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Thread: "Sous Vide" cooking??

  1. #1
    Theron Guest

    Default "Sous Vide" cooking??

    Has anyone tried "Sous Vide" cooking, mentioned by James Silverton in the
    post just above this one? This sounds like a wild, and probably successful
    new way to get the degree of doneness you want and retain the moisture
    content. As well the meat interior should break down and be more tender. It
    appears that you cook with the meat in a vacumn container in simmering water
    very slowly to the internal temp. you wanted. As wiith the low temp
    roasting of the eye of round I wrote about just above, I'd sear the meat
    first, and then put it into a double ziplock, suck the air out[when the Mrs.
    isn't looking], and immerse in simmering water to the internal temp. I was
    looking for.

    Has anyone tried such a technique? Take a look at this site:
    http://www.cuisinetechnology.com/pdf...ide-Basics.pdf

    Thanks for any advice and thanks to James Silverton for bringing this up.

    Ther



  2. #2
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: "Sous Vide" cooking??

    As a possibly interesting sidelight to this posting it seems that
    different newsreaders and newsposters enter things at differing
    times; for example, your post below is listed as appearing on
    Forte at 2:59 pm, but James Silverton's post to which you refer
    has yet to appear as of 3:45 pm. Just more of the fun of Usenet.

    A very good Central Florida restaurant (Luma in Winter Park) makes
    extensive use of the sous vide cooking; always soft and moist where
    it should be and very flavorful. There may be a bit of concern at
    getting the meat up to safe temperature (141 degrees) but no one is
    really worried. I believe that the meat is browned after the sous vide
    cooking to keep the crust from breaking down during the cook cycle.

    pavane


    "Theron" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:gmvank$5i8$[email protected]..
    | Has anyone tried "Sous Vide" cooking, mentioned by James Silverton in the
    | post just above this one? This sounds like a wild, and probably successful
    | new way to get the degree of doneness you want and retain the moisture
    | content. As well the meat interior should break down and be more tender. It
    | appears that you cook with the meat in a vacumn container in simmering water
    | very slowly to the internal temp. you wanted. As wiith the low temp
    | roasting of the eye of round I wrote about just above, I'd sear the meat
    | first, and then put it into a double ziplock, suck the air out[when the Mrs.
    | isn't looking], and immerse in simmering water to the internal temp. I was
    | looking for.
    |
    | Has anyone tried such a technique? Take a look at this site:
    | http://www.cuisinetechnology.com/pdf...ide-Basics.pdf
    |
    | Thanks for any advice and thanks to James Silverton for bringing this up.
    |
    | Ther
    |
    |



  3. #3
    Theron Guest

    Default Re: "Sous Vide" cooking??


    "pavane" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:c_Gkl.198115$9i5.195363@en-nntp-07.dc1.easynews[email protected]..
    > As a possibly interesting sidelight to this posting it seems that
    > different newsreaders and newsposters enter things at differing
    > times; for example, your post below is listed as appearing on
    > Forte at 2:59 pm, but James Silverton's post to which you refer
    > has yet to appear as of 3:45 pm. Just more of the fun of Usenet.
    >
    > A very good Central Florida restaurant (Luma in Winter Park) makes
    > extensive use of the sous vide cooking; always soft and moist where
    > it should be and very flavorful. There may be a bit of concern at
    > getting the meat up to safe temperature (141 degrees) but no one is
    > really worried. I believe that the meat is browned after the sous vide
    > cooking to keep the crust from breaking down during the cook cycle.
    >
    > pavane
    >
    >
    > "Theron" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:gmvank$5i8$[email protected]..
    > | Has anyone tried "Sous Vide" cooking, mentioned by James Silverton in
    > the
    > | post just above this one? This sounds like a wild, and probably
    > successful
    > | new way to get the degree of doneness you want and retain the moisture
    > | content. As well the meat interior should break down and be more tender.
    > It
    > | appears that you cook with the meat in a vacumn container in simmering
    > water
    > | very slowly to the internal temp. you wanted. As wiith the low temp
    > | roasting of the eye of round I wrote about just above, I'd sear the meat
    > | first, and then put it into a double ziplock, suck the air out[when the
    > Mrs.
    > | isn't looking], and immerse in simmering water to the internal temp. I
    > was
    > | looking for.
    > |
    > | Has anyone tried such a technique? Take a look at this site:
    > | http://www.cuisinetechnology.com/pdf...ide-Basics.pdf
    > |
    > | Thanks for any advice and thanks to James Silverton for bringing this
    > up.
    > |
    > | Ther
    > |
    > |
    >



    What dishes have you had there? It would be interesting to know what works
    and what doesn't work.

    Ther




  4. #4
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: "Sous Vide" cooking??

    On 2009-02-11, Theron <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Has anyone tried "Sous Vide" cooking, mentioned by James Silverton in the
    > post just above this one? This sounds like a wild, and probably successful
    > new way to get the degree of doneness you want and retain the moisture
    > content. As well the meat interior should break down and be more tender. It
    > appears that you cook with the meat in a vacumn container in simmering water
    > very slowly to the internal temp. you wanted.


    IOW, it's Stouffer's tv dinners. Besides, as I understand it, it requires very
    expensive equipment to do properly, in the thousands of dollars.

    I've yet to research it thoroughly, so can't speak with authority, but it
    sounds like a gimmick, to me.

    nb

  5. #5
    Vilco Guest

    Default Re: "Sous Vide" cooking??

    Theron wrote:

    > What dishes have you had there? It would be interesting to know what
    > works and what doesn't work.


    I had a duck leg cooked that way, 8 hours at 75C, and then browned in a
    skillet. Juicy and moist, crunchy on the outsides, perfect



  6. #6
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: "Sous Vide" cooking??

    Vilco wrote on Wed, 11 Feb 2009 22:58:32 +0100:

    >> What dishes have you had there? It would be interesting to
    >> know what works and what doesn't work.


    It's a bit off the topic but I will mention that I have never eaten at
    Thomas Keller's French Laundry. The food is doubtless richer than my
    cardiologist would approve (sour grapes, perhaps) and I don't have a
    concierge credit card or a secretary to make reservations for me :-(


    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  7. #7
    Robert Klute Guest

    Default Re: "Sous Vide" cooking??

    On Wed, 11 Feb 2009 21:39:12 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 2009-02-11, Theron <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Has anyone tried "Sous Vide" cooking, mentioned by James Silverton in the
    >> post just above this one? This sounds like a wild, and probably successful
    >> new way to get the degree of doneness you want and retain the moisture
    >> content. As well the meat interior should break down and be more tender. It
    >> appears that you cook with the meat in a vacumn container in simmering water
    >> very slowly to the internal temp. you wanted.

    >
    >IOW, it's Stouffer's tv dinners. Besides, as I understand it, it requires very
    >expensive equipment to do properly, in the thousands of dollars.
    >
    >I've yet to research it thoroughly, so can't speak with authority, but it
    >sounds like a gimmick, to me.
    >
    >nb


    It's all the rage. Even Thomas Keller has a cookbook out on it.

    Under Pressure: Cooking Sous Vide
    http://www.amazon.com/Under-Pressure...dp/1579653510/


    Should be doable with a food saver and a calibrated electric skillet.

  8. #8
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: "Sous Vide" cooking??


    "Theron" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:gmvg2i$2b5$[email protected]..
    |
    | "pavane" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    | news:c_Gkl.198115$[email protected]..
    | > As a possibly interesting sidelight to this posting it seems that
    | > different newsreaders and newsposters enter things at differing
    | > times; for example, your post below is listed as appearing on
    | > Forte at 2:59 pm, but James Silverton's post to which you refer
    | > has yet to appear as of 3:45 pm. Just more of the fun of Usenet.
    | >
    | > A very good Central Florida restaurant (Luma in Winter Park) makes
    | > extensive use of the sous vide cooking; always soft and moist where
    | > it should be and very flavorful. There may be a bit of concern at
    | > getting the meat up to safe temperature (141 degrees) but no one is
    | > really worried. I believe that the meat is browned after the sous vide
    | > cooking to keep the crust from breaking down during the cook cycle.
    | >
    | > pavane
    | >
    | >
    | > "Theron" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    | > news:gmvank$5i8$[email protected]..
    | > | Has anyone tried "Sous Vide" cooking, mentioned by James Silverton in
    | > the
    | > | post just above this one? This sounds like a wild, and probably
    | > successful
    | > | new way to get the degree of doneness you want and retain the moisture
    | > | content. As well the meat interior should break down and be more tender.
    | > It
    | > | appears that you cook with the meat in a vacumn container in simmering
    | > water
    | > | very slowly to the internal temp. you wanted. As wiith the low temp
    | > | roasting of the eye of round I wrote about just above, I'd sear the meat
    | > | first, and then put it into a double ziplock, suck the air out[when the
    | > Mrs.
    | > | isn't looking], and immerse in simmering water to the internal temp. I
    | > was
    | > | looking for.
    | > |
    | > | Has anyone tried such a technique? Take a look at this site:
    | > | http://www.cuisinetechnology.com/pdf...ide-Basics.pdf
    | > |
    | > | Thanks for any advice and thanks to James Silverton for bringing this
    | > up.
    | > |
    | > | Ther
    | > |
    | > |
    | >
    |
    |
    | What dishes have you had there? It would be interesting to know what works
    | and what doesn't work.
    |
    | Ther

    Primarily duck, chicken and pork. It seems to like compact pieces; ie duck breast
    or pork loin. I don't remember any beef or lamb. I would say the highest success
    rate is in the pork family, which of course is very hard to keep moist. When we
    have talked about it I get the impression that it is a work in progress as far as
    cooking applications.

    pavane



  9. #9
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: "Sous Vide" cooking??

    On 2009-02-11, Robert Klute <[email protected]> wrote:

    > It's all the rage.


    Only cuz all the cooking shows are driving a dying industry and new faces on
    the scene have become even more absurd in their quest to be the next big
    thing. Looks like this cooking technique has been around since the '70s.
    That's 30 yrs this thing has not caught on.

    > Under Pressure: Cooking Sous Vide
    > http://www.amazon.com/Under-Pressure...dp/1579653510/


    > Should be doable with a food saver and a calibrated electric skillet.


    Whatever. You wanna monitor a bag o' beef for 24 hrs to make sure you don't
    get food poisoning, knock yourself out. I wanna eat some food!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sous-vide

    nb

  10. #10
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: "Sous Vide" cooking??


    Theron wrote:
    >
    > Has anyone tried "Sous Vide" cooking, mentioned by James Silverton in the
    > post just above this one? This sounds like a wild, and probably successful
    > new way to get the degree of doneness you want and retain the moisture
    > content. As well the meat interior should break down and be more tender. It
    > appears that you cook with the meat in a vacumn container in simmering water
    > very slowly to the internal temp. you wanted. As wiith the low temp
    > roasting of the eye of round I wrote about just above, I'd sear the meat
    > first, and then put it into a double ziplock, suck the air out[when the Mrs.
    > isn't looking], and immerse in simmering water to the internal temp. I was
    > looking for.
    >
    > Has anyone tried such a technique? Take a look at this site:
    > http://www.cuisinetechnology.com/pdf...ide-Basics.pdf
    >
    > Thanks for any advice and thanks to James Silverton for bringing this up.
    >
    > Ther


    I'm more interested in cooking my food, not incubating it. If I'm going
    to invest time/effort/money in equipping for a technical cooking
    technique it will be a pressure-fryer i.e. "Broaster".

  11. #11
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: "Sous Vide" cooking??

    On Feb 11, 1:59*pm, "Theron" <oa...@rocketmail.com> wrote:
    > Has anyone tried "Sous Vide" cooking, mentioned by James Silverton in the
    > post just above this one? This sounds like a wild, and probably successful
    > new way to get the degree of doneness you want and retain the moisture
    > content. As well the meat interior should break down and be more tender. It
    > appears that you cook with the meat in a vacumn container in simmering water
    > very slowly to the internal temp. you wanted. *As wiith the low temp
    > roasting of the eye of round I wrote about just above, I'd sear the meat
    > first, and then put it into a double ziplock, suck the air out[when the Mrs.
    > isn't looking], and immerse in simmering water to the internal temp. I was
    > looking for.
    >
    > Has anyone tried such a technique? Take a look at this site:http://www.cuisinetechnology.com/pdf...ide-Basics.pdf
    >
    > Thanks for any advice and thanks to James Silverton for bringing this up.
    >
    > Ther


    They've done it for ages on Iron Chef. It's not that new. For the
    most part, it has been very successful.

    N.

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