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Thread: Smoking meat overnight

  1. #1
    George Leppla Guest

    Default Smoking meat overnight

    Loaded the Bradley smoker late yesterday afternoon with a 14 pound
    brisket and two pork shoulders. A little over 30 pounds of meat.
    Fourteen hours in the smoker at 200 degrees... smoke during the first 5.
    We'll let it cool, cut off enough for tonight's dinner and put the
    rest in the refrigerator. Tomorrow we'll run everything through the
    slicer and pack one pound portions in freezer bags. This will last us
    about 4 to 5 months or so.

    George L

  2. #2
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Smoking meat overnight

    George Leppla <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Loaded the Bradley smoker late yesterday afternoon with a
    > 14 pound brisket and two pork shoulders. A little over 30
    > pounds of meat. Fourteen hours in the smoker at 200
    > degrees... smoke during the first 5.
    > We'll let it cool, cut off enough for tonight's dinner
    > and put the
    > rest in the refrigerator. Tomorrow we'll run everything
    > through the slicer and pack one pound portions in freezer
    > bags. This will last us about 4 to 5 months or so.
    >
    > George L




    George L.,

    Any burnt ends for Andy?

    Have time, will travel. <VBG>

    Ya BUM!!!

    Hi Becca! [Waving!]

    Best,

    Andy



  3. #3
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Smoking meat overnight

    On Sep 9, 4:51*am, George Leppla <geo...@cruisemaster.com> wrote:
    > Loaded the Bradley smoker late yesterday afternoon with a 14 pound
    > brisket and two pork shoulders. *A little over 30 pounds of meat.
    > Fourteen hours in the smoker at 200 degrees... smoke during the first 5.
    > * We'll let it cool, cut off enough for tonight's dinner and put the
    > rest in the refrigerator. *Tomorrow we'll run everything through the
    > slicer and pack one pound portions in freezer bags. *This will last us
    > about 4 to 5 months or so.


    How do you reheat it to retain quality? Or do you eat it cold?


  4. #4
    George Leppla Guest

    Default Re: Smoking meat overnight

    On 9/9/2012 1:05 PM, spamtrap1888 wrote:
    > On Sep 9, 4:51 am, George Leppla <geo...@cruisemaster.com> wrote:
    >> Loaded the Bradley smoker late yesterday afternoon with a 14 pound
    >> brisket and two pork shoulders. A little over 30 pounds of meat.
    >> Fourteen hours in the smoker at 200 degrees... smoke during the first 5.
    >> We'll let it cool, cut off enough for tonight's dinner and put the
    >> rest in the refrigerator. Tomorrow we'll run everything through the
    >> slicer and pack one pound portions in freezer bags. This will last us
    >> about 4 to 5 months or so.

    >
    > How do you reheat it to retain quality? Or do you eat it cold?
    >


    We seldom eat the meat plain or cold. We shred it and heat with a small
    amount of BBQ sauce for sandwiches, we add it to soups, we make fajitas
    (heating it with the onions and peppers), enchiladas, pulled pork
    sandwiches. We have added it to Pad Thai, stir frys, used it in making
    spring rolls, Pho and Vietnamese noodle salads.

    Both the pork and beef are very versatile.

    George L

  5. #5
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Smoking meat overnight

    On Sun, 9 Sep 2012 11:05:02 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sep 9, 4:51*am, George Leppla <geo...@cruisemaster.com> wrote:
    >> Loaded the Bradley smoker late yesterday afternoon with a 14 pound
    >> brisket and two pork shoulders. *A little over 30 pounds of meat.
    >> Fourteen hours in the smoker at 200 degrees... smoke during the first 5.
    >> * We'll let it cool, cut off enough for tonight's dinner and put the
    >> rest in the refrigerator. *Tomorrow we'll run everything through the
    >> slicer and pack one pound portions in freezer bags. *This will last us
    >> about 4 to 5 months or so.

    >
    >How do you reheat it to retain quality? Or do you eat it cold?



    I freeze bbq too. I reheat it in the microwave on a low or medium
    setting. It can be excellent done that way. Nothing like a good
    pulled pork or brisket dinner when thee is two feet of snow on the
    deck in February.

  6. #6
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Smoking meat overnight

    On Sun, 9 Sep 2012 11:05:02 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sep 9, 4:51*am, George Leppla <geo...@cruisemaster.com> wrote:
    >> Loaded the Bradley smoker late yesterday afternoon with a 14 pound
    >> brisket and two pork shoulders. *A little over 30 pounds of meat.
    >> Fourteen hours in the smoker at 200 degrees... smoke during the first 5.
    >> * We'll let it cool, cut off enough for tonight's dinner and put the
    >> rest in the refrigerator. *Tomorrow we'll run everything through the
    >> slicer and pack one pound portions in freezer bags. *

    >
    >How do you reheat it to retain quality? Or do you eat it cold?


    It's all sliced so it's pretty easy to reheat by several methods, and
    obviously wouldn't be heated to cooking temperature. Delis keep such
    meats heated all day with a low temperature steam cabinet... one can
    make their own at home with one of those covered oval roasters.
    Defrost the meat in the fridge, place a stack of meat slices on a rack
    covered with foil in the pan, add a little hot water under the rack
    (about a cup), cover and place into a 190 oven for 30 minutes. Can
    be done on the stove top too but one would need to keep a keen eye not
    to warm too rapidly and/or over heat. How to heat depends a lot on
    how it will be eaten... for sandwiches it should be heated to like
    150 That's probably 2-3 days worth for George and his wife. hehe

  7. #7
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Smoking meat overnight

    On 9/9/2012 2:12 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    > On Sun, 9 Sep 2012 11:05:02 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sep 9, 4:51 am, George Leppla <geo...@cruisemaster.com> wrote:
    >>> Loaded the Bradley smoker late yesterday afternoon with a 14 pound
    >>> brisket and two pork shoulders. A little over 30 pounds of meat.
    >>> Fourteen hours in the smoker at 200 degrees... smoke during the first 5.
    >>> We'll let it cool, cut off enough for tonight's dinner and put the
    >>> rest in the refrigerator. Tomorrow we'll run everything through the
    >>> slicer and pack one pound portions in freezer bags. This will last us
    >>> about 4 to 5 months or so.

    >>
    >> How do you reheat it to retain quality? Or do you eat it cold?

    >
    >
    > I freeze bbq too. I reheat it in the microwave on a low or medium
    > setting. It can be excellent done that way. Nothing like a good
    > pulled pork or brisket dinner when thee is two feet of snow on the
    > deck in February.
    >


    I freeze barbecue in those zip lock vacuum bags. I heat the bags in a
    pot of boiling water. It's the best way I've found to keep the meat juicy.

    I'll sometimes make tacos or enchilladas with the meat.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  8. #8
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Smoking meat overnight


    Janet Wilder wrote:
    >
    > On 9/9/2012 2:12 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    > > On Sun, 9 Sep 2012 11:05:02 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> On Sep 9, 4:51 am, George Leppla <geo...@cruisemaster.com> wrote:
    > >>> Loaded the Bradley smoker late yesterday afternoon with a 14 pound
    > >>> brisket and two pork shoulders. A little over 30 pounds of meat.
    > >>> Fourteen hours in the smoker at 200 degrees... smoke during the first 5.
    > >>> We'll let it cool, cut off enough for tonight's dinner and put the
    > >>> rest in the refrigerator. Tomorrow we'll run everything through the
    > >>> slicer and pack one pound portions in freezer bags. This will last us
    > >>> about 4 to 5 months or so.
    > >>
    > >> How do you reheat it to retain quality? Or do you eat it cold?

    > >
    > >
    > > I freeze bbq too. I reheat it in the microwave on a low or medium
    > > setting. It can be excellent done that way. Nothing like a good
    > > pulled pork or brisket dinner when thee is two feet of snow on the
    > > deck in February.
    > >

    >
    > I freeze barbecue in those zip lock vacuum bags. I heat the bags in a
    > pot of boiling water. It's the best way I've found to keep the meat juicy.
    >
    > I'll sometimes make tacos or enchilladas with the meat.
    >
    > --
    > Janet Wilder
    > Way-the-heck-south Texas
    > Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.


    I like bbq chili-mac in the winter months, so I'll get a pot of water
    boiling for the mac, put a frozen foodsaver bag of bbq brisket in to
    thaw, then get the mac going while I chop and make the bbq chili part in
    another pot. Total time start to finish is perhaps 20min with the time
    for the water to boil.

  9. #9
    George Leppla Guest

    Default Re: Smoking meat overnight

    On 9/10/2012 8:23 AM, Pete C. wrote:
    >
    > Janet Wilder wrote:
    >>


    >>
    >> I freeze barbecue in those zip lock vacuum bags. I heat the bags in a
    >> pot of boiling water. It's the best way I've found to keep the meat juicy.
    >>
    >> I'll sometimes make tacos or enchilladas with the meat.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Janet Wilder
    >> Way-the-heck-south Texas
    >> Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

    >
    > I like bbq chili-mac in the winter months, so I'll get a pot of water
    > boiling for the mac, put a frozen foodsaver bag of bbq brisket in to
    > thaw, then get the mac going while I chop and make the bbq chili part in
    > another pot. Total time start to finish is perhaps 20min with the time
    > for the water to boil.
    >


    We sliced the meat this morning. 16 pounds of shoulder yielded 10
    pounds of smoked meat. We bought the pork for 99 cents a pound, so cost
    per pound of finished product is $1.60

    The yield on the brisket wasn't as good. 14 pound brisket was $1.38 pp.
    After trimming and smoking, we ended up with almost 8 pounds of meat.
    Cost per pound is $2.42

    Both pork and beef came out very well.... tender and juicy. I think we
    are having enchiladas for supper tonight.

    George L

  10. #10
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Smoking meat overnight

    George Leppla <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On 9/10/2012 8:23 AM, Pete C. wrote:
    >>
    >> Janet Wilder wrote:
    >>>

    >
    >>>
    >>> I freeze barbecue in those zip lock vacuum bags. I heat the bags in
    >>> a pot of boiling water. It's the best way I've found to keep the
    >>> meat juicy. I'll sometimes make tacos or enchilladas with the meat.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Janet Wilder
    >>> Way-the-heck-south Texas
    >>> Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

    >>
    >> I like bbq chili-mac in the winter months, so I'll get a pot of water
    >> boiling for the mac, put a frozen foodsaver bag of bbq brisket in to
    >> thaw, then get the mac going while I chop and make the bbq chili
    >> part in another pot. Total time start to finish is perhaps 20min
    >> with the time for the water to boil.
    >>

    >
    > We sliced the meat this morning. 16 pounds of shoulder yielded 10
    > pounds of smoked meat. We bought the pork for 99 cents a pound, so
    > cost per pound of finished product is $1.60


    There must be an awful lot of unrendered fat left in that meat, because when
    fully cooked and rendered, no pork butt or shoulder should yields over 50
    percent usable cooked weight. In fact, if well trimmed and defatted after
    cooking, it can be as low as 35 percent.

    >
    > The yield on the brisket wasn't as good. 14 pound brisket was $1.38
    > pp. After trimming and smoking, we ended up with almost 8 pounds of
    > meat. Cost per pound is $2.42


    Again, lots of retained fat. But then I like some retained fat cap on sliced
    brisket and I want enough fat left in the point to reheat it without it
    getting overcooked. A whole packer cut will rarely give up anything north of
    50 percent yield. It's usually closer to 40. If you bought a trimmed flat or
    even a whole trimmed brisket, then obviously yields are higher from raw
    weight.

    MartyB



  11. #11
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Smoking meat overnight

    Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    > On Sun, 9 Sep 2012 11:05:02 -0700 (PDT), spamtrap1888
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sep 9, 4:51 am, George Leppla <geo...@cruisemaster.com> wrote:
    >>> Loaded the Bradley smoker late yesterday afternoon with a 14 pound
    >>> brisket and two pork shoulders. A little over 30 pounds of meat.
    >>> Fourteen hours in the smoker at 200 degrees... smoke during the
    >>> first 5. We'll let it cool, cut off enough for tonight's dinner and
    >>> put the
    >>> rest in the refrigerator. Tomorrow we'll run everything through the
    >>> slicer and pack one pound portions in freezer bags.

    >>
    >> How do you reheat it to retain quality? Or do you eat it cold?

    >
    > It's all sliced so it's pretty easy to reheat by several methods, and
    > obviously wouldn't be heated to cooking temperature. Delis keep such
    > meats heated all day with a low temperature steam cabinet... one can
    > make their own at home with one of those covered oval roasters.
    > Defrost the meat in the fridge, place a stack of meat slices on a rack
    > covered with foil in the pan, add a little hot water under the rack
    > (about a cup), cover and place into a 190 oven for 30 minutes. Can
    > be done on the stove top too but one would need to keep a keen eye not
    > to warm too rapidly and/or over heat. How to heat depends a lot on
    > how it will be eaten... for sandwiches it should be heated to like
    > 150 That's probably 2-3 days worth for George and his wife. hehe


    The steam pan method works best if the meat is actually very slightly
    undercooked. If already fully cooked to perfection, more moist heat for that
    long seems like it would just make it turn mushy. Cured meats are somewhat
    different. I know you will see pastrami and corned beef held all day that
    way on steam tables in jus made from the cooking liquids, but I'm not at all
    convinced you can do that with an uncured slow smoke roasted (aka barbecued)
    brisket unless it goes into the pot somewhat undercooked. However I haven't
    been to a true NYC deli since I was a kid and there are a couple famous
    places I would love to try where they make their pastrami and corned beef
    from scratch.

    MartyB



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