
    by hand. Follow the directions- you need to keep your dough chilled so
    the butter doesn't melt. Also, use unsalted butter. You will be really
    happy with the results! Sometimes I will roll a slice of proscitto
    (sp) in the crescent, or a chunk of chocolate- yum!! Good luck- you
    can do it!

  5. #5
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: stand up mixers and croissants

    On Jun 25, 6:20*am, Julia Altshuler <jaltshu...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > I like to bake. *Usually I make small batches of cookies, muffins, quick
    > breads. *I combine ingredients in a bowl and mix by hand with a wooden
    > spoon or wire whip. *From time to time I make yeast bread. *I knead by hand.
    >
    > Recently we've been thinking about how much we like croissants and how
    > there's no bakery around here that makes good ones and how far we drive
    > in the quest for the perfect croissant. *We've been thinking about
    > making them ourselves.
    >
    > I bought _Baking Illustrated: The Practical Kitchen Companion for the
    > Home Baker_. *This is the book by the editors of Cook's Illustrated
    > Magzine, America's Test Kitchen people with Christopher Kimball, the guy
    > with the bowtie. *I know we all like to argue about television
    > celebrities, but I like those people. *I find the information
    > well-presented and informative.
    >
    > The book recommends a stand-up mixer for the croissant dough. *We don't
    > have one, and I'm looking for advice on whether we need one. *It's the
    > usual consideration of balancing cost and counter space against how much
    > we'd actually use it. *We do have a cuisinart which is kept under the
    > counter and brought out from time to time. *Has anyone found that having
    > a stand-up mixer makes a big difference in making croissants, or is
    > doing that part by hand or cuisinart just as good? *I don't want to buy
    > a big appliance for one task, but neither do I want to risk bad results
    > because I wasn't willing to start with the right equipment.
    >
    > --Lia


    I think you should go for it! I've made them lots of times, and they
    are not hard, just tedious. And no, you don't need a mixer- just knead
    by hand. Follow the directions- you need to keep your dough chilled so
    the butter doesn't melt. Also, use unsalted butter. You will be really
    happy with the results! Sometimes I will roll a slice of proscitto
    (sp) in the crescent, or a chunk of chocolate- yum!! Good luck- you
    can do it!

  6. #6
    Woolstitcher Guest

    Default Re: stand up mixers and croissants


    "Julia Altshuler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I like to bake. Usually I make small batches of cookies, muffins, quick
    >breads. I combine ingredients in a bowl and mix by hand with a wooden
    >spoon or wire whip. From time to time I make yeast bread. I knead by
    >hand.
    >
    >
    > Recently we've been thinking about how much we like croissants and how
    > there's no bakery around here that makes good ones and how far we drive in
    > the quest for the perfect croissant. We've been thinking about making
    > them ourselves.
    >
    >
    > I bought _Baking Illustrated: The Practical Kitchen Companion for the Home
    > Baker_. This is the book by the editors of Cook's Illustrated Magzine,
    > America's Test Kitchen people with Christopher Kimball, the guy with the
    > bowtie. I know we all like to argue about television celebrities, but I
    > like those people. I find the information well-presented and informative.
    >
    >
    > The book recommends a stand-up mixer for the croissant dough. We don't
    > have one, and I'm looking for advice on whether we need one. It's the
    > usual consideration of balancing cost and counter space against how much
    > we'd actually use it. We do have a cuisinart which is kept under the
    > counter and brought out from time to time. Has anyone found that having a
    > stand-up mixer makes a big difference in making croissants, or is doing
    > that part by hand or cuisinart just as good? I don't want to buy a big
    > appliance for one task, but neither do I want to risk bad results because
    > I wasn't willing to start with the right equipment.
    >
    >
    > --Lia
    >


    Before I would invest in a stand mixer to only make croissants, I would
    invest $10-$20 in a 24 inch by 24 inch pc of scrap marble countertop or a
    large marble tile. Mine is 24 by 36 inches.
    Keep the tile in the fridge (or outside in cold weather), and use as a
    pastry board. Works wonders w/ pie crust as well.




  7. #7
    Woolstitcher Guest

    Default Re: stand up mixers and croissants


    "Julia Altshuler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I like to bake. Usually I make small batches of cookies, muffins, quick
    >breads. I combine ingredients in a bowl and mix by hand with a wooden
    >spoon or wire whip. From time to time I make yeast bread. I knead by
    >hand.
    >
    >
    > Recently we've been thinking about how much we like croissants and how
    > there's no bakery around here that makes good ones and how far we drive in
    > the quest for the perfect croissant. We've been thinking about making
    > them ourselves.
    >
    >
    > I bought _Baking Illustrated: The Practical Kitchen Companion for the Home
    > Baker_. This is the book by the editors of Cook's Illustrated Magzine,
    > America's Test Kitchen people with Christopher Kimball, the guy with the
    > bowtie. I know we all like to argue about television celebrities, but I
    > like those people. I find the information well-presented and informative.
    >
    >
    > The book recommends a stand-up mixer for the croissant dough. We don't
    > have one, and I'm looking for advice on whether we need one. It's the
    > usual consideration of balancing cost and counter space against how much
    > we'd actually use it. We do have a cuisinart which is kept under the
    > counter and brought out from time to time. Has anyone found that having a
    > stand-up mixer makes a big difference in making croissants, or is doing
    > that part by hand or cuisinart just as good? I don't want to buy a big
    > appliance for one task, but neither do I want to risk bad results because
    > I wasn't willing to start with the right equipment.
    >
    >
    > --Lia
    >


    Before I would invest in a stand mixer to only make croissants, I would
    invest $10-$20 in a 24 inch by 24 inch pc of scrap marble countertop or a
    large marble tile. Mine is 24 by 36 inches.
    Keep the tile in the fridge (or outside in cold weather), and use as a
    pastry board. Works wonders w/ pie crust as well.




  8. #8
    Julia Altshuler Guest

    Default Re: stand up mixers and croissants

    Woolstitcher wrote:
    >
    > Before I would invest in a stand mixer to only make croissants, I would
    > invest $10-$20 in a 24 inch by 24 inch pc of scrap marble countertop or a
    > large marble tile. Mine is 24 by 36 inches.
    > Keep the tile in the fridge (or outside in cold weather), and use as a
    > pastry board. Works wonders w/ pie crust as well.



    That, I can do. I'm only wishing I'd picked one up at the discount
    store when I saw them several months ago. At the time, I was thinking
    that they looked gorgeous, then couldn't justify buying something for no
    purpose. Now I realize that it looks gorgeous AND has a purpose.


    I'll start by mixing in the cuisinart. If I'm unhappy with the results,
    I'll try kneading by hand. With the summer weather going from scorching
    to thunderstorm so quickly, it'll be hard to get the timing right.
    We'll want to work with cold dough during the scorch, then have the oven
    on during the storm.


    Thanks to all. I'll report back when I have some croissants to tell you
    about.


    --Lia


  9. #9
    Julia Altshuler Guest

    Default Re: stand up mixers and croissants

    Woolstitcher wrote:
    >
    > Before I would invest in a stand mixer to only make croissants, I would
    > invest $10-$20 in a 24 inch by 24 inch pc of scrap marble countertop or a
    > large marble tile. Mine is 24 by 36 inches.
    > Keep the tile in the fridge (or outside in cold weather), and use as a
    > pastry board. Works wonders w/ pie crust as well.



    That, I can do. I'm only wishing I'd picked one up at the discount
    store when I saw them several months ago. At the time, I was thinking
    that they looked gorgeous, then couldn't justify buying something for no
    purpose. Now I realize that it looks gorgeous AND has a purpose.


    I'll start by mixing in the cuisinart. If I'm unhappy with the results,
    I'll try kneading by hand. With the summer weather going from scorching
    to thunderstorm so quickly, it'll be hard to get the timing right.
    We'll want to work with cold dough during the scorch, then have the oven
    on during the storm.


    Thanks to all. I'll report back when I have some croissants to tell you
    about.


    --Lia


  10. #10
    Julia Altshuler Guest

    Default Croissants

    As we speak, the croissants have had their 4th turn and are now in the
    fridge chilling for another 2 hours awaiting time for shaping, rolling,
    and baking. We've done our best to follow instructions. We mixed and
    kneaded by hand. Jim got out a ruler to make sure we were forming a 14"
    square correctly. We had the book out every step of the way and read it
    to each other. We don't have a marble block, but we'll keep an eye out
    for one and buy one if we can find it for a good price. The original
    plan was to see how we did with plain croissants, but now we can't
    resist going out to the store for almonds so we can try the frangipane
    filling. Jim is starting to notice that it doesn't look like we made
    that many. We're excited to try these. If they come out good, we might
    have to double the recipe.


    --Lia


  11. #11
    Julia Altshuler Guest

    Default Re: Croissants

    The results from yesterday's croissant baking marathon are mixed. I was
    excited at the prospect of making perfect flaky buttery croissants on
    the first try. It wasn't a total disaster, but the reality fell short
    of expectation.


    I can't put my finger on it, but I didn't like the flavor. The big
    mistake I made was forgetting the salt. I'm so in the habit when
    cooking of leaving the salt out in the kitchen. That way I can put it
    on at the table, and Jim can leave it off. When baking, I always used
    to buy salted butter, then leave off adding salt from the container.
    This time I screwed up, used unsalted butter, and forgot to add the
    teaspoon of table salt the recipe called for.


    The problem with the flavor could also have been the flour. We used
    King Arthur. The book recommends Gold Metal. Our technique might need
    refining. It was fun rolling out the dough and doing the turns, but I
    can see how if you don't do it exactly right, you can incorporate the
    butter instead of getting it to layer.


    One success was the frangipane. We'd never made that from scratch
    before, and it was wonderful. It's something I'll put in other
    desserts. Already I'm thinking about putting it with apples and pears,
    maybe in phyllo dough.


    --Lia


  12. #12
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Croissants


    "Julia Altshuler" schrieb :
    <snip croissant baking marathon>
    > The problem with the flavor could also have been the flour. We used King
    > Arthur. The book recommends Gold Metal. Our technique might need refining.
    > It was fun rolling out the dough and doing the turns, but I can see how if you
    > don't do it exactly right, you can incorporate the butter instead of getting
    > it to layer.


    Try to use Hungarian flour. AFAIK, that's the closest to the flour
    we use over here you can get in the USA.

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner



  13. #13
    Julia Altshuler Guest

    Default Re: Croissants

    Michael Kuettner wrote:
    >
    > Try to use Hungarian flour. AFAIK, that's the closest to the flour
    > we use over here you can get in the USA.



    I'd never heard of Hungarian flour so I googled. I hoped to find a
    picture of what a 5# bag would look like so I could find it easily at
    the supermarket. No luck. Please help.


    The funny thing about this is that Jim has started looking on ebay to
    see how much it would cost to outfit an entire commercial croissant
    making enterprise. We are NOT professional bakers. We didn't even get
    great results when we tried to make 12 croissants at home. (I asked him
    if we were going to put the equipment in the living room or the back
    yard.) But as long as there's an internet, why not dream big? So while
    we're at it, why not find a source for hundreds of pounds Hungarian flour?


    --Lia


  14. #14
    Billy Guest

    Default Re: Croissants

    On Sun, 29 Jun 2008 15:53:17 +0200, "Michael Kuettner"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Try to use Hungarian flour. AFAIK, that's the closest to the flour
    >we use over here you can get in the USA.


    That might be a little confusing....check out


    http://www.sourdoughhome.com/huhialflourtest.html



    The name confuses everyone. Many people here in Gunnison, Colorado, at
    an altitude of 7,700 feet (2,346 meters) above sea level, think this
    flour is good to use at high altitudes. Actually, it's no better than
    any other flour at high altitudes. And they are confused about the
    "Hungarian" part too.

    The "Hungarian" part of the name comes from the process used to mill
    the flour, which was developed in Hungary in the 1800's. It was
    brought to Colorado by J.K. Mullen in 1875, and is still used on this
    flour. The flour is milled from hard wheat from Colorado, the Dakotas,
    and Montana, so the "high altitude" refers to where the grain is
    grown.



  15. #15
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Croissants


    "Julia Altshuler" <[email protected]> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:[email protected] ..
    > Michael Kuettner wrote:
    >> Try to use Hungarian flour. AFAIK, that's the closest to the flour
    >> we use over here you can get in the USA.

    >
    >
    > I'd never heard of Hungarian flour so I googled. I hoped to find a picture of
    > what a 5# bag would look like so I could find it easily at the supermarket.
    > No luck. Please help.
    >

    Hungarian flour is a very fine grained wheat flour. See below.
    >
    > The funny thing about this is that Jim has started looking on ebay to see how
    > much it would cost to outfit an entire commercial croissant making enterprise.
    > We are NOT professional bakers. We didn't even get great results when we
    > tried to make 12 croissants at home. (I asked him if we were going to put the
    > equipment in the living room or the back yard.) But as long as there's an
    > internet, why not dream big? So while we're at it, why not find a source for
    > hundreds of pounds Hungarian flour?
    >

    After googling, I guess you'll want to use "pastry flour" or "cake flour".
    For fluffy things like croissants you need a very fine-milled wheat flour,
    like those two above.

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner





  16. #16
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Croissants


    "Billy" schrieb :
    > On Sun, 29 Jun 2008 15:53:17 +0200, "Michael Kuettner" wrote:
    >
    >>Try to use Hungarian flour. AFAIK, that's the closest to the flour
    >>we use over here you can get in the USA.

    >
    > That might be a little confusing....check out
    >
    >
    > http://www.sourdoughhome.com/huhialflourtest.html
    >
    >

    Thanks for the info (see also my other post) .
    The tiny details of USAn cooking are so very different
    from what I'm used to.

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner







  17. #17
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Croissants

    "Julia Altshuler" <jaltsh[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio > The
    results from yesterday's croissant baking marathon are mixed. I was
    > excited at the prospect of making perfect flaky buttery croissants on the
    > first try. It wasn't a total disaster, but the reality fell short of
    > expectation.
    >
    >
    > I can't put my finger on it, but I didn't like the flavor. The big
    > mistake I made was forgetting the salt. I'm so in the habit when cooking
    > of leaving the salt out in the kitchen. That way I can put it on at the
    > table, and Jim can leave it off. When baking, I always used to buy salted
    > butter, then leave off adding salt from the container. This time I screwed
    > up, used unsalted butter, and forgot to add the teaspoon of table salt the
    > recipe called for.
    >
    >
    > The problem with the flavor could also have been the flour. We used King
    > Arthur. The book recommends Gold Metal. Our technique might need
    > refining. It was fun rolling out the dough and doing the turns, but I can
    > see how if you don't do it exactly right, you can incorporate the butter
    > instead of getting it to layer.


    I feel sure it is the salt. Tuscan and Umbrian bread are made without salt
    and they taste like toilet paper.
    >
    >
    > One success was the frangipane. We'd never made that from scratch before,
    > and it was wonderful. It's something I'll put in other desserts. Already
    > I'm thinking about putting it with apples and pears, maybe in phyllo
    > dough.
    >
    >
    > --Lia
    >




  18. #18
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Croissants

    On Sun, 29 Jun 2008 11:10:32 -0400, Billy <Hereiam@hotmaildotcom>
    wrote:

    >The "Hungarian" part of the name comes from the process used to mill
    >the flour, which was developed in Hungary in the 1800's. It was
    >brought to Colorado by J.K. Mullen in 1875, and is still used on this
    >flour. The flour is milled from hard wheat from Colorado, the Dakotas,
    >and Montana, so the "high altitude" refers to where the grain is
    >grown.


    I bet you can't buy 5 pounds for $5 anymore either. What has it gone
    up to?


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  19. #19
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Croissants

    On Jun 29, 9:48�am, Julia Altshuler <jaltshu...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > The results from yesterday's croissant baking marathon are mixed. �I was
    > excited at the prospect of making perfect flaky buttery croissants on
    > the first try. �It wasn't a total disaster, but the reality fell short
    > of expectation.
    >
    > I can't put my finger on it, but I didn't like the flavor. �The big
    > mistake I made was forgetting the salt. �I'm so in the habit when
    > cooking of leaving the salt out in the kitchen. �That way I can put it
    > on at the table, and Jim can leave it off. �When baking, I alwaysused
    > to buy salted butter, then leave off adding salt from the container.
    > This time I screwed up, used unsalted butter, and forgot to add the
    > teaspoon of table salt the recipe called for.
    >
    > The problem with the flavor could also have been the flour. �We used
    > King Arthur. �The book recommends Gold Metal. �Our technique might need
    > refining. It was fun rolling out the dough and doing the turns, but I
    > can see how if you don't do it exactly right, you can incorporate the
    > butter instead of getting it to layer.
    >
    > One success was the frangipane. �We'd never made that from scratch
    > before, and it was wonderful. �It's something I'll put in other
    > desserts. �Already I'm thinking about putting it with apples and pears,
    > maybe in phyllo dough.
    >
    > --Lia


    It was definitely the lack of salt that kept your croissants from
    tasting the way they should. Without salt baked goods have a bland
    pasty taste to them. The fact that the recipe suggested Gold Medal
    flour means nothing. The publishers of the book probably had an
    advertising deal with the makers of Gold Medal flour. There's nothing
    unique about Gold Medal flour.

  20. #20
    Billy Guest

    Default Re: Croissants

    On Sun, 29 Jun 2008 11:11:55 -0700 (PDT), "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > There's nothing
    >unique about Gold Medal flour.


    Oh but, but there is something unique about Gold Medal. It is a blend
    of select hard and soft wheat.

    On the other hand White Lily is ONLY soft wheat flour great for
    biscuits, etc.

    From hardest to softest flours: durum wheat flour and semolina flour
    (typically used for making pastas), whole wheat flour and graham flour
    (typically mixed with all-purpose or bread flour to make bread or
    baked goods), bread flour (typically used for making yeast breads),
    all-purpose flour (can be used for breads and baked goods), pastry
    flour (typically used for pastries), and cake flour (typically used
    for cakes).



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