Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 140

Thread: Special tricks

  1. #21
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks

    jmcquown wrote:
    >
    > "Polly Esther" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > > We only eat 'out' once a month. That's about 89 meals to prepare at
    > > home.


    > 89 meals in 12 months? That's not a lot of cooking. I don't eat out once a
    > month but I still cook more meals than that. There are still 365 days in
    > the year, aren't there?


    She was saying 89 meals to cook in ONE month...and one meal out.
    Average 30 days in one month, 3 meals per day. 89 to cook and one to eat
    out.

    Gary

  2. #22
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks

    On Mar 7, 7:40*am, Pennyaline <norwegianb...@beatifulplummage.innit>
    wrote:
    > On 3/7/2012 8:14 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >
    > > Don't have buttermilk? Add a Tablespoonful of white vinegar to a cup of
    > > milk. Stir and let the vinegar curdle the milk. This even works with
    > > non-fat milk.

    >
    > A tablespoon of vinegar in a cup of milk? That's a hell of a lot of
    > vinegar just to make imitation buttermilk. In my experience, a
    > teaspoonful or less in a cup of milk will cause sufficient souring and
    > curdling.
    >
    > > Use 1/2 c. white vinegar plus a carafe of cold water to clean the coffee
    > > maker.

    >
    > You mean to clean the carafe itself? That's not nearly enough vinegar to
    > run a coffee maker cleaning cycle, for which half a carafe is recommended..
    >
    > > 2 Tbs. white vinegar + 1 tsp. baking soda + a drizzle of water makes
    > > jewelry sparkle.

    >
    > I've noticed lately that there is a warning on the labels of vinegar
    > containers to keep it away from jewelry.
    >
    > > White vinegar & water in a spray bottle makes a great window cleaner.

    >
    > If all you're doing is removing soap residues, streaks and smudges from
    > interior windows and mirrors, yes. But detergent is required to clean
    > off real dirt and grime. Vinegar and water will polish things up once
    > the grime is off.
    >
    > > Another hint: Use newspaper to clean windows. Don't ask me why, but it
    > > works.

    >
    > I've been hearing that all my life. I don't know why it works either,
    > but I do know that it's worth it to avoid the lint that comes from cloth
    > and paper towels.


    I use coffee filters...

  3. #23
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks

    Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Tue, 6 Mar 2012 22:32:50 -0600, "Polly Esther"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> . . . or what Moma didn't tell you. I was just reading and saw
    >> this: for soft, warm hamburger or hotdog buns, wet and wring a
    >> dishtowel. Wrap the rolls in it and place on a cookie sheet in the
    >> oven for about 10 minutes at 300 degrees. That just might work.
    >> I'll try it. I've also learned at my age, that a granite
    >> countertop will quickly just suck the heat out of about anything.
    >> If you want to keep a dish piping hot, don't set it on granite.
    >> We only eat 'out' once a month. That's about 89 meals to prepare
    >> at home. Any neat procedures you've learned through the years to
    >> make cooking easier/faster? Polly

    >
    > Mother always put the rolls in a paper bag, closed it and sprinkled
    > the bag with water and then put the bag in a low oven until the paper
    > was dry and the rolls were softened and warm. It works to freshen
    > stale or hard rolls as well.
    > Janet US


    You can also wrap in a damp paper towel and microwave *very* briefly, as in
    five to ten seconds briefly, no more. Too much and they get tough. Just the
    right amount and they get warm and softened.

    MartyB



  4. #24
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks


    "Pennyaline" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4f57818c$0$52263$[email protected]..
    > On 3/7/2012 8:14 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >
    >> Don't have buttermilk? Add a Tablespoonful of white vinegar to a cup of
    >> milk. Stir and let the vinegar curdle the milk. This even works with
    >> non-fat milk.

    >
    > A tablespoon of vinegar in a cup of milk? That's a hell of a lot of
    > vinegar just to make imitation buttermilk. In my experience, a teaspoonful
    > or less in a cup of milk will cause sufficient souring and curdling.
    >

    Okay, whatever! I don't use lots of buttermilk so maybe it's a tsp.
    instead. Or 1 Tbs. to 2 cups.

    >> Use 1/2 c. white vinegar plus a carafe of cold water to clean the coffee
    >> maker.

    >
    > You mean to clean the carafe itself? That's not nearly enough vinegar to
    > run a coffee maker cleaning cycle, for which half a carafe is recommended.
    >

    I don't drink a lot of coffee so I don't know about the "cleaning cycle". I
    don't think mine even has a "cleaning cycle".

    >> 2 Tbs. white vinegar + 1 tsp. baking soda + a drizzle of water makes
    >> jewelry sparkle.

    >
    > I've noticed lately that there is a warning on the labels of vinegar
    > containers to keep it away from jewelry.
    >

    I have no idea. I've got a gallon of white vinegar and I've been using this
    plus baking soda for years to clean jewelry. No problems. Maybe newfangled
    vinegar has some additives?

    >> White vinegar & water in a spray bottle makes a great window cleaner.

    >
    > If all you're doing is removing soap residues, streaks and smudges from
    > interior windows and mirrors, yes. But detergent is required to clean off
    > real dirt and grime. Vinegar and water will polish things up once the
    > grime is off.
    >

    It's great for mirrors and inside (double paned) windows. I use Windex or
    Sparkle for the outside but the touch them up with vinegar & water.

    >> Another hint: Use newspaper to clean windows. Don't ask me why, but it
    >> works.

    >
    > I've been hearing that all my life. I don't know why it works either, but
    > I do know that it's worth it to avoid the lint that comes from cloth and
    > paper towels.


    Yeah, there's no lint. Paper towels are expensive. I get tons of free
    weekly flyers in the form of newsprint. Rather than just throw them away, I
    use them to clean windows and mirrors.

    Jill


  5. #25
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks


    "Gary" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    > jmcquown wrote:
    >>
    >> "Polly Esther" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >> > We only eat 'out' once a month. That's about 89 meals to prepare at
    >> > home.

    >
    >> 89 meals in 12 months? That's not a lot of cooking. I don't eat out
    >> once a
    >> month but I still cook more meals than that. There are still 365 days in
    >> the year, aren't there?

    >
    > She was saying 89 meals to cook in ONE month...and one meal out.
    > Average 30 days in one month, 3 meals per day. 89 to cook and one to eat
    > out.
    >
    > Gary


    Thanks for clarifying. That makes a lot more sense. I don't cook three
    meals a day; I rarely eat breakfast. I honestly couldn't tell you how many
    meals I make in a month. I rarely go out to eat. I do cook enough to have
    leftovers to thaw/freeze/reheat. For this reason, I usually cook enough for
    two or three meals at one time.

    Jill


  6. #26
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks

    Polly Esther <[email protected]> wrote:
    > . . . or what Moma didn't tell you. I was just reading and saw this:
    > for soft, warm hamburger or hotdog buns, wet and wring a dishtowel. Wrap
    > the rolls in it and place on a cookie sheet in the oven for
    > about 10 minutes at 300 degrees. That just might work. I'll try it.
    > I've also learned at my age, that a granite countertop will
    > quickly just suck the heat out of about anything. If you want to
    > keep a dish piping hot, don't set it on granite.
    > We only eat 'out' once a month. That's about 89 meals to prepare
    > at home. Any neat procedures you've learned through the years to
    > make cooking easier/faster? Polly


    I keep frequently used fluids in squirt bottles, like restaurant ketchup
    bottles, but translucent rather than red, mostly 12 oz. This is a very easy
    way to store easily accessed quantities of fluids often bought in larger or
    more unwieldy containers, and the squirt top makes it very easy to apply and
    distribute as needed. After all, you seldom need a large amount of soy, or
    olive oil, which cannot be more easily accessed with a squirt from a handy
    bottle you keep standing by. And adding a bit of oil to something already in
    the pan becomes instantly easy.

    Also I like to buy frequently used ingredients in bulk so this is an easy
    way to solve the problem of how to dispense worcestershire sauce, for
    example, if you happen to have bought it in an economy or wholesale size
    jug.

    Examples: Beside the stove I have squirt bottles of olive and peanut oils,
    alongside a can of spray oil and an oil mister. So I seldom reach any
    further than stoveside for oils unless it is for outright frying.

    In the fridge, at minimum I always have squirt bottles with ketchup,
    mustard, worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, and barbecue sauce.

    MartyB



  7. #27
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks

    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Polly Esther" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> . . . or what Moma didn't tell you. I was just reading and saw
    >> this: for soft, warm hamburger or hotdog buns, wet and wring a
    >> dishtowel. Wrap the rolls in it and place on a cookie sheet in the
    >> oven for about 10 minutes at 300 degrees. That just might work.
    >> I'll try it. I've also learned at my age, that a granite
    >> countertop will quickly just suck the heat out of about anything.
    >> If you want to keep a dish piping hot, don't set it on granite.
    >> We only eat 'out' once a month. That's about 89 meals to
    >> prepare at home. Any neat procedures you've learned through the
    >> years to make cooking easier/faster? Polly

    >
    > Batch cooking. Eat one and freeze one or two. Things like soup and
    > spaghetti sauce, chili con carne, pirohy, holubky.


    I'll second that and add that it helps to keep commonly used prepared
    ingredients on hand. Like stock, I frequently keep containers of chile-ancho
    paste, green pork-chile sauce, roast red peppers, roast green chiles,
    whatever home made salad dressing I like lately, and sauces and pan gravies
    from past cooks, saved in the fridge or freezer. I never miss an opportunity
    to save and re-apply flavor in some other context.

    I intended to do that with my sausage in red beans and red chile gravy from
    last weekend, but it all got eaten already somehow. It was
    deal-with-the-devil good!

    MartyB



  8. #28
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks

    jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Polly Esther" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> . . . or what Moma didn't tell you. I was just reading and saw
    >> this: for soft, warm hamburger or hotdog buns, wet and wring a
    >> dishtowel. Wrap the rolls in it and place on a cookie sheet in the
    >> oven for about 10 minutes at 300 degrees. That just might work. I'll try
    >> it.

    >
    > Personally, I don't want soft squishy hamburger buns. I prefer mine
    > to be lightly toasted.
    >
    >> I've also learned at my age, that a granite countertop will
    >> quickly just suck the heat out of about anything. If you want to
    >> keep a dish piping hot, don't set it on granite.

    >
    > I still don't understand the fascination with granite countertops. Oh
    > sure, they're pretty. Pretty doesn't mean functional. Besides, I
    > never set pans directly on the countertop. I have mats or trivets to
    > set hot pans on.
    >> We only eat 'out' once a month. That's about 89 meals to prepare
    >> at home. Any neat procedures you've learned through the years to
    >> make cooking easier/faster? Polly

    > 89 meals in 12 months? That's not a lot of cooking. I don't eat out
    > once a month but I still cook more meals than that. There are still
    > 365 days in the year, aren't there?
    >
    > Neat Tricks:
    >
    > Don't have buttermilk? Add a Tablespoonful of white vinegar to a cup
    > of milk. Stir and let the vinegar curdle the milk. This even works
    > with non-fat milk.


    And if you have buttermilk and need creme fraiche, you can mix it half and
    half with sour cream, cover, and let it sit for a few hours or overnight.

    > Use 1/2 c. white vinegar plus a carafe of cold water to clean the
    > coffee maker.
    > 2 Tbs. white vinegar + 1 tsp. baking soda + a drizzle of water makes
    > jewelry sparkle.
    > White vinegar & water in a spray bottle makes a great window cleaner.
    > Another hint: Use newspaper to clean windows. Don't ask me why, but
    > it works.


    It doesn't work nearly as well as it used to. I learned that auto make-ready
    detailing people always used newspaper on auto glass because there was
    something in the ink that prevented streaking. And there's nothing more
    notoriously difficult to get completely clean down to the corners as
    interior auto glass.

    But now that the inks have been reformulated I don't find that it works
    nearly as well and auto detailers don't go out of their way to collect the
    newspapers from the service department waiting room any more. ;-)

    MartyB



  9. #29
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks

    On Wed, 7 Mar 2012 12:33:34 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >It doesn't work nearly as well as it used to. I learned that auto make-ready
    >detailing people always used newspaper on auto glass because there was
    >something in the ink that prevented streaking. And there's nothing more
    >notoriously difficult to get completely clean down to the corners as
    >interior auto glass.
    >
    >But now that the inks have been reformulated I don't find that it works
    >nearly as well and auto detailers don't go out of their way to collect the
    >newspapers from the service department waiting room any more. ;-)


    The inks are now soy.

    Lou

  10. #30
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks

    Polly Esther <[email protected]> wrote:
    > . . . or what Moma didn't tell you. I was just reading and saw this:
    > for soft, warm hamburger or hotdog buns, wet and wring a dishtowel. Wrap
    > the rolls in it and place on a cookie sheet in the oven for
    > about 10 minutes at 300 degrees. That just might work. I'll try it.
    > I've also learned at my age, that a granite countertop will
    > quickly just suck the heat out of about anything. If you want to
    > keep a dish piping hot, don't set it on granite.
    > We only eat 'out' once a month. That's about 89 meals to prepare
    > at home. Any neat procedures you've learned through the years to
    > make cooking easier/faster? Polly


    Learning good knife techniques amounts to a whole set of the "neat
    procedures" you seek. If you take the time to learn good knife and cutting
    techniques, and care for your knives, your prep work will go much faster.
    It's worth taking a class if you are more or less starting from scratch.
    Skills should include knife grip, chef's claw, and specific techniques for
    each defined food and styles of cut, such as julienne, dice, etc. It sounds
    simple and there is a lot of common sense involved but most of the people
    who I watch wielding kitchen knives clearly need some skills to make things
    safer, faster, and easier. The one caveat is that you have to commit to a
    lot of practice to get your techniques in line, but once learned, it's like
    the proverbial riding a bike.

    MartyB



  11. #31
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks


    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jj8930$hud$[email protected]..

    > Examples: Beside the stove I have squirt bottles of olive and peanut oils,
    > alongside a can of spray oil and an oil mister. So I seldom reach any
    > further than stoveside for oils unless it is for outright frying.


    What a good idea!!! I have squirty bottles for sauces but I hadn't thought
    of them for oil!! I decant from a gallon tubs into bottles. BUT that
    bottle dispenses far more oil than a squirty bottle would, and often far
    more than I need!

    Thanks

    O going off to find squirty bottles for her oils

    --
    http://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  12. #32
    Mike Muth Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks


    On 7-Mar-2012, "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Okay, whatever! I don't use lots of buttermilk so maybe it's a
    > tsp. instead. Or 1 Tbs. to 2 cups.


    Nope. Put 1 Tbsp of lemon juice or white vinegar in a measuring
    cup. Fill it up to the 1 cup mark. Wait 5 minutes.

    --
    Mike

  13. #33
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks

    On 3/7/2012 11:07 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >
    > "Pennyaline" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >> A tablespoon of vinegar in a cup of milk? That's a hell of a lot of
    >> vinegar just to make imitation buttermilk. In my experience, a
    >> teaspoonful or less in a cup of milk will cause sufficient souring and
    >> curdling.
    >>

    > Okay, whatever! I don't use lots of buttermilk so maybe it's a tsp.
    > instead. Or 1 Tbs. to 2 cups.


    That's more like it!



    >> You mean to clean the carafe itself? That's not nearly enough vinegar
    >> to run a coffee maker cleaning cycle, for which half a carafe is
    >> recommended.
    >>

    > I don't drink a lot of coffee so I don't know about the "cleaning
    > cycle". I don't think mine even has a "cleaning cycle".


    A cleaning cycle is anytime that you run white vinegar through the
    coffee maker itself to descale it. Some machines have an actual formal
    timed "cleaning cycle," and some don't. Mine doesn't.



    >> I've noticed lately that there is a warning on the labels of vinegar
    >> containers to keep it away from jewelry.
    >>

    > I have no idea. I've got a gallon of white vinegar and I've been using
    > this plus baking soda for years to clean jewelry. No problems. Maybe
    > newfangled vinegar has some additives?


    I've noticed the warning on containers of distilled white vinegar I've
    bought during the last year have the warning to keep it away from
    jewelry as it will simply do too much damage to it. To my knowledge,
    there's nothing newfangled about today's distilled white vinegar. It's
    more likely that people finally noticed their jewelry was being eaten away.




    >> I've been hearing that all my life. I don't know why it works either,
    >> but I do know that it's worth it to avoid the lint that comes from
    >> cloth and paper towels.

    >
    > Yeah, there's no lint. Paper towels are expensive. I get tons of free
    > weekly flyers in the form of newsprint. Rather than just throw them
    > away, I use them to clean windows and mirrors.



    The non-glossy inserts work well. Like MerryB, I've tried coffee filters
    but found that those can leave more lint than paper towels.

  14. #34
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks

    On Mar 7, 11:19*am, Pennyaline <norwegianb...@beatifulplummage.innit>
    wrote:
    > On 3/7/2012 11:07 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > "Pennyaline" <norwegianb...@beatifulplummage.innit> wrote

    >
    > >> A tablespoon of vinegar in a cup of milk? That's a hell of a lot of
    > >> vinegar just to make imitation buttermilk. In my experience, a
    > >> teaspoonful or less in a cup of milk will cause sufficient souring and
    > >> curdling.

    >
    > > Okay, whatever! I don't use lots of buttermilk so maybe it's a tsp.
    > > instead. Or 1 Tbs. to 2 cups.

    >
    > That's more like it!
    >
    > >> You mean to clean the carafe itself? That's not nearly enough vinegar
    > >> to run a coffee maker cleaning cycle, for which half a carafe is
    > >> recommended.

    >
    > > I don't drink a lot of coffee so I don't know about the "cleaning
    > > cycle". I don't think mine even has a "cleaning cycle".

    >
    > A cleaning cycle is anytime that you run white vinegar through the
    > coffee maker itself to descale it. Some machines have an actual formal
    > timed "cleaning cycle," and some don't. Mine doesn't.
    >
    > >> I've noticed lately that there is a warning on the labels of vinegar
    > >> containers to keep it away from jewelry.

    >
    > > I have no idea. I've got a gallon of white vinegar and I've been using
    > > this plus baking soda for years to clean jewelry. No problems. Maybe
    > > newfangled vinegar has some additives?

    >
    > I've noticed the warning on containers of distilled white vinegar I've
    > bought during the last year have the warning to keep it away from
    > jewelry as it will simply do too much damage to it. To my knowledge,
    > there's nothing newfangled about today's distilled white vinegar. It's
    > more likely that people finally noticed their jewelry was being eaten away.
    >
    > >> I've been hearing that all my life. I don't know why it works either,
    > >> but I do know that it's worth it to avoid the lint that comes from
    > >> cloth and paper towels.

    >
    > > Yeah, there's no lint. Paper towels are expensive. I get tons of free
    > > weekly flyers in the form of newsprint. Rather than just throw them
    > > away, I use them to clean windows and mirrors.

    >
    > The non-glossy inserts work well. Like MerryB, I've tried coffee filters
    > but found that those can leave more lint than paper towels.


    Really? I use big Bunn ones ) and have never had a lint problem...

  15. #35
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks

    On Wed, 7 Mar 2012 11:44:48 -0800 (PST), merryb <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Mar 7, 11:19*am, Pennyaline <norwegianb...@beatifulplummage.innit>
    >wrote:
    >> On 3/7/2012 11:07 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> > "Pennyaline" <norwegianb...@beatifulplummage.innit> wrote

    >>
    >> >> A tablespoon of vinegar in a cup of milk? That's a hell of a lot of
    >> >> vinegar just to make imitation buttermilk. In my experience, a
    >> >> teaspoonful or less in a cup of milk will cause sufficient souring and
    >> >> curdling.

    >>
    >> > Okay, whatever! I don't use lots of buttermilk so maybe it's a tsp.
    >> > instead. Or 1 Tbs. to 2 cups.

    >>
    >> That's more like it!
    >>
    >> >> You mean to clean the carafe itself? That's not nearly enough vinegar
    >> >> to run a coffee maker cleaning cycle, for which half a carafe is
    >> >> recommended.

    >>
    >> > I don't drink a lot of coffee so I don't know about the "cleaning
    >> > cycle". I don't think mine even has a "cleaning cycle".

    >>
    >> A cleaning cycle is anytime that you run white vinegar through the
    >> coffee maker itself to descale it. Some machines have an actual formal
    >> timed "cleaning cycle," and some don't. Mine doesn't.
    >>
    >> >> I've noticed lately that there is a warning on the labels of vinegar
    >> >> containers to keep it away from jewelry.

    >>
    >> > I have no idea. I've got a gallon of white vinegar and I've been using
    >> > this plus baking soda for years to clean jewelry. No problems. Maybe
    >> > newfangled vinegar has some additives?

    >>
    >> I've noticed the warning on containers of distilled white vinegar I've
    >> bought during the last year have the warning to keep it away from
    >> jewelry as it will simply do too much damage to it. To my knowledge,
    >> there's nothing newfangled about today's distilled white vinegar. It's
    >> more likely that people finally noticed their jewelry was being eaten away.
    >>
    >> >> I've been hearing that all my life. I don't know why it works either,
    >> >> but I do know that it's worth it to avoid the lint that comes from
    >> >> cloth and paper towels.

    >>
    >> > Yeah, there's no lint. Paper towels are expensive. I get tons of free
    >> > weekly flyers in the form of newsprint. Rather than just throw them
    >> > away, I use them to clean windows and mirrors.

    >>
    >> The non-glossy inserts work well. Like MerryB, I've tried coffee filters
    >> but found that those can leave more lint than paper towels.

    >
    >Really? I use big Bunn ones ) and have never had a lint problem...


    I use rags, wash and dry them after use and they are ready for the
    next time.. No lint. T-shirts are good. Old sheets are another good
    thing.
    Janet US

  16. #36
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks


    "Janet Bostwick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:ubffl794l5j3p29d[email protected]..
    > On Wed, 7 Mar 2012 11:44:48 -0800 (PST), merryb <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Mar 7, 11:19 am, Pennyaline <norwegianb...@beatifulplummage.innit>
    >>wrote:
    >>> On 3/7/2012 11:07 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> > "Pennyaline" <norwegianb...@beatifulplummage.innit> wrote
    >>>
    >>> >> A tablespoon of vinegar in a cup of milk? That's a hell of a lot of
    >>> >> vinegar just to make imitation buttermilk. In my experience, a
    >>> >> teaspoonful or less in a cup of milk will cause sufficient souring
    >>> >> and
    >>> >> curdling.
    >>>
    >>> > Okay, whatever! I don't use lots of buttermilk so maybe it's a tsp.
    >>> > instead. Or 1 Tbs. to 2 cups.
    >>>
    >>> That's more like it!
    >>>
    >>> >> You mean to clean the carafe itself? That's not nearly enough vinegar
    >>> >> to run a coffee maker cleaning cycle, for which half a carafe is
    >>> >> recommended.
    >>>
    >>> > I don't drink a lot of coffee so I don't know about the "cleaning
    >>> > cycle". I don't think mine even has a "cleaning cycle".
    >>>
    >>> A cleaning cycle is anytime that you run white vinegar through the
    >>> coffee maker itself to descale it. Some machines have an actual formal
    >>> timed "cleaning cycle," and some don't. Mine doesn't.
    >>>
    >>> >> I've noticed lately that there is a warning on the labels of vinegar
    >>> >> containers to keep it away from jewelry.
    >>>
    >>> > I have no idea. I've got a gallon of white vinegar and I've been using
    >>> > this plus baking soda for years to clean jewelry. No problems. Maybe
    >>> > newfangled vinegar has some additives?
    >>>
    >>> I've noticed the warning on containers of distilled white vinegar I've
    >>> bought during the last year have the warning to keep it away from
    >>> jewelry as it will simply do too much damage to it. To my knowledge,
    >>> there's nothing newfangled about today's distilled white vinegar. It's
    >>> more likely that people finally noticed their jewelry was being eaten
    >>> away.
    >>>
    >>> >> I've been hearing that all my life. I don't know why it works either,
    >>> >> but I do know that it's worth it to avoid the lint that comes from
    >>> >> cloth and paper towels.
    >>>
    >>> > Yeah, there's no lint. Paper towels are expensive. I get tons of free
    >>> > weekly flyers in the form of newsprint. Rather than just throw them
    >>> > away, I use them to clean windows and mirrors.
    >>>
    >>> The non-glossy inserts work well. Like MerryB, I've tried coffee filters
    >>> but found that those can leave more lint than paper towels.

    >>
    >>Really? I use big Bunn ones ) and have never had a lint problem...

    >
    > I use rags, wash and dry them after use and they are ready for the
    > next time.. No lint. T-shirts are good. Old sheets are another good
    > thing.


    Just what I use

    --
    http://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  17. #37
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks

    On Wed, 7 Mar 2012 13:07:31 -0500, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Pennyaline" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:4f57818c$0$52263$[email protected]. .
    >> On 3/7/2012 8:14 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >>
    >>> Don't have buttermilk? Add a Tablespoonful of white vinegar to a cup of
    >>> milk. Stir and let the vinegar curdle the milk. This even works with
    >>> non-fat milk.

    >>
    >> A tablespoon of vinegar in a cup of milk? That's a hell of a lot of
    >> vinegar just to make imitation buttermilk. In my experience, a teaspoonful
    >> or less in a cup of milk will cause sufficient souring and curdling.
    >>

    >Okay, whatever! I don't use lots of buttermilk so maybe it's a tsp.
    >instead. Or 1 Tbs. to 2 cups.
    >
    >>> Use 1/2 c. white vinegar plus a carafe of cold water to clean the coffee
    >>> maker.

    >>
    >> You mean to clean the carafe itself? That's not nearly enough vinegar to
    >> run a coffee maker cleaning cycle, for which half a carafe is recommended.
    >>

    >I don't drink a lot of coffee so I don't know about the "cleaning cycle". I
    >don't think mine even has a "cleaning cycle".
    >
    >>> 2 Tbs. white vinegar + 1 tsp. baking soda + a drizzle of water makes
    >>> jewelry sparkle.

    >>
    >> I've noticed lately that there is a warning on the labels of vinegar
    >> containers to keep it away from jewelry.
    >>

    >I have no idea. I've got a gallon of white vinegar and I've been using this
    >plus baking soda for years to clean jewelry. No problems. Maybe newfangled
    >vinegar has some additives?
    >
    >>> White vinegar & water in a spray bottle makes a great window cleaner.

    >>
    >> If all you're doing is removing soap residues, streaks and smudges from
    >> interior windows and mirrors, yes. But detergent is required to clean off
    >> real dirt and grime. Vinegar and water will polish things up once the
    >> grime is off.
    >>

    >It's great for mirrors and inside (double paned) windows. I use Windex or
    >Sparkle for the outside but the touch them up with vinegar & water.
    >
    >>> Another hint: Use newspaper to clean windows. Don't ask me why, but it
    >>> works.

    >>
    >> I've been hearing that all my life. I don't know why it works either, but
    >> I do know that it's worth it to avoid the lint that comes from cloth and
    >> paper towels.

    >
    >Yeah, there's no lint. Paper towels are expensive. I get tons of free
    >weekly flyers in the form of newsprint. Rather than just throw them away, I
    >use them to clean windows and mirrors.
    >
    >Jill


    I use white vinegar for cleaning hummingbird feeders.

  18. #38
    biig Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks


    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jj89co$joe$[email protected]..
    > Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> "Polly Esther" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> . . . or what Moma didn't tell you. I was just reading and saw
    >>> this: for soft, warm hamburger or hotdog buns, wet and wring a
    >>> dishtowel. Wrap the rolls in it and place on a cookie sheet in the
    >>> oven for about 10 minutes at 300 degrees. That just might work.
    >>> I'll try it. I've also learned at my age, that a granite
    >>> countertop will quickly just suck the heat out of about anything.
    >>> If you want to keep a dish piping hot, don't set it on granite.
    >>> We only eat 'out' once a month. That's about 89 meals to
    >>> prepare at home. Any neat procedures you've learned through the
    >>> years to make cooking easier/faster? Polly

    >>
    >> Batch cooking. Eat one and freeze one or two. Things like soup and
    >> spaghetti sauce, chili con carne, pirohy, holubky.

    >
    > I'll second that and add that it helps to keep commonly used prepared
    > ingredients on hand. Like stock, I frequently keep containers of
    > chile-ancho paste, green pork-chile sauce, roast red peppers, roast green
    > chiles, whatever home made salad dressing I like lately, and sauces and
    > pan gravies from past cooks, saved in the fridge or freezer. I never miss
    > an opportunity to save and re-apply flavor in some other context.
    >
    > I intended to do that with my sausage in red beans and red chile gravy
    > from last weekend, but it all got eaten already somehow. It was
    > deal-with-the-devil good!
    >
    > MartyB
    >

    I batch cook a lot. We have a small van camper and having prepared meals
    that just need heating is great. There are just two of us and it's nice
    even at home to just pick something out and pop it into the oven or micro.
    Meatloaf, spaghetti sauce, past dishes, shepherd's pie. soups etc. Sharon
    in Canada



  19. #39
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks


    "Mike Muth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > On 7-Mar-2012, "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Okay, whatever! I don't use lots of buttermilk so maybe it's a
    >> tsp. instead. Or 1 Tbs. to 2 cups.

    >
    > Nope. Put 1 Tbsp of lemon juice or white vinegar in a measuring
    > cup. Fill it up to the 1 cup mark. Wait 5 minutes.


    That's how I do it.



  20. #40
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Special tricks

    On 3/7/2012 5:43 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    > "Mike Muth"<[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >>
    >> On 7-Mar-2012, "jmcquown"<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Okay, whatever! I don't use lots of buttermilk so maybe it's a
    >>> tsp. instead. Or 1 Tbs. to 2 cups.

    >>
    >> Nope. Put 1 Tbsp of lemon juice or white vinegar in a measuring
    >> cup. Fill it up to the 1 cup mark. Wait 5 minutes.

    >
    > That's how I do it.
    >
    >

    I've never had any problems with 1 tabspn white vinegar to 1 cup milk.
    It even works with fat-free milk.

    --
    Jim Silverton

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.

Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32