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Thread: So, I bought a meat grinder

  1. #1
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default So, I bought a meat grinder

    An electric one, not that it matters for my question.

    There are parts that need to be kept oiled or they will rust.
    With my previous grinder I made the mistake of using vegetable
    oil. I knew it was wrong but I had to do something.

    So, before I use it to make burgers later, how do you clean
    the parts and is mineral oil a good option to keep the carbon
    steel parts from rusting?

    Any other tips? The ones I should have been paying attention
    to all these years on rfc?

    nancy

  2. #2
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder



    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:YcWzn.31910$[email protected]..
    > An electric one, not that it matters for my question.
    >
    > There are parts that need to be kept oiled or they will rust.
    > With my previous grinder I made the mistake of using vegetable
    > oil. I knew it was wrong but I had to do something.
    > So, before I use it to make burgers later, how do you clean
    > the parts and is mineral oil a good option to keep the carbon
    > steel parts from rusting?
    >
    > Any other tips? The ones I should have been paying attention to all these
    > years on rfc?


    I use a bottle brush to get material out of awkward places and stick them in
    the dishwasher. I then leave them out to dry thoroughly in the air and oil
    them with my usual light olive oil.

    I too will be interested in what others do

    --
    --
    https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  3. #3
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder

    Ophelia wrote:
    > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote


    >> There are parts that need to be kept oiled or they will rust.
    >> With my previous grinder I made the mistake of using vegetable
    >> oil. I knew it was wrong but I had to do something.
    >> So, before I use it to make burgers later, how do you clean
    >> the parts and is mineral oil a good option to keep the carbon
    >> steel parts from rusting?


    > I use a bottle brush to get material out of awkward places and stick
    > them in the dishwasher. I then leave them out to dry thoroughly in
    > the air and oil them with my usual light olive oil.


    Ah, I hadn't considered the dishwasher. After posting I saw something
    about people boiling the parts. I assumed the dishwasher would be
    a bad idea for the carbon steel. Still, how to clean all the holes in that
    plate so they're spotless? I'll look for a little brush, thanks, Ophelia!
    (smile) Scraping them out with a skewer didn't really work for me.
    hee

    nancy

  4. #4
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder

    On Apr 22, 7:27*am, "Nancy Young" <rjynly...@comcast.net> wrote:
    *Still, how to clean all the holes in that
    > plate so they're spotless? *I'll look for a little brush, thanks, Ophelia!
    > (smile) *Scraping them out with a skewer didn't really work for me.
    > hee *
    >
    > nancy


    Clean, old mascara wand. Best, free, little cleaning tool known to
    man, or at least THIS kid.

    I used to own the old crank type meatgrinder - never used it cept for
    cranberry crushing - days before miniprocessor. But the idea of
    grinding my own hamburger is sure appealing.

    Kal

  5. #5
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder

    Kalmia wrote:
    > On Apr 22, 7:27 am, "Nancy Young" <rjynly...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > Still, how to clean all the holes in that
    >> plate so they're spotless? I'll look for a little brush, thanks,
    >> Ophelia! (smile) Scraping them out with a skewer didn't really work
    >> for me.


    > Clean, old mascara wand. Best, free, little cleaning tool known to
    > man, or at least THIS kid.


    Genius!!

    > I used to own the old crank type meatgrinder - never used it cept for
    > cranberry crushing - days before miniprocessor.


    I had one, it was a hassle for me, finding a surface to attach it to,
    even then it would move around.

    > But the idea of grinding my own hamburger is sure appealing.


    Yeah, it seems like a better idea every time I turn on the news,
    it seems, sometimes.

    Thanks for the brush idea!

    nancy

  6. #6
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder


    Nancy Young wrote:
    >
    > An electric one, not that it matters for my question.
    >
    > There are parts that need to be kept oiled or they will rust.
    > With my previous grinder I made the mistake of using vegetable
    > oil. I knew it was wrong but I had to do something.
    >
    > So, before I use it to make burgers later, how do you clean
    > the parts and is mineral oil a good option to keep the carbon
    > steel parts from rusting?
    >
    > Any other tips? The ones I should have been paying attention
    > to all these years on rfc?
    >
    > nancy


    I hand wash my KA grinder attachment. The CS parts, basically the cutter
    blade and hole plate have never been a problem to clean by hand and no
    brush has ever been needed for the hole plate. When you wash it out
    shortly after use the gook washes out just fine under running water. I
    also never oil those parts either, I just shake off most of the water
    and then let them air dry. No rust anywhere. The whole cleaning process
    only takes 5 or 6 minutes.

  7. #7
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder

    I forget who to credit for this bit of magic...

    The last thing to go through the meat grinder should be a couple slices of
    bread. They'll suck up a wealth of fat/grease, making cleaning parts much
    easier, especially the grind plates.

    Andy

  8. #8
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder



    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:3pWzn.32047$[email protected]..
    > Ophelia wrote:
    >> "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote

    >
    >>> There are parts that need to be kept oiled or they will rust.
    >>> With my previous grinder I made the mistake of using vegetable
    >>> oil. I knew it was wrong but I had to do something.
    >>> So, before I use it to make burgers later, how do you clean
    >>> the parts and is mineral oil a good option to keep the carbon
    >>> steel parts from rusting?

    >
    >> I use a bottle brush to get material out of awkward places and stick
    >> them in the dishwasher. I then leave them out to dry thoroughly in
    >> the air and oil them with my usual light olive oil.

    >
    > Ah, I hadn't considered the dishwasher. After posting I saw something
    > about people boiling the parts. I assumed the dishwasher would be
    > a bad idea for the carbon steel. Still, how to clean all the holes in
    > that
    > plate so they're spotless? I'll look for a little brush, thanks, Ophelia!
    > (smile) Scraping them out with a skewer didn't really work for me.
    > hee


    This is the brush I use. It is quite narrow:

    http://www.boots.com/en/Boots-Bottle...Teat%20Cleaner

    http://tinyurl.com/236ouuy

    When stuff comes out of my dishwasher, it is fairly dry and it is important
    to ensure it really is dry.




    --
    --
    https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  9. #9
    Janet Baraclough Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder

    The message <YcWzn.31910$[email protected]>
    from "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > An electric one, not that it matters for my question.


    > There are parts that need to be kept oiled or they will rust.
    > With my previous grinder I made the mistake of using vegetable
    > oil. I knew it was wrong but I had to do something.


    > So, before I use it to make burgers later, how do you clean
    > the parts and is mineral oil a good option to keep the carbon
    > steel parts from rusting?


    If its anything like my home meat-grinder, or the one i used at work
    in a butchers, take the whole thing apart for cleaning
    and brush-scrubbing of all meat-contact parts in hot soapy water.

    Not all mineral oils are suitable for food contact; check the label.

    > Any other tips? The ones I should have been paying attention
    > to all these years on rfc?


    "Buy stainless steel", perhaps :-)

    Janet.

  10. #10
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder



    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:U4Xzn.310586$[email protected]..
    > Kalmia wrote:
    >> On Apr 22, 7:27 am, "Nancy Young" <rjynly...@comcast.net> wrote:
    >> Still, how to clean all the holes in that
    >>> plate so they're spotless? I'll look for a little brush, thanks,
    >>> Ophelia! (smile) Scraping them out with a skewer didn't really work
    >>> for me.

    >
    >> Clean, old mascara wand. Best, free, little cleaning tool known to
    >> man, or at least THIS kid.

    >
    > Genius!!
    >
    >> I used to own the old crank type meatgrinder - never used it cept for
    >> cranberry crushing - days before miniprocessor.

    >
    > I had one, it was a hassle for me, finding a surface to attach it to,
    > even then it would move around.
    >> But the idea of grinding my own hamburger is sure appealing.

    >
    > Yeah, it seems like a better idea every time I turn on the news,
    > it seems, sometimes.
    > Thanks for the brush idea!


    Be careful using a small brush. The inside of the machine is sharp, at
    least one of mine is. I scraped myself quite badly on the first one I had,
    so now I use one with a handle.

    --
    --
    https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  11. #11
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder

    "Nancy Young" wrote:
    >
    >An electric one, not that it matters for my question.
    >
    >There are parts that need to be kept oiled or they will rust.
    >With my previous grinder I made the mistake of using vegetable
    >oil. I knew it was wrong but I had to do something.
    >
    >So, before I use it to make burgers later, how do you clean
    >the parts and is mineral oil a good option to keep the carbon
    >steel parts from rusting?
    >
    >Any other tips? The ones I should have been paying attention
    >to all these years on rfc?


    Nothing wrong with vegetable oil on the carbon steel plate/blade. I
    don't bother oiling those parts, just be sure all parts are dry/clean
    before reassembling/storing. The easiest way to clear meat, wet/oily
    ingredients from the plate and other parts is at the end to pass
    through a hunk of dry bread/a few saltines (often that can be used in
    a recipe anyway - meataballes, meataloaf). Then simply hand wash all
    parts in ordinary dishwashing liquid... never place aluminum in
    dishwasher. For the obsessive compulsives every hardware store sells
    small diameter wire brushes of stainless steel/brass for passing
    through grinder plate holes... but a short soak in hot soapy water and
    a good rinse has always worked well for me. There are special food
    safe silicone greases for long term storage but if you use your
    grinder regularly those parts won't rust in the typical home kitchen.
    I have extra carbon steel plates/blades sitting in my pantry
    unused/unoiled for many years and not a speck of rust... I have a
    second grinder that hasn't been used in a few years and no rust. Of
    course a lot depends on your climate and the humidity in your home.





  12. #12
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder


    Andy wrote:
    >
    > I forget who to credit for this bit of magic...
    >
    > The last thing to go through the meat grinder should be a couple slices of
    > bread. They'll suck up a wealth of fat/grease, making cleaning parts much
    > easier, especially the grind plates.
    >
    > Andy


    The bread will also push the last ounce of meat out of the grinder, and
    if you're making meat loaf or something that gets bread crumbs anyway,
    you have a start on that as well.

  13. #13
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder



    "brooklyn1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > "Nancy Young" wrote:
    >>
    >>An electric one, not that it matters for my question.
    >>
    >>There are parts that need to be kept oiled or they will rust.
    >>With my previous grinder I made the mistake of using vegetable
    >>oil. I knew it was wrong but I had to do something.
    >>
    >>So, before I use it to make burgers later, how do you clean
    >>the parts and is mineral oil a good option to keep the carbon
    >>steel parts from rusting?
    >>
    >>Any other tips? The ones I should have been paying attention
    >>to all these years on rfc?

    >
    > Nothing wrong with vegetable oil on the carbon steel plate/blade. I
    > don't bother oiling those parts, just be sure all parts are dry/clean
    > before reassembling/storing. The easiest way to clear meat, wet/oily
    > ingredients from the plate and other parts is at the end to pass
    > through a hunk of dry bread/a few saltines (often that can be used in
    > a recipe anyway - meataballes, meataloaf). Then simply hand wash all
    > parts in ordinary dishwashing liquid... never place aluminum in
    > dishwasher. For the obsessive compulsives every hardware store sells
    > small diameter wire brushes of stainless steel/brass for passing
    > through grinder plate holes... but a short soak in hot soapy water and
    > a good rinse has always worked well for me. There are special food
    > safe silicone greases for long term storage but if you use your
    > grinder regularly those parts won't rust in the typical home kitchen.
    > I have extra carbon steel plates/blades sitting in my pantry
    > unused/unoiled for many years and not a speck of rust... I have a
    > second grinder that hasn't been used in a few years and no rust. Of
    > course a lot depends on your climate and the humidity in your home.


    I have two grinders, one I manage just in the way you suggest, the other in
    the way I described. The former seems better quality and doesn't cut the
    hands as you clean it.
    --
    --
    https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  14. #14
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder

    Pete C. wrote:
    > Nancy Young wrote:


    >> So, before I use it to make burgers later, how do you clean
    >> the parts and is mineral oil a good option to keep the carbon
    >> steel parts from rusting?


    > I hand wash my KA grinder attachment. The CS parts, basically the
    > cutter blade and hole plate have never been a problem to clean by
    > hand and no brush has ever been needed for the hole plate. When you
    > wash it out shortly after use the gook washes out just fine under
    > running water.


    It just didn't work out that way for me. Perhaps because I have
    only used the grinder for pork? That stuff was in there good.
    Certainly impervious to rinsing.

    > I also never oil those parts either, I just shake off
    > most of the water and then let them air dry. No rust anywhere. The
    > whole cleaning process only takes 5 or 6 minutes.


    Interesting. I found the blade thingy (technical meat grinder term)
    had some rust-like action even with the oil.

    Thanks for the advice. I'd certainly like to just wash it and be done
    with it.

    nancy

  15. #15
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder

    Janet Baraclough wrote:

    > from "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> contains these words:
    >
    >> An electric one, not that it matters for my question.

    >
    >> There are parts that need to be kept oiled or they will rust.
    >> With my previous grinder I made the mistake of using vegetable
    >> oil. I knew it was wrong but I had to do something.


    > If its anything like my home meat-grinder, or the one i used at work
    > in a butchers, take the whole thing apart for cleaning
    > and brush-scrubbing of all meat-contact parts in hot soapy water.


    Yes, I know to take it apart. It really would be a bitch to clean
    otherwise.
    >
    > Not all mineral oils are suitable for food contact; check the label.


    Thanks, I have some that I use for cutting boards/etc.

    >> Any other tips? The ones I should have been paying attention
    >> to all these years on rfc?

    >
    > "Buy stainless steel", perhaps :-)


    I never saw that! Heh.

    nancy

  16. #16
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder

    Andy wrote:
    > I forget who to credit for this bit of magic...
    >
    > The last thing to go through the meat grinder should be a couple
    > slices of bread. They'll suck up a wealth of fat/grease, making
    > cleaning parts much easier, especially the grind plates.


    Great, thanks. That should help.

    nancy

  17. #17
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder

    brooklyn1 wrote:
    > "Nancy Young" wrote:


    >> There are parts that need to be kept oiled or they will rust.
    >> With my previous grinder I made the mistake of using vegetable
    >> oil. I knew it was wrong but I had to do something.


    > Nothing wrong with vegetable oil on the carbon steel plate/blade.


    You know, it got gunky. I thought it might, and I wasn't disappointed.

    > I
    > don't bother oiling those parts, just be sure all parts are dry/clean
    > before reassembling/storing. The easiest way to clear meat, wet/oily
    > ingredients from the plate and other parts is at the end to pass
    > through a hunk of dry bread/a few saltines (often that can be used in
    > a recipe anyway - meataballes, meataloaf). Then simply hand wash all
    > parts in ordinary dishwashing liquid... never place aluminum in
    > dishwasher. For the obsessive compulsives every hardware store sells
    > small diameter wire brushes of stainless steel/brass for passing
    > through grinder plate holes... but a short soak in hot soapy water and
    > a good rinse has always worked well for me. There are special food
    > safe silicone greases for long term storage but if you use your
    > grinder regularly those parts won't rust in the typical home kitchen.
    > I have extra carbon steel plates/blades sitting in my pantry
    > unused/unoiled for many years and not a speck of rust... I have a
    > second grinder that hasn't been used in a few years and no rust. Of
    > course a lot depends on your climate and the humidity in your home.


    Okay, I appreciate the advice. Push comes to shove, I'm sure I could
    just order a new plate.

    nancy

  18. #18
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder

    "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > Andy wrote:
    >>
    >> I forget who to credit for this bit of magic...
    >>
    >> The last thing to go through the meat grinder should be a couple
    >> slices of bread. They'll suck up a wealth of fat/grease, making
    >> cleaning parts much easier, especially the grind plates.
    >>
    >> Andy

    >
    > The bread will also push the last ounce of meat out of the grinder,
    > and if you're making meat loaf or something that gets bread crumbs
    > anyway, you have a start on that as well.



    Pete C,

    I wondered about maybe pan frying the bread in it's newfound greasy
    "wonderfulness" into something. Maybe mixed in with the fresh ground meat
    and eggs.

    Best,

    Andy


  19. #19
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder

    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Andy wrote:
    >> I forget who to credit for this bit of magic...
    >>
    >> The last thing to go through the meat grinder should be a couple
    >> slices of bread. They'll suck up a wealth of fat/grease, making
    >> cleaning parts much easier, especially the grind plates.

    >
    > Great, thanks. That should help.
    >
    > nancy



    Welcome!

    Andy

  20. #20
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: So, I bought a meat grinder

    Nancy Young wrote:
    > brooklyn1 wrote:
    >> "Nancy Young" wrote:

    >
    >>> There are parts that need to be kept oiled or they will rust.
    >>> With my previous grinder I made the mistake of using vegetable
    >>> oil. I knew it was wrong but I had to do something.

    >
    >> Nothing wrong with vegetable oil on the carbon steel plate/blade.

    >
    > You know, it got gunky. I thought it might, and I wasn't disappointed.
    >
    >> I
    >> don't bother oiling those parts, just be sure all parts are dry/clean
    >> before reassembling/storing. The easiest way to clear meat, wet/oily
    >> ingredients from the plate and other parts is at the end to pass
    >> through a hunk of dry bread/a few saltines (often that can be used in
    >> a recipe anyway - meataballes, meataloaf). Then simply hand wash all
    >> parts in ordinary dishwashing liquid... never place aluminum in
    >> dishwasher. For the obsessive compulsives every hardware store sells
    >> small diameter wire brushes of stainless steel/brass for passing
    >> through grinder plate holes... but a short soak in hot soapy water and
    >> a good rinse has always worked well for me. There are special food
    >> safe silicone greases for long term storage but if you use your
    >> grinder regularly those parts won't rust in the typical home kitchen.
    >> I have extra carbon steel plates/blades sitting in my pantry
    >> unused/unoiled for many years and not a speck of rust... I have a
    >> second grinder that hasn't been used in a few years and no rust. Of
    >> course a lot depends on your climate and the humidity in your home.

    >
    > Okay, I appreciate the advice. Push comes to shove, I'm sure I could
    > just order a new plate.
    > nancy



    Use oven cleaner on the gunked-up steel (from the vegetable oil.) DO
    NOT get any oven cleaner on aluminum. It will take it right off.

    I just store my grinder knives and plates in a drawer, not installed
    in the grinder. I wash them with HOT water, dry, and put them away
    without any oil coating. I have some that are over 30 years old and
    they are fine (discolored a bit, like a carbon steel kitchen knife) HTH

    Bob

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