Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Solar Cooking

  1. #1
    Woolstitcher Guest

    Default Solar Cooking

    Have you tried it? Did it work for you? Did you make your own or buy a
    premade one?

    Last year the kids and I made a solar oven ... while it worked, it didn't
    get hot enough IMO. The premade solar ovens are a lot of $$ so I'm
    considering making another one.

    I was just wondering if anyone else had made a solar oven and if it worked
    well for you.
    Thanks.



  2. #2
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Solar Cooking

    Woolstitcher wrote:
    > Have you tried it? Did it work for you? Did you make your own or buy a
    > premade one?
    >
    > Last year the kids and I made a solar oven ... while it worked, it didn't
    > get hot enough IMO. The premade solar ovens are a lot of $$ so I'm
    > considering making another one.
    >
    > I was just wondering if anyone else had made a solar oven and if it worked
    > well for you.
    > Thanks.
    >
    >

    I started investigating these a year or two ago. I doubted I could make
    a decent one, and, as you said, the premade ones are pricy. Now that we
    are in a heat wave, the thought has returned--along with thoughts of
    summer kitchens!

    --
    Jean B.

  3. #3
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Solar Cooking

    Woolstitcher wrote:
    > Have you tried it? Did it work for you? Did you make your own or buy a
    > premade one?
    >
    > Last year the kids and I made a solar oven ... while it worked, it didn't
    > get hot enough IMO. The premade solar ovens are a lot of $$ so I'm
    > considering making another one.
    >
    > I was just wondering if anyone else had made a solar oven and if it worked
    > well for you.
    > Thanks.
    >
    >

    I started investigating these a year or two ago. I doubted I could make
    a decent one, and, as you said, the premade ones are pricy. Now that we
    are in a heat wave, the thought has returned--along with thoughts of
    summer kitchens!

    --
    Jean B.

  4. #4
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Solar Cooking


    Woolstitcher wrote:
    >
    > Have you tried it? Did it work for you? Did you make your own or buy a
    > premade one?
    >
    > Last year the kids and I made a solar oven ... while it worked, it didn't
    > get hot enough IMO. The premade solar ovens are a lot of $$ so I'm
    > considering making another one.
    >
    > I was just wondering if anyone else had made a solar oven and if it worked
    > well for you.
    > Thanks.


    Some expertise is at: alt.energy.homepower

    I've made solar cookers years ago and may make one again now that I'm in
    sunny Texas.

    It is certainly possible to make a solar oven or cooker that gets hot
    enough, but it takes more effort and materials than most of the simple
    instructions you'll find that were designed more for classroom
    demonstration projects than for real world use.

    A parabolic collector design with a stock pot or dutch oven enclosed in
    an insulating box with the bottom exposed and at the collector's focal
    point is one of the best designs I believe. You'll get much higher heat
    levels than a lot of the other collector designs, with the drawback
    being the need to re-aim the collector periodically.

  5. #5
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Solar Cooking


    Woolstitcher wrote:
    >
    > Have you tried it? Did it work for you? Did you make your own or buy a
    > premade one?
    >
    > Last year the kids and I made a solar oven ... while it worked, it didn't
    > get hot enough IMO. The premade solar ovens are a lot of $$ so I'm
    > considering making another one.
    >
    > I was just wondering if anyone else had made a solar oven and if it worked
    > well for you.
    > Thanks.


    Some expertise is at: alt.energy.homepower

    I've made solar cookers years ago and may make one again now that I'm in
    sunny Texas.

    It is certainly possible to make a solar oven or cooker that gets hot
    enough, but it takes more effort and materials than most of the simple
    instructions you'll find that were designed more for classroom
    demonstration projects than for real world use.

    A parabolic collector design with a stock pot or dutch oven enclosed in
    an insulating box with the bottom exposed and at the collector's focal
    point is one of the best designs I believe. You'll get much higher heat
    levels than a lot of the other collector designs, with the drawback
    being the need to re-aim the collector periodically.

  6. #6
    Blinky the Shark Guest

    Default Re: Solar Cooking

    Woolstitcher wrote:

    > Have you tried it? Did it work for you? Did you make your own or buy a
    > premade one?
    >
    > Last year the kids and I made a solar oven ... while it worked, it didn't
    > get hot enough IMO. The premade solar ovens are a lot of $$ so I'm
    > considering making another one.


    Last month, I was shooting something at the local PBS affiliate here in
    Hollywood, and happened upon a solar oven one or more of the other techies
    there had made. It was set up, and the oven thermometer in the cooking
    box was showing, IIRC, 240F. Wooden box lined with metal foil, with a
    glass top. Reflectors of large pieces of corrugated cardboard from
    appliance shipping boxes lined with foil. An vertical pivot for the
    reflectors for sun tracking. Lots of gaffers tape. Some cardboard
    tubing. Voila. Oven. Later I smelled chocolate, and found some brownies
    baking in it at 270F. The cook <g> was there, and he said that yeah, that
    wasn't as hot as he'd be doing at home, but he just cooked longer.
    He/they'd also done chicken in it, and I don't know what else. I had a
    brownie before we wrapped our show.

    Two images taken with the point'n'shoot digital camera that lives in my
    car, because the best camera for you is the one you have with you:

    http://blinkynet.net/stuff/solar1.jpg

    http://blinkynet.net/stuff/solar2.jpg


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project --> http://improve-usenet.org
    Found 5/08: a free GG-blocking news *feed* --> http://usenet4all.se


  7. #7
    Blinky the Shark Guest

    Default Re: Solar Cooking

    Woolstitcher wrote:

    > Have you tried it? Did it work for you? Did you make your own or buy a
    > premade one?
    >
    > Last year the kids and I made a solar oven ... while it worked, it didn't
    > get hot enough IMO. The premade solar ovens are a lot of $$ so I'm
    > considering making another one.


    Last month, I was shooting something at the local PBS affiliate here in
    Hollywood, and happened upon a solar oven one or more of the other techies
    there had made. It was set up, and the oven thermometer in the cooking
    box was showing, IIRC, 240F. Wooden box lined with metal foil, with a
    glass top. Reflectors of large pieces of corrugated cardboard from
    appliance shipping boxes lined with foil. An vertical pivot for the
    reflectors for sun tracking. Lots of gaffers tape. Some cardboard
    tubing. Voila. Oven. Later I smelled chocolate, and found some brownies
    baking in it at 270F. The cook <g> was there, and he said that yeah, that
    wasn't as hot as he'd be doing at home, but he just cooked longer.
    He/they'd also done chicken in it, and I don't know what else. I had a
    brownie before we wrapped our show.

    Two images taken with the point'n'shoot digital camera that lives in my
    car, because the best camera for you is the one you have with you:

    http://blinkynet.net/stuff/solar1.jpg

    http://blinkynet.net/stuff/solar2.jpg


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project --> http://improve-usenet.org
    Found 5/08: a free GG-blocking news *feed* --> http://usenet4all.se


  8. #8
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Solar Cooking

    On Jun 10, 7:05*am, "Woolstitcher" <woolstitc...@aol.com> wrote:
    > Have you tried it? Did it work for you? Did you make your own or buy a
    > premade one?
    >
    > Last year the kids and I made asolaroven ... while it worked, it didn't
    > get hot enough IMO. *The premadesolarovens are a lot of $$ so I'm
    > considering making another one.
    >
    > I was just wondering if anyone else had made asolaroven and if it worked
    > well for you.
    > Thanks.


    I cook a lot with solar. I own 2 Global Sun ovens, a parabolic cooker
    and several homemade ones. The Global Sun Ovens are very good reaching
    temps of 350 F routinely....right at noon they get to 400. The
    parabolic is a lot of trouble to move around which I need to do, and
    the heating area is small, but quite hot. Of the homemade ones, the
    one that works best is the Cookit, which is made from tinfoil and
    cardboard and costs almost nothing to build. Plans are on the
    internet. Temps of 240 is max for mine, but 200 is routine. I cook
    steel cut oats, potatoes and lentils everyday. I also use the ovens to
    reheat food...quickly in the Global Sun Oven because you can preheat
    it, then just place your food inside. Black, covered cookware is
    essential. Cheap, black bowls with matching saucers, which you can
    just use as a lid are available in places like Walmart very
    inexpensively. You can buy black enamel covered pots as well. The Sun
    Oven comes with 1, and if you buy a second, you can stack 2 inside.
    The best features of the Sun Ovens is the automatic levelor, so your
    food doesn't spill as you adjust the angles. The oven can be adjusted
    to always point toward the sun. The thermopane and tight-fitting lid,
    excellent insulation, relectors, and ease of operation make the Sun
    Oven perhaps the best purchase for serious solar chefs. They cost
    about $225 including shipping. The Cookit takes longer to cook, but it
    will cook almost anything including baked potatoes. It just takes
    longer. I cook beans though in the Sun Oven because certain beans like
    Kidney beans and others have a toxin they say which requires 10 min of
    boiling (and presoaking) to get rid of. Cookit temps. often do not get
    high enough to boil them. Lentils work fine in the Cookit. With the
    Cookit, I bake 2 Med potatoes in 5 hours, but it works fine. The Sun
    Oven bakes them in about an hour. I leave my Sun Oven up and pointed
    South all day, so it stays hot at least by noon. That way I can use it
    to cook frozen dinners for my daughter or reheat something anytime,
    before about 6 PM this time of year in S. Texas. With Cookit, there is
    no hot box, so you can't preheat. Preheating is important also for
    cooking meat, since otherwise it might allow bacteria to grow while it
    is heating up. One added bonus to solar cooking is that you aren't
    heating up your house during the summer, so it helps in lowering AC
    usage a little. Drying clothes outside rather than in a dryer makes
    sense for the same reasons. It just makes me feel better to do these
    easy couple of things. dkw

  9. #9
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Solar Cooking

    On Jun 10, 7:05*am, "Woolstitcher" <woolstitc...@aol.com> wrote:
    > Have you tried it? Did it work for you? Did you make your own or buy a
    > premade one?
    >
    > Last year the kids and I made asolaroven ... while it worked, it didn't
    > get hot enough IMO. *The premadesolarovens are a lot of $$ so I'm
    > considering making another one.
    >
    > I was just wondering if anyone else had made asolaroven and if it worked
    > well for you.
    > Thanks.


    I cook a lot with solar. I own 2 Global Sun ovens, a parabolic cooker
    and several homemade ones. The Global Sun Ovens are very good reaching
    temps of 350 F routinely....right at noon they get to 400. The
    parabolic is a lot of trouble to move around which I need to do, and
    the heating area is small, but quite hot. Of the homemade ones, the
    one that works best is the Cookit, which is made from tinfoil and
    cardboard and costs almost nothing to build. Plans are on the
    internet. Temps of 240 is max for mine, but 200 is routine. I cook
    steel cut oats, potatoes and lentils everyday. I also use the ovens to
    reheat food...quickly in the Global Sun Oven because you can preheat
    it, then just place your food inside. Black, covered cookware is
    essential. Cheap, black bowls with matching saucers, which you can
    just use as a lid are available in places like Walmart very
    inexpensively. You can buy black enamel covered pots as well. The Sun
    Oven comes with 1, and if you buy a second, you can stack 2 inside.
    The best features of the Sun Ovens is the automatic levelor, so your
    food doesn't spill as you adjust the angles. The oven can be adjusted
    to always point toward the sun. The thermopane and tight-fitting lid,
    excellent insulation, relectors, and ease of operation make the Sun
    Oven perhaps the best purchase for serious solar chefs. They cost
    about $225 including shipping. The Cookit takes longer to cook, but it
    will cook almost anything including baked potatoes. It just takes
    longer. I cook beans though in the Sun Oven because certain beans like
    Kidney beans and others have a toxin they say which requires 10 min of
    boiling (and presoaking) to get rid of. Cookit temps. often do not get
    high enough to boil them. Lentils work fine in the Cookit. With the
    Cookit, I bake 2 Med potatoes in 5 hours, but it works fine. The Sun
    Oven bakes them in about an hour. I leave my Sun Oven up and pointed
    South all day, so it stays hot at least by noon. That way I can use it
    to cook frozen dinners for my daughter or reheat something anytime,
    before about 6 PM this time of year in S. Texas. With Cookit, there is
    no hot box, so you can't preheat. Preheating is important also for
    cooking meat, since otherwise it might allow bacteria to grow while it
    is heating up. One added bonus to solar cooking is that you aren't
    heating up your house during the summer, so it helps in lowering AC
    usage a little. Drying clothes outside rather than in a dryer makes
    sense for the same reasons. It just makes me feel better to do these
    easy couple of things. dkw

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32