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Thread: Smoked turkey drumstick?

  1. #1
    KenK Guest

    Default Smoked turkey drumstick?

    I made a big mistake when I heated up a pre-cooked smoked turkey drumstick
    yesterday for a Thanksgiving meal. I had forgotten how full of cartilage
    they are. Quite difficult to eat. I'm not looking forward to finishing it
    today with the leftover dressing and cranberry sauce. Next time back to my
    usual holiday meal of a small stuffed roast chicken.

    The drumstick was in a package of three. The question is, what to do with
    the other two later? I'm thinking substitute one for a smoked pork shank
    with northern beans or perhaps make 'chicken' stew with browned onions and
    dumplings - cooking all day in a crock pot in both cases to free up some of
    the meat?

    What you think? Other suggestions?

    TIA


    --
    "When you choose the lesser of two evils, always
    remember that it is still an evil." - Max Lerner







  2. #2
    George Leppla Guest

    Default Re: Smoked turkey drumstick?

    KenK wrote:
    > I made a big mistake when I heated up a pre-cooked smoked turkey drumstick
    > yesterday for a Thanksgiving meal. I had forgotten how full of cartilage
    > they are. Quite difficult to eat. I'm not looking forward to finishing it
    > today with the leftover dressing and cranberry sauce. Next time back to my
    > usual holiday meal of a small stuffed roast chicken.
    >
    > The drumstick was in a package of three. The question is, what to do with
    > the other two later? I'm thinking substitute one for a smoked pork shank
    > with northern beans or perhaps make 'chicken' stew with browned onions and
    > dumplings - cooking all day in a crock pot in both cases to free up some of
    > the meat?
    >
    > What you think? Other suggestions?


    I love those turkey legs! The best way to cook them is to wet the leg
    with water and then wrap the leg in aluminum foil, Bake in a pan at 300
    degrees for two hours and the meat will fall off the bones and tendons.
    Put about 1/4 inch of water in the pan. Check after one hour and add
    more if necessary.... don't let the pan run dry.

    Using it when making beans is a great idea as is the crock-pot. Cook
    them long and low and they will be delicious.

    George L

  3. #3
    George Guest

    Default Re: Smoked turkey drumstick?

    KenK wrote:
    > I made a big mistake when I heated up a pre-cooked smoked turkey drumstick
    > yesterday for a Thanksgiving meal. I had forgotten how full of cartilage
    > they are. Quite difficult to eat. I'm not looking forward to finishing it
    > today with the leftover dressing and cranberry sauce. Next time back to my
    > usual holiday meal of a small stuffed roast chicken.
    >
    > The drumstick was in a package of three. The question is, what to do with
    > the other two later? I'm thinking substitute one for a smoked pork shank
    > with northern beans or perhaps make 'chicken' stew with browned onions and
    > dumplings - cooking all day in a crock pot in both cases to free up some of
    > the meat?
    >
    > What you think? Other suggestions?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    >

    I like them. Even though they are "pre-cooked" you need to cook them
    which makes them a lot easier to eat.

  4. #4
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Smoked turkey drumstick?

    KenK wrote:
    >
    > I made a big mistake when I heated up a pre-cooked smoked turkey drumstick
    > yesterday for a Thanksgiving meal. I had forgotten how full of cartilage
    > they are. Quite difficult to eat. I'm not looking forward to finishing it
    > today with the leftover dressing and cranberry sauce. Next time back to my
    > usual holiday meal of a small stuffed roast chicken.


    The larger muscles are easy to separate from
    the cartilage. If you find separating the
    smaller muscles to be too tedious, just skip
    them. Throw 'em away.

  5. #5
    Stan Horwitz Guest

    Default Re: Smoked turkey drumstick?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    George Leppla <[email protected]> wrote:

    > KenK wrote:
    > > I made a big mistake when I heated up a pre-cooked smoked turkey drumstick
    > > yesterday for a Thanksgiving meal. I had forgotten how full of cartilage
    > > they are. Quite difficult to eat. I'm not looking forward to finishing it
    > > today with the leftover dressing and cranberry sauce. Next time back to my
    > > usual holiday meal of a small stuffed roast chicken.
    > >
    > > The drumstick was in a package of three. The question is, what to do with
    > > the other two later? I'm thinking substitute one for a smoked pork shank
    > > with northern beans or perhaps make 'chicken' stew with browned onions and
    > > dumplings - cooking all day in a crock pot in both cases to free up some of
    > > the meat?
    > >
    > > What you think? Other suggestions?

    >
    > I love those turkey legs! The best way to cook them is to wet the leg
    > with water and then wrap the leg in aluminum foil, Bake in a pan at 300
    > degrees for two hours and the meat will fall off the bones and tendons.
    > Put about 1/4 inch of water in the pan. Check after one hour and add
    > more if necessary.... don't let the pan run dry.
    >
    > Using it when making beans is a great idea as is the crock-pot. Cook
    > them long and low and they will be delicious.


    I like those turkey legs too. A sharp knife works fine to free the meat
    from the cartilage. NBD. My suggestion is to simply use a sharp knife to
    cut away the meat from the bone and cartilage and enjoy it.

  6. #6
    Bob Muncie Guest

    Default Re: Smoked turkey drumstick?

    KenK wrote:
    > I made a big mistake when I heated up a pre-cooked smoked turkey drumstick
    > yesterday for a Thanksgiving meal. I had forgotten how full of cartilage
    > they are. Quite difficult to eat. I'm not looking forward to finishing it
    > today with the leftover dressing and cranberry sauce. Next time back to my
    > usual holiday meal of a small stuffed roast chicken.
    >
    > The drumstick was in a package of three. The question is, what to do with
    > the other two later? I'm thinking substitute one for a smoked pork shank
    > with northern beans or perhaps make 'chicken' stew with browned onions and
    > dumplings - cooking all day in a crock pot in both cases to free up some of
    > the meat?
    >
    > What you think? Other suggestions?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    >

    Ken - Why not just foil them, and freeze them?

    Add a date so you don't forget, and enjoy later.

    Bob

  7. #7
    Van Guest

    Default Re: Smoked turkey drumstick?


    "KenK" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I made a big mistake when I heated up a pre-cooked smoked turkey drumstick
    > yesterday . . . .
    >
    > What you think? Other suggestions?
    >
    > TIA
    >


    Use one to flavor a pot of collard greens (instead of a smoked pork hock)!

    Absolutely delicious!!

    Van



  8. #8
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: Smoked turkey drumstick?

    Mark Thorson wrote:

    > KenK wrote:
    >>
    >> I made a big mistake when I heated up a pre-cooked smoked turkey
    >> drumstick yesterday for a Thanksgiving meal. I had forgotten how
    >> full of cartilage they are. Quite difficult to eat. I'm not looking
    >> forward to finishing it today with the leftover dressing and
    >> cranberry sauce. Next time back to my usual holiday meal of a small
    >> stuffed roast chicken.

    >
    > The larger muscles are easy to separate from
    > the cartilage. If you find separating the
    > smaller muscles to be too tedious, just skip
    > them. Throw 'em away.



    Nope, use 'em to make stock...


    --
    Best
    Greg



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