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Thread: Some knife-sharpening info.

  1. #1
    Jerry Avins Guest

    Default Some knife-sharpening info.

    I have a diamond-coated "steel" that works, but I prefer a stone most of
    the time. Ceramic rods are similar, but without the hand guard.

    http://www.swissknifeshop.com/cutler...ore/sharpening

    Jerry
    --
    Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.
    ŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻ ŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻ

  2. #2
    David Dyer-Bennet Guest

    Default Re: Some knife-sharpening info.

    Jerry Avins <[email protected]> writes:

    > I have a diamond-coated "steel" that works, but I prefer a stone most
    > of the time. Ceramic rods are similar, but without the hand guard.


    You still want a real steel; it does different things than your abrasive
    one. Basically, the steel straightens the edge, whereas everything else
    takes off metal to re-form the edge (at varying rates of speeds and
    degrees of precision).
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, [email protected]; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info

  3. #3
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Some knife-sharpening info.

    On 3/16/2012 5:13 PM, David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    > Jerry Avins<[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >> I have a diamond-coated "steel" that works, but I prefer a stone most
    >> of the time. Ceramic rods are similar, but without the hand guard.

    >
    > You still want a real steel; it does different things than your abrasive
    > one. Basically, the steel straightens the edge, whereas everything else
    > takes off metal to re-form the edge (at varying rates of speeds and
    > degrees of precision).


    But a steel would probably not reform the edge of a ceramic knife.
    Anyone tried?

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.

  4. #4
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Some knife-sharpening info.

    On Fri, 16 Mar 2012 17:39:37 -0400, James Silverton
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 3/16/2012 5:13 PM, David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    >> Jerry Avins<[email protected]> writes:
    >>
    >>> I have a diamond-coated "steel" that works, but I prefer a stone most
    >>> of the time. Ceramic rods are similar, but without the hand guard.

    >>
    >> You still want a real steel; it does different things than your abrasive
    >> one. Basically, the steel straightens the edge, whereas everything else
    >> takes off metal to re-form the edge (at varying rates of speeds and
    >> degrees of precision).

    >
    >But a steel would probably not reform the edge of a ceramic knife.
    >Anyone tried?


    Yes. It doesn't work. The properties of ceramic are completely
    different from steel (your alloy may vary). I gave away my ceramic
    knives, they didn't cut muster.

    I am now agnostic on knife brands but IMO harder alloys *may* keep an
    edge marginally longer but need more effort to maintain the edge. I
    don't do 440 SS any more; sharpenable but shortlived.

    There's a Japanes Knife shop just opposite one of my 'Locals'. I need
    to pluck up courage and explore it - before lunch. Could be
    educational but extremely expensive.

    Regards
    JonH

  5. #5
    Jerry Avins Guest

    Default Re: Some knife-sharpening info.

    On 3/16/2012 5:13 PM, David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    > Jerry Avins<[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >> I have a diamond-coated "steel" that works, but I prefer a stone most
    >> of the time. Ceramic rods are similar, but without the hand guard.

    >
    > You still want a real steel; it does different things than your abrasive
    > one. Basically, the steel straightens the edge, whereas everything else
    > takes off metal to re-form the edge (at varying rates of speeds and
    > degrees of precision).


    By experiment, the ridges in a steel seem to be for decoration or at
    best for tearing off pieces of the rolled edge that have torn loose. Try
    a piece of 3/8" drill rod for comparison. I see no difference. Does the
    cutlery steel's taper have any purpose at all?

    Jerry
    --
    Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.
    ŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻ ŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻ

  6. #6
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Some knife-sharpening info.

    Jerry Avins wrote:

    >> You still want a real steel; it does different things than your abrasive
    >> one. Basically, the steel straightens the edge, whereas everything else
    >> takes off metal to re-form the edge (at varying rates of speeds and
    >> degrees of precision).

    >
    >By experiment, the ridges in a steel seem to be for decoration or at
    >best for tearing off pieces of the rolled edge that have torn loose. Try
    >a piece of 3/8" drill rod for comparison. I see no difference. Does the
    >cutlery steel's taper have any purpose at all?


    You can accomplish what a steel does by using another kitchen knife.



  7. #7
    gregz Guest

    Default Re: Some knife-sharpening info.

    James Silverton <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On 3/16/2012 5:13 PM, David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    >> Jerry Avins<[email protected]> writes:
    >>
    >>> I have a diamond-coated "steel" that works, but I prefer a stone most
    >>> of the time. Ceramic rods are similar, but without the hand guard.

    >>
    >> You still want a real steel; it does different things than your abrasive
    >> one. Basically, the steel straightens the edge, whereas everything else
    >> takes off metal to re-form the edge (at varying rates of speeds and
    >> degrees of precision).

    >
    > But a steel would probably not reform the edge of a ceramic knife. Anyone tried?



    You could sharpen steel on a ceramic knife.

    Greg

  8. #8
    David Dyer-Bennet Guest

    Default Re: Some knife-sharpening info.

    James Silverton <[email protected]> writes:

    > On 3/16/2012 5:13 PM, David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    >> Jerry Avins<[email protected]> writes:
    >>
    >>> I have a diamond-coated "steel" that works, but I prefer a stone most
    >>> of the time. Ceramic rods are similar, but without the hand guard.

    >>
    >> You still want a real steel; it does different things than your abrasive
    >> one. Basically, the steel straightens the edge, whereas everything else
    >> takes off metal to re-form the edge (at varying rates of speeds and
    >> degrees of precision).

    >
    > But a steel would probably not reform the edge of a ceramic
    > knife. Anyone tried?


    My understanding is you basically don't sharpen ceramic knives; at least
    I've never tried.

    Yeah, I expect the wear mode is completely different, and a steel does
    seem likely to be irrelevant.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, [email protected]; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info

  9. #9
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Some knife-sharpening info.

    On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 10:19:17 -0500, David Dyer-Bennet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >James Silverton <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >> On 3/16/2012 5:13 PM, David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    >>> Jerry Avins<[email protected]> writes:
    >>>
    >>>> I have a diamond-coated "steel" that works, but I prefer a stone most
    >>>> of the time. Ceramic rods are similar, but without the hand guard.
    >>>
    >>> You still want a real steel; it does different things than your abrasive
    >>> one. Basically, the steel straightens the edge, whereas everything else
    >>> takes off metal to re-form the edge (at varying rates of speeds and
    >>> degrees of precision).

    >>
    >> But a steel would probably not reform the edge of a ceramic
    >> knife. Anyone tried?

    >
    >My understanding is you basically don't sharpen ceramic knives; at least
    >I've never tried.
    >
    >Yeah, I expect the wear mode is completely different, and a steel does
    >seem likely to be irrelevant.


    Ceramic knives are sharpened the same way the edge was originally
    formed, ground with a diamond dust impregnated wheel... one can touch
    up the edge at home with a diamond lapping rod.
    http://www.cdtusa.net/
    http://www.knifecenter.com/item/LSLS...rp-stick-knife

  10. #10
    RussianFoodDire Guest

    Default Re: Some knife-sharpening info.


    I prefer diamond coated steel. Diamond is considered one of the toughest
    and hard substance.




    --
    RussianFoodDire

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