Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 61

Thread: Sound familiar?

  1. #1
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Sound familiar?

    I didn't write this letter to Cook's Country:

    Many years ago, when I was throwing my first dinner party,
    I wanted to serve ham. I had forgotten the brand of ham
    my mother usually bought, and I didn't really have a clue
    how to make her candied ham, but I decided to improvise.
    I took the large ham out of the can, scraped off the jelly,
    spread mustard and brown sugar on the top, and then
    covered the top with pineapple rings. After baking it for a
    few hours, I took the ham out to serve to my hungry guests.
    It looked a little strange because all the toppings had fallen
    off the ham and into the pan. My husband soon found out
    why when he went to carve the ham. The ham was still
    encased in plastic!

    Ahem.

    nancy

  2. #2
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?

    On Thu 04 Sep 2008 06:58:30p, Nancy Young told us...

    > I didn't write this letter to Cook's Country:
    >
    > Many years ago, when I was throwing my first dinner party,
    > I wanted to serve ham. I had forgotten the brand of ham
    > my mother usually bought, and I didn't really have a clue
    > how to make her candied ham, but I decided to improvise.
    > I took the large ham out of the can, scraped off the jelly,
    > spread mustard and brown sugar on the top, and then
    > covered the top with pineapple rings. After baking it for a
    > few hours, I took the ham out to serve to my hungry guests.
    > It looked a little strange because all the toppings had fallen
    > off the ham and into the pan. My husband soon found out
    > why when he went to carve the ham. The ham was still
    > encased in plastic!
    >
    > Ahem.
    >
    > nancy
    >


    Being so well sealed, it was probably very juicy!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright

    *******************************************
    Date: Thursday, 09(IX)/04(IV)/08(MMVIII)
    *******************************************
    Countdown till Veteran's Day
    9wks 4dys 5hrs 1mins
    *******************************************
    If it looks easy, it's difficult. If
    it looks difficult, it's damn near
    impossible.

  3. #3
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?


    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote

    > On Thu 04 Sep 2008 06:58:30p, Nancy Young told us...
    >
    >> I didn't write this letter to Cook's Country:
    >>
    >> Many years ago, when I was throwing my first dinner party,
    >> I wanted to serve ham. I had forgotten the brand of ham
    >> my mother usually bought, and I didn't really have a clue
    >> how to make her candied ham, but I decided to improvise.
    >> I took the large ham out of the can, scraped off the jelly,
    >> spread mustard and brown sugar on the top, and then
    >> covered the top with pineapple rings. After baking it for a
    >> few hours, I took the ham out to serve to my hungry guests.
    >> It looked a little strange because all the toppings had fallen
    >> off the ham and into the pan. My husband soon found out
    >> why when he went to carve the ham. The ham was still
    >> encased in plastic!
    >>
    >> Ahem.


    > Being so well sealed, it was probably very juicy!


    You know, I don't really remember mine being juicy or
    tasty at all.

    nancy

  4. #4
    =?iso-8859-1?B?VEZNrg==?= Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?



    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > I didn't write this letter to Cook's Country:
    >
    > Many years ago, when I was throwing my first dinner party,
    > I wanted to serve ham. I had forgotten the brand of ham
    > my mother usually bought, and I didn't really have a clue
    > how to make her candied ham, but I decided to improvise.
    > I took the large ham out of the can, scraped off the jelly,
    > spread mustard and brown sugar on the top, and then
    > covered the top with pineapple rings. After baking it for a
    > few hours, I took the ham out to serve to my hungry guests.
    > It looked a little strange because all the toppings had fallen
    > off the ham and into the pan. My husband soon found out why when he went
    > to carve the ham. The ham was still
    > encased in plastic!
    > Ahem.



    Barbecue guru that I may be, ahem, some dozen years or so ago I bought a
    small ham and decided to smoke it.

    I removed the plastic and placed it on the smoker.

    Imagine my surprise to discover it had been cooking in a second layer of
    plastic for 4 hours.

    I didn't get much smoke ring.

    Tomorrow I'll tell the chorizo story...


    TFM®


  5. #5
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?


    "TFM®" <hillbillyboy@t[email protected]> wrote

    > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote


    >> I didn't write this letter to Cook's Country:
    >>
    >> Many years ago, when I was throwing my first dinner party,
    >> I wanted to serve ham. I had forgotten the brand of ham
    >> my mother usually bought, and I didn't really have a clue
    >> how to make her candied ham, but I decided to improvise.
    >> I took the large ham out of the can, scraped off the jelly,
    >> spread mustard and brown sugar on the top, and then
    >> covered the top with pineapple rings. After baking it for a
    >> few hours, I took the ham out to serve to my hungry guests.
    >> It looked a little strange because all the toppings had fallen
    >> off the ham and into the pan. My husband soon found out why when he went
    >> to carve the ham. The ham was still
    >> encased in plastic!
    >> Ahem.

    >
    >
    > Barbecue guru that I may be, ahem, some dozen years or so ago I bought a
    > small ham and decided to smoke it.
    >
    > I removed the plastic and placed it on the smoker.
    >
    > Imagine my surprise to discover it had been cooking in a second layer of
    > plastic for 4 hours.
    >
    > I didn't get much smoke ring.
    >
    > Tomorrow I'll tell the chorizo story...


    OMG, I've been famous in these parts for years because I
    once baked a ham in that damned plastic bag. Who knew
    it was there?? It was invisible. I glazed the thing and baked
    it. Hours later there was a little shrunken ham in a shriveled
    plastic bag.

    Now I'm finding out there are other victims of this ham
    packaging practical joke???

    nancy (will look for the chorizo story tomorrow)


  6. #6
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?

    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in news:8-
    [email protected]:

    > I didn't write this letter to Cook's Country:
    >
    > Many years ago, when I was throwing my first dinner party,
    > I wanted to serve ham. I had forgotten the brand of ham
    > my mother usually bought, and I didn't really have a clue
    > how to make her candied ham, but I decided to improvise.
    > I took the large ham out of the can, scraped off the jelly,
    > spread mustard and brown sugar on the top, and then
    > covered the top with pineapple rings. After baking it for a
    > few hours, I took the ham out to serve to my hungry guests.
    > It looked a little strange because all the toppings had fallen
    > off the ham and into the pan. My husband soon found out
    > why when he went to carve the ham. The ham was still
    > encased in plastic!
    >
    > Ahem.
    >
    > nancy


    I bet the plastic was tasty.

    --

    The beet goes on -Alan




  7. #7
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?

    Nancy Young wrote:


    >
    > OMG, I've been famous in these parts for years because I
    > once baked a ham in that damned plastic bag. Who knew
    > it was there?? It was invisible. I glazed the thing and baked
    > it. Hours later there was a little shrunken ham in a shriveled
    > plastic bag.
    >
    > Now I'm finding out there are other victims of this ham
    > packaging practical joke???
    >
    > nancy (will look for the chorizo story tomorrow)



    <grin> I'd almost forgotten about your ham. Closest I've come to
    something like that was many, many years ago when making a roast
    chicken was a big accomplishment for me. Back in those days they used
    to put the giblets, livers and neck into a little plastic baggie and
    shove it in the cavity of the chicken. Of course I didn't realize the
    baggie and its contents were still in there when I put the chicken in
    the oven.. 'nuff said.

    Luckily that practice has stopped - nowadays they sell all that stuff
    separately here - so I am sure a few newbie cooks have been saved some
    traumatic kitchen moments <veg>
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

    There is no such thing as a little garlic. ~A. Baer

  8. #8
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?

    Nancy Young said...

    > I didn't write this letter to Cook's Country:
    >
    > Many years ago, when I was throwing my first dinner party,
    > I wanted to serve ham. I had forgotten the brand of ham
    > my mother usually bought, and I didn't really have a clue
    > how to make her candied ham, but I decided to improvise.
    > I took the large ham out of the can, scraped off the jelly,
    > spread mustard and brown sugar on the top, and then
    > covered the top with pineapple rings. After baking it for a
    > few hours, I took the ham out to serve to my hungry guests.
    > It looked a little strange because all the toppings had fallen
    > off the ham and into the pan. My husband soon found out
    > why when he went to carve the ham. The ham was still
    > encased in plastic!
    >
    > Ahem.
    >
    > nancy



    nancy,

    About as bad as Mom's ham "experiment." From the big oval'd canned ham
    right onto the plate (jelly and all).

    I took one bite and quite promptly threw up all over the kitchen table.

    We never had ham since.

    Mornin'!



    Andy

  9. #9
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?


    "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> wrote

    > Nancy Young wrote:


    >> OMG, I've been famous in these parts for years because I
    >> once baked a ham in that damned plastic bag. Who knew
    >> it was there?? It was invisible. I glazed the thing and baked
    >> it. Hours later there was a little shrunken ham in a shriveled
    >> plastic bag.


    > <grin> I'd almost forgotten about your ham. Closest I've come to
    > something like that was many, many years ago when making a roast
    > chicken was a big accomplishment for me. Back in those days they used
    > to put the giblets, livers and neck into a little plastic baggie and
    > shove it in the cavity of the chicken. Of course I didn't realize the
    > baggie and its contents were still in there when I put the chicken in
    > the oven.. 'nuff said.


    Haha ... our chickens still include that lovely surprise, I don't
    know exactly how I avoided that mishap. I don't really even
    remember the first time I roasted a whole chicken.

    Don't care to pay for that at chicken prices when all I do is
    toss them ... no, I'm not making anything with them.

    > Luckily that practice has stopped - nowadays they sell all that stuff
    > separately here - so I am sure a few newbie cooks have been saved some
    > traumatic kitchen moments <veg>


    Every year we hear about the people who roast turkeys with
    the surprise stuffing.

    nancy

  10. #10
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?

    "Nancy Young" wrote:
    > I didn't write this letter to Cook's Country:
    >
    > Many years ago, when I was throwing my first dinner party,
    > I wanted to serve ham. �I had forgotten the brand of ham
    > my mother usually bought, and I didn't really have a clue
    > how to make her candied ham, but I decided to improvise.
    > I took the large ham out of the can, scraped off the jelly,
    > spread mustard and brown sugar on the top, and then
    > covered the top with pineapple rings. �After baking it for a
    > few hours, I took the ham out to serve to my hungry guests.
    > It looked a little strange because all the toppings had fallen
    > off the ham and into the pan. �My husband soon found out
    > why when he went to carve the ham. �The ham was still
    > encased in plastic!
    >
    > Ahem.
    >
    > nancy


    Ahem, what brand... and why pray tell would there be gelatin *outside*
    the plastic??? If by "Cook's Country" you mean "Cook's" brand ham
    they don't have a canned ham. http://cooksham.com/pages/products/

    I've prepared a lot of canned ham, I mean a LOT, and many different
    brands, and over many years... and I never saw a canned ham in plastic
    wrap... just open the can and it's ready to eat, doesn't really need
    to be cooked either, however I strongly recommend heating to an
    internal temperature of 160F because you have no way to know if it was
    properly refrigerated. There are similar hams wrapped in plastic (but
    no can) but those are used exclusively by delis... you can buy plastic
    packets of sliced ham, but no can. Many years ago, when canned ham
    needed a key to open, some brands had a sheet of parchment paper top
    and bottom and another wrapped around the side, to facilitate easier
    removal without getting cut on the sharp can edge... but that was like
    40-50 years ago... and there was no way anyone would miss seeing that
    parchment paper as it was pleated where it wrapped over the edge, and
    it almost always partially stuck to the can. Years ago many canned
    foods were wrapped in parchment paper and/or used parchment paper
    separators, but I've not seen any for many years now... today all cans
    are coated on the interior with a plastic film that is also non-
    stick... the old style cans were galvanized with zinc and foods would
    stick. and I never saw any canned food with a plastic wrap inside the
    can, that far back plastic films hadn't been invented yet. These days
    most canned ham is already in a plastic can, with a metal pull tab
    lid. There are some imported canned hams that still have the old
    style cans with zinc plating and open with a key, but no plastic over
    wrap; from Poland, Scandinavia, even Israel, etal., but all I've tried
    were awful, extremely salty, with a texture just slightly better than
    Alpo.


  11. #11
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?

    Sheldon wrote:
    > "Nancy Young" wrote:
    >> I didn't write this letter to Cook's Country:
    >>
    >> Many years ago, when I was throwing my first dinner party,
    >> I wanted to serve ham. �I had forgotten the brand of ham
    >> my mother usually bought, and I didn't really have a clue
    >> how to make her candied ham, but I decided to improvise.
    >> I took the large ham out of the can, scraped off the jelly,
    >> spread mustard and brown sugar on the top, and then
    >> covered the top with pineapple rings. �After baking it for a
    >> few hours, I took the ham out to serve to my hungry guests.
    >> It looked a little strange because all the toppings had fallen
    >> off the ham and into the pan. �My husband soon found out
    >> why when he went to carve the ham. �The ham was still
    >> encased in plastic!


    > Ahem, what brand... and why pray tell would there be gelatin *outside*
    > the plastic??? If by "Cook's Country" you mean "Cook's" brand ham
    > they don't have a canned ham. http://cooksham.com/pages/products/


    Cook's Country is a magazine put out by the Cook's Illustrated
    company, AKA America's Test Kitchen.

    > I've prepared a lot of canned ham, I mean a LOT, and many different
    > brands, and over many years... and I never saw a canned ham in plastic
    > wrap...


    (laugh) Understand, it happened to me, years ago. Very
    discouraging. Yes, some hams come out of the can with a
    shrink wrapped plastic bag on it. Invisible if you don't know
    it's there.

    Back then that's how I thought of ham, it came in a can with a
    key.

    nancy


  12. #12
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?

    On Sep 5, 9:13�am, "Nancy Young" <rjy...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > "ChattyCathy" <cathy1...@mailinator.com> wrote
    >
    > > Nancy Young wrote:
    > >> OMG, I've been famous in these parts for years because I
    > >> once baked a ham in that damned plastic bag. �Who knew
    > >> it was there?? �It was invisible. �I glazed the thing and baked
    > >> it. �Hours later there was a little shrunken ham in a shriveled
    > >> plastic bag.

    > > <grin> I'd almost forgotten about your ham. Closest I've come to
    > > something like that was many, many years ago when making a roast
    > > chicken was a big accomplishment for me. Back in those days they used
    > > to put the giblets, livers and neck into a little plastic baggie and
    > > shove it in the cavity of the chicken. Of course I didn't realize the
    > > baggie and its contents were still in there when I put the chicken in
    > > the oven.. 'nuff said.

    >
    > Haha ... our chickens still include that lovely surprise, I don't
    > know exactly how I avoided that mishap. �I don't really even
    > remember the first time I roasted a whole chicken.
    >
    > Don't care to pay for that at chicken prices when all I do is
    > toss them ... no, I'm not making anything with them. �


    But didn't you say you have a cat... they love the giblets... what do
    you think is in Fancy Feast. You don't have to make anything with
    them, just rinse, rough chop, and put on a saucer... a cat will suck
    them up like a Dyson. I usually toss the neck in the pan and roast it
    along with the bird... once cooked that meat shreds off easily, cats
    usually get that treat too.


  13. #13
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?

    Sheldon wrote:

    > On Sep 5, 9:13�am, "Nancy Young" <rjy...@comcast.net> wrote:
    >> "ChattyCathy" <cathy1...@mailinator.com> wrote
    >>
    >> > Nancy Young wrote:
    >> >> OMG, I've been famous in these parts for years because I
    >> >> once baked a ham in that damned plastic bag. �Who knew
    >> >> it was there?? �It was invisible. �I glazed the thing and baked
    >> >> it. �Hours later there was a little shrunken ham in a shriveled
    >> >> plastic bag.
    >> > <grin> I'd almost forgotten about your ham. Closest I've come to
    >> > something like that was many, many years ago when making a roast
    >> > chicken was a big accomplishment for me. Back in those days they
    >> > used to put the giblets, livers and neck into a little plastic
    >> > baggie and shove it in the cavity of the chicken. Of course I
    >> > didn't realize the baggie and its contents were still in there when
    >> > I put the chicken in the oven.. 'nuff said.

    >>
    >> Haha ... our chickens still include that lovely surprise, I don't
    >> know exactly how I avoided that mishap. �I don't really even
    >> remember the first time I roasted a whole chicken.
    >>
    >> Don't care to pay for that at chicken prices when all I do is
    >> toss them ... no, I'm not making anything with them. �

    >
    > But didn't you say you have a cat... they love the giblets... what do
    > you think is in Fancy Feast. You don't have to make anything with
    > them, just rinse, rough chop, and put on a saucer... a cat will suck
    > them up like a Dyson. I usually toss the neck in the pan and roast it
    > along with the bird... once cooked that meat shreds off easily, cats
    > usually get that treat too.



    Heh. Only one of our cats will eat the giblets raw - and yes, he scarfs
    them up. The other one just sniffs at them and walks off. Cats will be
    cats...
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

    There is no such thing as a little garlic. ~A. Baer

  14. #14
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?

    Nancy Young wrote:

    >
    > "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> wrote


    >
    >> <grin> I'd almost forgotten about your ham. Closest I've come to
    >> something like that was many, many years ago when making a roast
    >> chicken was a big accomplishment for me. Back in those days they used
    >> to put the giblets, livers and neck into a little plastic baggie and
    >> shove it in the cavity of the chicken. Of course I didn't realize the
    >> baggie and its contents were still in there when I put the chicken in
    >> the oven.. 'nuff said.

    >
    > Haha ... our chickens still include that lovely surprise, I don't
    > know exactly how I avoided that mishap. I don't really even
    > remember the first time I roasted a whole chicken.
    >
    > Don't care to pay for that at chicken prices when all I do is
    > toss them ... no, I'm not making anything with them.


    I love the chicken livers... but you can keep the rest. Lovely for
    chicken liver pate or just marinate them in a little olive oil, wine,
    garlic (of course - <veg>), herbs of choice - then pan fried - I often
    make a tomato sauce to go with them. But like I said, they sell them
    separately here so I buy a 'tub' that contains 500g (1lb) of them.
    >
    >> Luckily that practice has stopped - nowadays they sell all that
    >> stuff separately here - so I am sure a few newbie cooks have been
    >> saved some traumatic kitchen moments <veg>

    >
    > Every year we hear about the people who roast turkeys with
    > the surprise stuffing.
    >


    I am sure you do if they still put the baggies in there...

    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

    There is no such thing as a little garlic. ~A. Baer

  15. #15
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?

    People who have been here a while have heard this story. About 8-10
    years ago, my niece, "M", called me Thanksgiving morning, crying. She
    baked a turkey to bring to the family gathering, but the turkey did not
    look right. I drove to her house, and the turkey was upside down.

    First of all, M's mother never cooked, and M had been addicted to
    cocaine for over 10 years, so you never knew what to expect. I am happy
    to say, that after being addicted to cocaine for over 20 years, she has
    now been sober for 2 years. We never thought we would see her sober.

    BTW, the turkey tasted fine. We flipped it back over, browned it and
    nobody knew.

    Becca

  16. #16
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?

    "Nancy Young" wrote:
    > Sheldon wrote:
    > > "Nancy Young" wrote:
    > >> I didn't write this letter to Cook's Country:

    >
    > >> Many years ago, when I was throwing my first dinner party,
    > >> I wanted to serve ham. I had forgotten the brand of ham
    > >> my mother usually bought, and I didn't really have a clue
    > >> how to make her candied ham, but I decided to improvise.
    > >> I took the large ham out of the can, scraped off the jelly,
    > >> spread mustard and brown sugar on the top, and then
    > >> covered the top with pineapple rings. After baking it for a
    > >> few hours, I took the ham out to serve to my hungry guests.
    > >> It looked a little strange because all the toppings had fallen
    > >> off the ham and into the pan. My husband soon found out
    > >> why when he went to carve the ham. The ham was still
    > >> encased in plastic!

    > > Ahem, what brand... and why pray tell would there be gelatin *outside*
    > > the plastic??? �If by "Cook's Country" you mean "Cook's" brand ham
    > > they don't have a canned ham.http://cooksham.com/pages/products/

    >
    > Cook's Country is a magazine put out by the Cook's Illustrated
    > company, AKA America's Test Kitchen.
    >
    > > I've prepared a lot of canned ham, I mean a LOT, and many different
    > > brands, and over many years... and I never saw a canned ham in plastic
    > > wrap...

    >
    > (laugh) �Understand, it happened to me, years ago. �Very
    > discouraging. �Yes, some hams come out of the can with a
    > shrink wrapped plastic bag on it. �Invisible if you don't know
    > it's there.
    >
    > Back then that's how I thought of ham, it came in a can with a
    > key.


    I wish you could remember which brand. Way back then, when canned ham
    opened with that key, plastic shrink wrap hadn't been invented yet.
    It wasn't until the '60s that foods became available with plastic
    packaging, previously folks brought their own glass jars when they
    shopped because delis and such only had paper containers, and they
    charged extra for the crumby paper container, was actually a Dixie cup
    thingie, within a few hours they began to seep through, there were no
    plastic containers... butcher shops still hadn't begun selling
    prepackaged meat in styrofoam trays with cling wrap, adn all beverages
    were in glass bottles or steel cans. It wasn't until the late '50s
    that plastic film wrap began to appear in home kitchens and really
    didn't become popular until the '60s... previously folks mostly used
    waxed paper, aluminum foil was available much earlier but was too
    expensive yet for common usage... during the '50s-'60s folks washed
    and reused aluminum foil. I've been racking my brain but I can't
    come up with any canned ham where the ham was/is inside the can and
    inside a plastic shrink wrap... I've never seen that. And I still
    can't fathom why the gelatine would be between the can and the
    plastic, serves no purpose, makes no sense whatsoever... are you sure
    you're not having a flash back to a child birth nightmare... I can
    just see Nancy where her water broke, all that gelatin came gushing
    out and she gave birth to a beautiful pink eight pound canned ham in a
    plastic sack... those cans must hurt, now I know why they designed
    them with that egg shape. heheh Probably named him Armour Star Young!
    LOL

    http://www.armour-eckrich.com/hamrecipes.asp



  17. #17
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?

    Sheldon <[email protected]> wrote in news:636e1636-d405-4a01-81fd-
    [email protected]:

    > "Nancy Young" wrote:
    >> Sheldon wrote:
    >> > "Nancy Young" wrote:
    >> >> I didn't write this letter to Cook's Country:

    >>
    >> >> Many years ago, when I was throwing my first dinner party,
    >> >> I wanted to serve ham. I had forgotten the brand of ham
    >> >> my mother usually bought, and I didn't really have a clue
    >> >> how to make her candied ham, but I decided to improvise.
    >> >> I took the large ham out of the can, scraped off the jelly,
    >> >> spread mustard and brown sugar on the top, and then
    >> >> covered the top with pineapple rings. After baking it for a
    >> >> few hours, I took the ham out to serve to my hungry guests.
    >> >> It looked a little strange because all the toppings had fallen
    >> >> off the ham and into the pan. My husband soon found out
    >> >> why when he went to carve the ham. The ham was still
    >> >> encased in plastic!
    >> > Ahem, what brand... and why pray tell would there be gelatin

    *outside*
    >> > the plastic??? �If by "Cook's Country" you mean "Cook's" brand

    > ham
    >> > they don't have a canned ham.http://cooksham.com/pages/products/

    >>
    >> Cook's Country is a magazine put out by the Cook's Illustrated
    >> company, AKA America's Test Kitchen.
    >>
    >> > I've prepared a lot of canned ham, I mean a LOT, and many different
    >> > brands, and over many years... and I never saw a canned ham in

    plastic
    >> > wrap...

    >>
    >> (laugh) �Understand, it happened to me, years ago. �Very
    >> discouraging. �Yes, some hams come out of the can with a
    >> shrink wrapped plastic bag on it. �Invisible if you don't know
    >> it's there.
    >>
    >> Back then that's how I thought of ham, it came in a can with a
    >> key.

    >
    > I wish you could remember which brand. Way back then, when canned ham
    > opened with that key, plastic shrink wrap hadn't been invented yet.
    > It wasn't until the '60s that foods became available with plastic
    > packaging, previously folks brought their own glass jars when they
    > shopped because delis and such only had paper containers, and they
    > charged extra for the crumby paper container, was actually a Dixie cup
    > thingie, within a few hours they began to seep through, there were no
    > plastic containers... butcher shops still hadn't begun selling
    > prepackaged meat in styrofoam trays with cling wrap, adn all beverages
    > were in glass bottles or steel cans. It wasn't until the late '50s
    > that plastic film wrap began to appear in home kitchens and really
    > didn't become popular until the '60s... previously folks mostly used
    > waxed paper, aluminum foil was available much earlier but was too
    > expensive yet for common usage... during the '50s-'60s folks washed
    > and reused aluminum foil. I've been racking my brain but I can't
    > come up with any canned ham where the ham was/is inside the can and
    > inside a plastic shrink wrap... I've never seen that. And I still
    > can't fathom why the gelatine would be between the can and the
    > plastic, serves no purpose, makes no sense whatsoever... are you sure
    > you're not having a flash back to a child birth nightmare... I can
    > just see Nancy where her water broke, all that gelatin came gushing
    > out and she gave birth to a beautiful pink eight pound canned ham in a
    > plastic sack... those cans must hurt, now I know why they designed
    > them with that egg shape. heheh Probably named him Armour Star Young!
    > LOL
    >
    > http://www.armour-eckrich.com/hamrecipes.asp
    >
    >
    >


    You are forgetting paper products coated with wax on 1 side. The idea was
    that the wax prevented any seep through. Roasts etc were placed on the
    butcher paper in the display counter window and when purchased wrapped in
    the wax coated brown paper for you to take home. These days there the
    waxed butcher paper and also the plastic coated brown paper which is for
    freezer use.

    At my butchers today I can ask for my meat to be wrapped in either. It is
    an old meat locker plant...from the days when home freezers weren't
    readily availible and familys rented freezer space from the meat lockers.
    You could also buy whole or sections of beef or pig from these places and
    have them cut and wrap it for storage in your rented space. The place I
    frequent used to make bitchin deer sausage in the late 50's and early
    60's.

    I have seen and eaten (in the late 60's or early 70's) canned ham wrapped
    in waxed paper that was semi-transparent. These hams came in the cans with
    keys. Purchased somewhere in North Dakota in a Piggly Wiggly (possibly
    spelt wrong) on a camping trip to mount rushmore.

    Other products were sold this way ... canned bacon was canned wrapped in
    waxed paper, comes to mind.

    As to plastic wrapped hams...I haven't bought a canned ham for a looong
    time and have never seen any, that I remember.

    --

    The beet goes on -Alan




  18. #18
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?


    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote

    >On Sep 5, 9:13�am, "Nancy Young" <rjy...@comcast.net> wrote:


    >> Don't care to pay for that at chicken prices when all I do is
    >> toss them ... no, I'm not making anything with them. �


    >But didn't you say you have a cat... they love the giblets... what do
    >you think is in Fancy Feast. You don't have to make anything with
    >them, just rinse, rough chop, and put on a saucer... a cat will suck
    >them up like a Dyson.


    I wouldn't chance giving Moxie raw chicken, so I'd have to
    cook it somehow.

    > I usually toss the neck in the pan and roast it
    >along with the bird... once cooked that meat shreds off easily, cats
    >usually get that treat too.


    I used to cook the neck for my dog. Moxie, she gets some
    chicken right off my plate, the little spoiled thing.

    nancy


  19. #19
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?

    Sheldon wrote:
    > "Nancy Young" wrote:


    >> (laugh) �Understand, it happened to me, years ago. �Very
    >> discouraging. �Yes, some hams come out of the can with a
    >> shrink wrapped plastic bag on it. �Invisible if you don't know
    >> it's there.


    > I wish you could remember which brand. Way back then, when canned ham
    > opened with that key, plastic shrink wrap hadn't been invented yet.
    > It wasn't until the '60s that foods became available with plastic
    > packaging,


    Okay, I'm going to admit this happened in the 80s. Heh.
    I couldn't tell you what brand it was, whatever the store had.

    > didn't become popular until the '60s... previously folks mostly used
    > waxed paper,


    My mother saved the liner of cereal boxes, that was our
    waxed paper.

    >aluminum foil was available much earlier but was too
    > expensive yet for common usage... during the '50s-'60s folks washed
    > and reused aluminum foil.


    She did that too, and also bread bags. To this day don't go
    there, I'm not washing bags or aluminum foil.

    > I've been racking my brain but I can't
    > come up with any canned ham where the ham was/is inside the can and
    > inside a plastic shrink wrap... I've never seen that.


    It existed. Does it still today? Couldn't tell you, that was my
    first and last canned ham.

    nancy


  20. #20
    Tracy Guest

    Default Re: Sound familiar?

    Becca wrote:
    > People who have been here a while have heard this story. About 8-10
    > years ago, my niece, "M", called me Thanksgiving morning, crying. She
    > baked a turkey to bring to the family gathering, but the turkey did not
    > look right. I drove to her house, and the turkey was upside down.
    >
    > First of all, M's mother never cooked, and M had been addicted to
    > cocaine for over 10 years, so you never knew what to expect. I am happy
    > to say, that after being addicted to cocaine for over 20 years, she has
    > now been sober for 2 years. We never thought we would see her sober.
    >
    > BTW, the turkey tasted fine. We flipped it back over, browned it and
    > nobody knew.
    >
    > Becca



    My mother did that one year - I was a kid - maybe 10 but I still
    remember the fight my parents had about the turkey without any meat.
    At the time, they were both very heavy drinkers. My mother always put
    the turkey in the night before Thanksgiving - she obviously had a few
    too many when she put it in the oven.


    Tracy

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32