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Thread: Sour orange substitute

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Sour orange substitute

    I came across a mention of Cuban chicken in a book I am reading,
    Tastes Like Cuba, and the author mentions that you use "sour oranges."
    One web source mentioned using orange juice mixed with lemon juice as
    a substitute. Any other suggestions? In my local store would they use
    the term sour oranges or would it go by a different name in the USA. I
    live in Pittsburgh,and do not recall seeing sour oranges for sell. The
    author also mentions that dark meat is much better to use than breasts
    since they then to be dry.

    Thanks

    Tom

  2. #2
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Sour orange substitute

    <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]...
    >I came across a mention of Cuban chicken in a book I am reading,
    > Tastes Like Cuba, and the author mentions that you use "sour oranges."
    > One web source mentioned using orange juice mixed with lemon juice as
    > a substitute. Any other suggestions? In my local store would they use
    > the term sour oranges or would it go by a different name in the USA. I
    > live in Pittsburgh,and do not recall seeing sour oranges for sell. The
    > author also mentions that dark meat is much better to use than breasts
    > since they then to be dry.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Tom


    I agree on the dark meat idea. I can't think why breasts have become so
    popular, and often when I am served them I think they are tasteless.
    You usually can find the sour orange juice in bottles at Latino shops. I
    used to buy it that way even 15 years ago. I 'd try that before fiddling
    adding lemon juice, because there's a certain bitter component you'd miss.
    --
    http://www.judithgreenwood.com



  3. #3
    George Guest

    Default Re: Sour orange substitute

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I came across a mention of Cuban chicken in a book I am reading,
    > Tastes Like Cuba, and the author mentions that you use "sour oranges."
    > One web source mentioned using orange juice mixed with lemon juice as
    > a substitute. Any other suggestions? In my local store would they use
    > the term sour oranges or would it go by a different name in the USA. I
    > live in Pittsburgh,and do not recall seeing sour oranges for sell. The
    > author also mentions that dark meat is much better to use than breasts
    > since they then to be dry.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Tom


    You might want to check the Hispanic markets in your area which will
    very likely have them. You are looking for "naranja agria" (the English
    name is Seville orange). I am also in PA and can find them in Hispanic
    markets. Sour oranges have a fairly unique taste. You can also find sour
    orange juice in such stores which won't be as good as the fresh fruit
    but certainly a good substitute.

    They are great for lots of other dishes aside from what you are trying.

    I agree with the chicken breasts. For some reason they have become
    really popular. I never buy them because I don't care for the texture
    and lack of flavor.

  4. #4
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Sour orange substitute

    On Apr 6, 5:03�am, "tomba...@city-net.com" <tomba...@city-net.com>
    wrote:
    > I came across a mention of Cuban chicken in a book I am reading,
    > Tastes Like Cuba, and the author mentions that you use "sour oranges."
    > One web source mentioned using orange juice mixed with lemon juice as
    > a substitute. Any other suggestions? In my local store would they use
    > the term sour oranges or would it go by a different name in the USA.


    Sour orange is the same as bitter orange (or Seville).

    http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/m...ur_orange.html

    Latinos typically choose lime over lemon and rarely cook with orange.


  5. #5
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Sour orange substitute

    "Giusi" wrote:
    > <tomba> says:
    > >
    > >I came across a mention of Cuban chicken in a book I am reading,
    > > Tastes Like Cuba, and the author mentions that you use "sour oranges."
    > > One web source mentioned using orange juice mixed with lemon juice as
    > > a substitute. Any other suggestions? In my local store would they use
    > > the term sour oranges or would it go by a different name in the USA. I
    > > live in Pittsburgh,and do not recall seeing sour oranges for sell. The
    > > author also mentions that dark meat is much better to use than breasts
    > > since they then to be dry.

    >
    >
    > I can't think why breasts have become so popular.


    You're not a guy.



  6. #6
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Sour orange substitute

    George wrote on Sun, 06 Apr 2008 08:56:51 -0400:

    G> [email protected] wrote:
    ??>> I came across a mention of Cuban chicken in a book I am
    ??>> reading, Tastes Like Cuba, and the author mentions that
    ??>> you use "sour oranges." One web source mentioned using
    ??>> orange juice mixed with lemon juice as a substitute. Any
    ??>> other suggestions? In my local store would they use the
    ??>> term sour oranges or would it go by a different name in
    ??>> the USA. I live in Pittsburgh,and do not recall seeing
    ??>> sour oranges for sell. The author also mentions that dark
    ??>> meat is much better to use than breasts since they then to
    ??>> be dry.
    ??>>
    ??>> Thanks
    ??>>
    ??>> Tom

    G> You might want to check the Hispanic markets in your area
    G> which will very likely have them. You are looking for
    G> "naranja agria" (the English name is Seville orange). I am
    G> also in PA and can find them in Hispanic markets. Sour
    G> oranges have a fairly unique taste. You can also find sour
    G> orange juice in such stores which won't be as good as the
    G> fresh fruit but certainly a good substitute.

    G> They are great for lots of other dishes aside from what you
    G> are trying.

    Hispanic markets are a good idea. Just in passing, real British
    Marmalade is made from Seville oranges and is quite a lot
    different from the sweet insipid jam that often passes for
    "marmalade". At least most of the makers have a few shreds of
    honesty and call their stuff "sweet orange marmalade".

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    I-mail, with obvious alterations:
    not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  7. #7
    George Guest

    Default Re: Sour orange substitute

    Sheldon wrote:
    > On Apr 6, 5:03�am, "tomba...@city-net.com" <tomba...@city-net.com>
    > wrote:
    >> I came across a mention of Cuban chicken in a book I am reading,
    >> Tastes Like Cuba, and the author mentions that you use "sour oranges."
    >> One web source mentioned using orange juice mixed with lemon juice as
    >> a substitute. Any other suggestions? In my local store would they use
    >> the term sour oranges or would it go by a different name in the USA.

    >
    > Sour orange is the same as bitter orange (or Seville).
    >
    > http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/m...ur_orange.html
    >
    > Latinos typically choose lime over lemon and rarely cook with orange.
    >


    Try telling that to anyone who makes Mojo or other dishes where it is a
    key ingredient.

  8. #8
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Sour orange substitute



    "[email protected]" wrote:

    > I came across a mention of Cuban chicken in a book I am reading,
    > Tastes Like Cuba, and the author mentions that you use "sour oranges."
    > One web source mentioned using orange juice mixed with lemon juice as
    > a substitute. Any other suggestions? In my local store would they use
    > the term sour oranges or would it go by a different name in the USA. I
    > live in Pittsburgh,and do not recall seeing sour oranges for sell. The
    > author also mentions that dark meat is much better to use than breasts
    > since they then to be dry.
    >


    How about Meyer lemons. They are a cross between a lemon and a mandarin
    orange. I bought a bag of them for the first time a few months ago
    thinking they were lemons. They are sour and have a taste of orange to
    them.



  9. #9
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Sour orange substitute

    George wrote:
    > Sheldon wrote:
    > > On Apr 6, 5:03�am, "tomba...@city-net.com" <tomba...@city-net.com>
    > > wrote:
    > >> I came across a mention of Cuban chicken in a book I am reading,
    > >> Tastes Like Cuba, and the author mentions that you use "sour oranges."
    > >> One web source mentioned using orange juice mixed with lemon juice as
    > >> a substitute. Any other suggestions? In my local store would they use
    > >> the term sour oranges or would it go by a different name in the USA.

    >
    > > Sour orange is the same as bitter orange (or Seville).

    >
    > >http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/m...ur_orange.html

    >
    > > Latinos typically choose lime over lemon and rarely cook with orange.

    >
    > Try telling that to anyone who makes Mojo or other dishes where it is a
    > key ingredient.


    You don't read well... substituting (sweet) oranges won't work, they
    don't taste anything like bitter orange. Most often even Cubans make
    mojo sauce with limes because sour oranges aren't readily available,
    plus they are overly expensive for what little juice they contain.
    Sour orange is a misnomer, they aren't sour at all, they are bitter,
    and are more often refered to as bitter orange, especially
    culinarilly.

    Latino markets sell relatively few lemons but sell a tremendous
    quantity of limes, however they are not the typical "Sunkist" type,
    instead they are small, very thin skined, are splochy with brown
    rather than bright green, and unlike the limes ordinarilly seen at the
    stupidmarket are relatively inexpensive (typically 10-15/$1) and
    contain a relatively large proportion of juice to pulp, and the juice
    is on the acrid side, reminescent of quinine. You cannot substitute
    sweet orange for sour orange (they're called sour but actually taste
    bitter)... in a bind use those cheap thick skinned grapefruit that are
    usually slightly bitter (include some of the bitter pith).


  10. #10
    Brawny Guest

    Default Re: Sour orange substitute

    On Sun, 6 Apr 2008 02:03:13 -0700 (PDT), "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I came across a mention of Cuban chicken in a book I am reading,
    >Tastes Like Cuba, and the author mentions that you use "sour oranges."
    >One web source mentioned using orange juice mixed with lemon juice as
    >a substitute. Any other suggestions?


    Steve Raichlen, "Miami Spice" author recommends: SOUR ORANGE: This
    bumpy green orange fruit wont win any beauty contests, but Cuban and
    other Hispanic cuisines would be much impoverished without it. Often
    sold by its Spanish name, nararif a agria, it looks like an orange,
    but tastes like a lime. Sour orange is a primary ingredient in Cubas
    national table sauce, mojo. Fresh lime juice makes an
    acceptable substitute.



  11. #11
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Sour orange substitute

    On Apr 6, 5:56*am, George <geo...@nospam.invalid> wrote:
    >
    > You might want to check the Hispanic markets in your area which will
    > very likely have them. You are looking for "naranja agria" (the English
    > name is Seville orange). I am also in PA and can find them in Hispanic
    > markets. Sour oranges have a fairly unique taste. You can also find sour
    > orange juice in such stores which won't be as good as the fresh fruit
    > but certainly a good substitute.
    >
    > They are great for lots of other dishes aside from what you are trying.


    When you find bottled/canned juice here's the easiest use I know for
    it. Slice a pork tenderloin into slices about half an inch thick and
    lightly pound them to flatten. Salt and pepper them and reserve.
    Heat a pan over medium heat and cook several cloves of garlic, minced,
    in butter for a couple of minutes until they begin to color and become
    very aromatic. Add the pork and cook it for about 3 minutes per side,
    depending on thickness and heat. Then pour a couple of tablespoons of
    the Seville orange juice over, turn to coat both sides, cook for about
    another minute. That's all there is to it, but don't reject it
    because it's too easy -- it's quite delicious. -aem

  12. #12
    George Guest

    Default Re: Sour orange substitute

    Sheldon wrote:
    > George wrote:
    >> Sheldon wrote:
    >>> On Apr 6, 5:03�am, "tomba...@city-net.com" <tomba...@city-net.com>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>> I came across a mention of Cuban chicken in a book I am reading,
    >>>> Tastes Like Cuba, and the author mentions that you use "sour oranges."
    >>>> One web source mentioned using orange juice mixed with lemon juice as
    >>>> a substitute. Any other suggestions? In my local store would they use
    >>>> the term sour oranges or would it go by a different name in the USA.
    >>> Sour orange is the same as bitter orange (or Seville).
    >>> http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/m...ur_orange.html
    >>> Latinos typically choose lime over lemon and rarely cook with orange.

    >> Try telling that to anyone who makes Mojo or other dishes where it is a
    >> key ingredient.

    >
    > You don't read well... substituting (sweet) oranges won't work, they
    > don't taste anything like bitter orange. Most often even Cubans make
    > mojo sauce with limes because sour oranges aren't readily available,
    > plus they are overly expensive for what little juice they contain.
    > Sour orange is a misnomer, they aren't sour at all, they are bitter,
    > and are more often refered to as bitter orange, especially
    > culinarilly.
    >
    > Latino markets sell relatively few lemons but sell a tremendous
    > quantity of limes, however they are not the typical "Sunkist" type,
    > instead they are small, very thin skined, are splochy with brown
    > rather than bright green, and unlike the limes ordinarilly seen at the
    > stupidmarket are relatively inexpensive (typically 10-15/$1) and
    > contain a relatively large proportion of juice to pulp, and the juice
    > is on the acrid side, reminescent of quinine. You cannot substitute
    > sweet orange for sour orange (they're called sour but actually taste
    > bitter)... in a bind use those cheap thick skinned grapefruit that are
    > usually slightly bitter (include some of the bitter pith).
    >

    Who said anything about sweet oranges?

  13. #13
    George Guest

    Default Re: Sour orange substitute

    James Silverton wrote:

    >
    > Hispanic markets are a good idea. Just in passing, real British
    > Marmalade is made from Seville oranges and is quite a lot different from
    > the sweet insipid jam that often passes for "marmalade". At least most
    > of the makers have a few shreds of honesty and call their stuff "sweet
    > orange marmalade".
    >
    > James Silverton
    > Potomac, Maryland
    >
    > I-mail, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


    I buy great orange marmalade made from Seville oranges at a Middle
    Eastern market. As you said it has a great taste nothing like the orange
    flavored HFCS glop you normally find.

  14. #14
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: gg Re: Sour orange substitute

    On Sun, 6 Apr 2008 12:39:29 -0700 (PDT), aem <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Apr 6, 5:56*am, George <geo...@nospam.invalid> wrote:
    >>
    >> You might want to check the Hispanic markets in your area which will
    >> very likely have them. You are looking for "naranja agria" (the English
    >> name is Seville orange). I am also in PA and can find them in Hispanic
    >> markets. Sour oranges have a fairly unique taste. You can also find sour
    >> orange juice in such stores which won't be as good as the fresh fruit
    >> but certainly a good substitute.
    >>
    >> They are great for lots of other dishes aside from what you are trying.

    >
    >When you find bottled/canned juice here's the easiest use I know for
    >it. Slice a pork tenderloin into slices about half an inch thick and
    >lightly pound them to flatten. Salt and pepper them and reserve.
    >Heat a pan over medium heat and cook several cloves of garlic, minced,
    >in butter for a couple of minutes until they begin to color and become
    >very aromatic. Add the pork and cook it for about 3 minutes per side,
    >depending on thickness and heat. Then pour a couple of tablespoons of
    >the Seville orange juice over, turn to coat both sides, cook for about
    >another minute. That's all there is to it, but don't reject it
    >because it's too easy -- it's quite delicious. -aem


    i might have to try this, aem. thanks.

    your pal,
    blake

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