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Thread: St benard cake

  1. #1
    hahabogus Guest

    Default St benard cake

    It was pretty it was a devil food cake made from scratch and the 2 layers
    were cut into 4 layers. It was filled and iced with a chocolate real
    whipped cream mixuter...I tried to sent a picture of it to AFB...it said it
    went but I couldn't see it so who knows.

    --

    The house of the burning beet-Alan




  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: St benard cake

    On Sun, 06 Jul 2008 18:32:23 GMT, hahabogus <[email protected]> wrote:

    >It was pretty it was a devil food cake made from scratch and the 2 layers
    >were cut into 4 layers. It was filled and iced with a chocolate real
    >whipped cream mixuter...I tried to sent a picture of it to AFB...it said it
    >went but I couldn't see it so who knows.


    Maybe your server is slow. It's there... twice.


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  3. #3
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: St benard cake

    hahabogus wrote:
    > It was pretty it was a devil food cake made from scratch and the 2 layers
    > were cut into 4 layers. It was filled and iced with a chocolate real
    > whipped cream mixuter...I tried to sent a picture of it to AFB...it said it
    > went but I couldn't see it so who knows.
    >


    I saw two -- One titled "St Benard Tort" and one "St Benard Cake".

    Serene

    --
    "I think I have an umami receptor that has developed sentience." -- Stef

  4. #4
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: St benard cake

    On Sun, 06 Jul 2008 18:32:23 GMT, hahabogus <[email protected]> fired
    up random neurons and synapses to opine:

    >It was pretty it was a devil food cake made from scratch and the 2 layers
    >were cut into 4 layers. It was filled and iced with a chocolate real
    >whipped cream mixuter...I tried to sent a picture of it to AFB...it said it
    >went but I couldn't see it so who knows.


    Do you have a tried-and-true technique for slicing a layer in half
    evenly? The closest I can come is with dental floss and that's not
    perfect. Boston Cream Pie comes to mind...

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    --
    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"





  5. #5
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: St benard cake

    Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Sun, 06 Jul 2008 18:32:23 GMT, hahabogus <[email protected]> fired
    > up random neurons and synapses to opine:
    >
    >>It was pretty it was a devil food cake made from scratch and the 2
    >>layers were cut into 4 layers. It was filled and iced with a chocolate
    >>real whipped cream mixuter...I tried to sent a picture of it to
    >>AFB...it said it went but I couldn't see it so who knows.

    >
    > Do you have a tried-and-true technique for slicing a layer in half
    > evenly? The closest I can come is with dental floss and that's not
    > perfect. Boston Cream Pie comes to mind...
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    > --
    > "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    > old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    > waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."
    >
    > -- Duncan Hines
    >
    > To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >


    I bought the cake...I thought cutting with a long thin knife while
    rotating the cake worked...I've never attempted to make a 2 layer cake a
    4 layer cake. I don't bake that much; sorry.

    I thought the dental floss idea was for cutting slices from a cheese
    cake. And of course for dental hygene.

    --

    The house of the burning beet-Alan




  6. #6
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: St benard cake


    On 6-Jul-2008, hahabogus <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I thought the dental floss idea was for cutting slices from a cheese
    > cake. And of course for dental hygene.
    >


    FDA warns that it is vitally important for the use to be in that order;
    first cut the cheesecake with the piece of floss, then clean your teeth with
    it. ;-)
    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  7. #7
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: St benard cake

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    > On Sun, 06 Jul 2008 18:32:23 GMT, hahabogus <[email protected]> fired
    > up random neurons and synapses to opine:
    >
    >> It was pretty it was a devil food cake made from scratch and the 2 layers
    >> were cut into 4 layers. It was filled and iced with a chocolate real
    >> whipped cream mixuter...I tried to sent a picture of it to AFB...it said it
    >> went but I couldn't see it so who knows.

    >
    > Do you have a tried-and-true technique for slicing a layer in half
    > evenly? The closest I can come is with dental floss and that's not
    > perfect. Boston Cream Pie comes to mind...
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd


    I vaguely remember seeing a TV chef sticking toothpicks all around the
    perimeter of a cake, halfway between top and bottom and using those to
    keep a knife at the right level.

    gloria p


  8. #8
    John Kane Guest

    Default Re: St benard cake

    On Jul 6, 10:15*pm, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@meatloaf.net> wrote:
    > On Sun, 06 Jul 2008 18:32:23 GMT, hahabogus <inva...@null.null> fired
    > up random neurons and synapses to opine:
    >
    > >It was pretty it was a devil food cake made from scratch and the 2 layers
    > >were cut into 4 layers. It was filled and iced with a chocolate real
    > >whipped cream mixuter...I tried to sent a picture of it to AFB...it saidit
    > >went but I couldn't see it so who knows.

    >
    > Do you have a tried-and-true technique for slicing a layer in half
    > evenly? The closest I can come is with dental floss and that's not
    > perfect. Boston Cream Pie comes to mind...


    Dental floss is okay but probablyl the best is a large slicing knife
    ( 10-2\12 inch) the kind with the blunt or rounded end. I've never
    seen them except in professional kitchens .

    John Kane Kingston ON Canada

  9. #9
    sandi Guest

    Default Re: St benard cake

    Lou Decruss <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 19:18:47 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    > <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:
    >
    >>Squeaks asked:
    >>
    >>> Do you have a tried-and-true technique for slicing a layer
    >>> in half evenly? The closest I can come is with dental floss
    >>> and that's not perfect. Boston Cream Pie comes to mind...

    >>
    >>I have something called a "cake saw," though it seems
    >>difficult to find online. Here's a picture of one:
    >>
    >>http://www.csernigm.hu/egyeb10.gif
    >>
    >>The little wire-looking thing is actually a tiny raspy wire
    >>saw, which cuts through the cake. You can slide the cutting
    >>surface up and down on the post to vary the height of the
    >>layers. (On mine, there are actually *two* cutters, so you can
    >>make three layers out of one.)

    >
    > I had one and hadn't used it in many years so I got rid of it.
    > But this is a better picture.
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/5nfe8h
    >
    > Lou


    Here's a nifty one that hasn't been released yet.
    Wilton Large Cake Leveler
    http://preview.tinyurl.com/55spjx

  10. #10
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: St benard cake

    Squeaks asked:

    > Do you have a tried-and-true technique for slicing a layer in half
    > evenly? The closest I can come is with dental floss and that's not
    > perfect. Boston Cream Pie comes to mind...


    I have something called a "cake saw," though it seems difficult to find
    online. Here's a picture of one:

    http://www.csernigm.hu/egyeb10.gif

    The little wire-looking thing is actually a tiny raspy wire saw, which cuts
    through the cake. You can slide the cutting surface up and down on the post
    to vary the height of the layers. (On mine, there are actually *two*
    cutters, so you can make three layers out of one.)

    Bob


  11. #11
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: St benard cake

    On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 19:18:47 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >Squeaks asked:
    >
    >> Do you have a tried-and-true technique for slicing a layer in half
    >> evenly? The closest I can come is with dental floss and that's not
    >> perfect. Boston Cream Pie comes to mind...

    >
    >I have something called a "cake saw," though it seems difficult to find
    >online. Here's a picture of one:
    >
    >http://www.csernigm.hu/egyeb10.gif
    >
    >The little wire-looking thing is actually a tiny raspy wire saw, which cuts
    >through the cake. You can slide the cutting surface up and down on the post
    >to vary the height of the layers. (On mine, there are actually *two*
    >cutters, so you can make three layers out of one.)


    I had one and hadn't used it in many years so I got rid of it. But
    this is a better picture.

    http://tinyurl.com/5nfe8h

    Lou

  12. #12
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: St benard cake

    On Thu 10 Jul 2008 07:18:47p, Bob Terwilliger told us...

    > Squeaks asked:
    >
    >> Do you have a tried-and-true technique for slicing a layer in half
    >> evenly? The closest I can come is with dental floss and that's not
    >> perfect. Boston Cream Pie comes to mind...

    >
    > I have something called a "cake saw," though it seems difficult to find
    > online. Here's a picture of one:
    >
    > http://www.csernigm.hu/egyeb10.gif
    >
    > The little wire-looking thing is actually a tiny raspy wire saw, which
    > cuts through the cake. You can slide the cutting surface up and down on
    > the post to vary the height of the layers. (On mine, there are actually
    > *two* cutters, so you can make three layers out of one.)
    >
    > Bob


    I bought one like this one "used" from a restaurant supply house. Although
    it's a bit pricey at regular price, I paid about $25 for it.

    http://www.pastrychef.com/CAKE-SLICER_p_35-984.html

    I prefer baking a cake recipe in a 4" deep springform pan, then slicing
    into 3 or 4 layers. I also use it to level the top layer. Makes a much
    prettier, more professional looking cake. Every attempt I've made using a
    long knife has always left me with layers at weird angles. :-)

    As to cheesecake, I still find the super-slick floss ideal for cutting an
    entire cheeseake into wedges. The best method is to hold a length of floss
    across the entire cheesecake, then push straight down into the crust, then
    pull the floss through from one side to the other without lifting upward.
    Perfect slices everytime.

    HTH

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Thursday, 07(VII)/10(X)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    -------------------------------------------
    Bad taste is timeless.
    -------------------------------------------





  13. #13
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: St benard cake

    Wayne wrote:

    > As to cheesecake, I still find the super-slick floss ideal for cutting an
    > entire cheeseake into wedges. The best method is to hold a length of floss
    > across the entire cheesecake, then push straight down into the crust, then
    > pull the floss through from one side to the other without lifting upward.
    > Perfect slices everytime.


    That reminds me:

    Alton Brown fabricated a nifty little cheese-cutting gadget: Cut a slot in
    an old cutting board. Affix one end of a guitar string to the underside of
    the board, right where the slot is. Cut the string to a handy length (a few
    inches more than the length of the slot you cut). Fasten a metal ring to
    that end of the guitar string. To cut a wedge of cheese, put the rind end
    near the point where the string meets the board, put the guitar string
    exactly where you want the cut to be, and use the ring to pull down and make
    the cut.

    Of course, with something as soft as cheesecake, there's no need for such
    force, and dental floss (as Wayne wrote) is just fine.

    Bob


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