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Thread: Slicing Cheddar Cheese

  1. #1
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Slicing Cheddar Cheese

    I'm finding myself tired of hand-slicing cheddar cheese. The kids here
    often eat my "cheese toast" in quantities best measured by the loaf of
    bread rather than the slice, and that's a lot of cheese to slice.
    (Recipe: cover a slice of bread with thinly sliced sharp cheddar cheese,
    sprinkle a very little powered garlic and black pepper on top,
    bake/broil at a fairly high temperature until golden brown, serve. We
    use a toaster oven set to 400 F.)

    I have never owned or used a "mandoline" - is that what I want here -
    would it work with cheese kept in the refrigerator? The slices need to
    be thin, as much for my pocketbook as for any culinary reason, but it
    doesn't take much cheese to make this work, anyway.

    Thanks in advance.

    -S-



  2. #2
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese

    On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 12:04:15 -0400, "Steve Freides" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I'm finding myself tired of hand-slicing cheddar cheese. The kids here
    >often eat my "cheese toast" in quantities best measured by the loaf of
    >bread rather than the slice, and that's a lot of cheese to slice.
    >(Recipe: cover a slice of bread with thinly sliced sharp cheddar cheese,
    >sprinkle a very little powered garlic and black pepper on top,
    >bake/broil at a fairly high temperature until golden brown, serve. We
    >use a toaster oven set to 400 F.)
    >
    >I have never owned or used a "mandoline" - is that what I want here -
    >would it work with cheese kept in the refrigerator? The slices need to
    >be thin, as much for my pocketbook as for any culinary reason, but it
    >doesn't take much cheese to make this work, anyway.
    >
    >Thanks in advance.


    I'd just shred it. I have a box slicer that's like 25 bucks at an
    asian store and a real mandoline but for what you're doing grating
    would be the fasted. If you have a food processor you can grate a
    pound in 10 seconds.

    Lou

  3. #3
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese

    "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm finding myself tired of hand-slicing cheddar cheese. The kids here
    >often eat my "cheese toast" in quantities best measured by the loaf of
    >bread rather than the slice, and that's a lot of cheese to slice.
    >(Recipe: cover a slice of bread with thinly sliced sharp cheddar cheese,
    >sprinkle a very little powered garlic and black pepper on top,
    >bake/broil at a fairly high temperature until golden brown, serve. We
    >use a toaster oven set to 400 F.)
    >
    >I have never owned or used a "mandoline" - is that what I want here -
    >would it work with cheese kept in the refrigerator? The slices need to
    >be thin, as much for my pocketbook as for any culinary reason, but it
    >doesn't take much cheese to make this work, anyway.


    I wouldn't think a mandolin would work that well with cheese, but I
    haven't tried it.

    My favorite weapon is the Rosle wire cheese slicer-
    http://www.amazon.com/R%C3%B6sle-127.../dp/B000063Y8H

    My wife came home with it & I was doubtful that it would work as well
    as the 'Y' shaped ones. but after a couple years, when I finally
    broke the wire-- I replaced the wire instead of getting the other
    style.

    A meat/cheese slicer is the only power tool that I know of that will
    give you nice thin slices-- but you'd have to want to slice a lot of
    cheese to make cleanup worthwhile.

    How about shredding it? My food processor will shred a pound of
    cheddar in about 90 seconds. Toss the disk and bowl in the DW &
    you're done.

    Jim

  4. #4
    Ross@home Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese

    On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 12:04:15 -0400, "Steve Freides" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I'm finding myself tired of hand-slicing cheddar cheese. The kids here
    >often eat my "cheese toast" in quantities best measured by the loaf of
    >bread rather than the slice, and that's a lot of cheese to slice.
    >(Recipe: cover a slice of bread with thinly sliced sharp cheddar cheese,
    >sprinkle a very little powered garlic and black pepper on top,
    >bake/broil at a fairly high temperature until golden brown, serve. We
    >use a toaster oven set to 400 F.)
    >
    >I have never owned or used a "mandoline" - is that what I want here -
    >would it work with cheese kept in the refrigerator? The slices need to
    >be thin, as much for my pocketbook as for any culinary reason, but it
    >doesn't take much cheese to make this work, anyway.
    >
    >Thanks in advance.
    >
    >-S-
    >


    For that purpose, I think a cheese plane would work well.
    Here's the type of thing I mean. There are lots of different brands.
    http://www.kitchenniche.ca/cheese-plane-p-1226.html

    Ross.

  5. #5
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese

    Steve,

    Hard cheese like cheddar would shred usin a mandoline, also requiring a
    lot of elbow grease if it could possibly even work and probably stress
    the blade and bend or brake it.

    I use a cheese slicer that's a wire and a roller on a simple handle. The
    roller can be knob adjusted for the thickness of slices you want (closer
    to or farther from the wire). They are wide enough to cut most common
    bread slices. The operation is very smooth.

    Easily available online or in stores for a handful of dollars.

    Best,

    Andy

  6. #6
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese

    On Aug 15, 10:05*am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:

    >
    > Easily available online or in stores for a handful of dollars.
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > Andy


    A handful of dollars...wtf does that mean? $500? $3?

  7. #7
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese


    "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j2bg1g$ior$[email protected]..
    > I'm finding myself tired of hand-slicing cheddar cheese. The kids here
    > often eat my "cheese toast" in quantities best measured by the loaf of
    > bread rather than the slice, and that's a lot of cheese to slice. (Recipe:
    > cover a slice of bread with thinly sliced sharp cheddar cheese, sprinkle a
    > very little powered garlic and black pepper on top, bake/broil at a fairly
    > high temperature until golden brown, serve. We use a toaster oven set to
    > 400 F.)
    >
    > I have never owned or used a "mandoline" - is that what I want here -
    > would it work with cheese kept in the refrigerator? The slices need to be
    > thin, as much for my pocketbook as for any culinary reason, but it doesn't
    > take much cheese to make this work, anyway.
    >
    > Thanks in advance.



    Buy it in bulk and ask them to slice it for you.

    Paul



  8. #8
    Dora Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese

    Steve Freides wrote:
    > I'm finding myself tired of hand-slicing cheddar cheese. The kids
    > here often eat my "cheese toast" in quantities best measured by the
    > loaf of bread rather than the slice, and that's a lot of cheese to
    > slice. (Recipe: cover a slice of bread with thinly sliced sharp
    > cheddar cheese, sprinkle a very little powered garlic and black
    > pepper on top, bake/broil at a fairly high temperature until golden
    > brown, serve. We use a toaster oven set to 400 F.)
    >
    > I have never owned or used a "mandoline" - is that what I want
    > here -
    > would it work with cheese kept in the refrigerator? The slices need
    > to be thin, as much for my pocketbook as for any culinary reason,
    > but
    > it doesn't take much cheese to make this work, anyway.
    >
    > Thanks in advance.
    >
    > -S-


    Why go to the expense of a mandoline for this - and it may clog
    anyway? Since you're going to bake/broil, I think Lou's is a great
    suggestion and the quickest.


  9. #9
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese


    On 15-Aug-2011, "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm finding myself tired of hand-slicing cheddar cheese.

    <snip>
    > I have never owned or used a "mandoline" - is that what I want here -
    > would it work with cheese kept in the refrigerator? The slices need to
    > be thin,

    <more snip>

    For the job you describe I use a wire cheese slicer that allows adjusting
    thickness. The one I use is very similar to this one at Amazon:
    http://www.amazon.com/Progressive-Ho...3430655&sr=1-7
    or
    http://tinyurl.com/WireCheeseSlicer

    --

    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  10. #10
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese

    "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j2bg1g$ior$[email protected]..
    ....
    > I have never owned or used a "mandoline" - is that what I want here -
    > would it work with cheese kept in the refrigerator? The slices need to be
    > thin, as much for my pocketbook as for any culinary reason, but it doesn't
    > take much cheese to make this work, anyway.


    Have to go with Lou and others here, just grate it. I used to hand cut with
    a knife very thin slices of cheddar for what I had had for lunch, which was
    two thick slices of sourdough drizzled with EVOO and sliced tomatoes with
    black pepper, garlic powder and dried basil (my basil crop failed this year
    :-( )

    http://oi56.tinypic.com/34rt9ue.jpg

    Grating is easy, and allows me perfect control over how much cheddar exactly
    where. And it melts very evenly and quickly too! YUM!

    John Kuthe...



  11. #11
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese

    On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 10:20:54 -0700, "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:j2bg1g$ior$[email protected]..
    >> I'm finding myself tired of hand-slicing cheddar cheese. The kids here
    >> often eat my "cheese toast" in quantities best measured by the loaf of
    >> bread rather than the slice, and that's a lot of cheese to slice. (Recipe:
    >> cover a slice of bread with thinly sliced sharp cheddar cheese, sprinkle a
    >> very little powered garlic and black pepper on top, bake/broil at a fairly
    >> high temperature until golden brown, serve. We use a toaster oven set to
    >> 400 F.)
    >>
    >> I have never owned or used a "mandoline" - is that what I want here -
    >> would it work with cheese kept in the refrigerator? The slices need to be
    >> thin, as much for my pocketbook as for any culinary reason, but it doesn't
    >> take much cheese to make this work, anyway.
    >>
    >> Thanks in advance.

    >
    >
    >Buy it in bulk and ask them to slice it for you.
    >
    >Paul
    >

    Around here you don't have to buy in bulk to have your deli stuff
    sliced. But for cheese it sticks together unless you have them slice
    it thick which it seems Steve doesn't want. Also when it's sliced it
    drastically reduces fridge shelf life time.


    Lou

  12. #12
    Jerry Avins Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese

    On Aug 15, 1:53*pm, "l, not -l" <lal...@cujo.com> wrote:
    > On 15-Aug-2011, "Steve Freides" <st...@kbnj.com> wrote:
    >
    > > I'm finding myself tired of hand-slicing cheddar cheese.

    > <snip>
    > > I have never owned or used a "mandoline" - is that what I want here -
    > > would it work with cheese kept in the refrigerator? *The slices need to
    > > be thin,

    >
    > <more snip>
    >
    > For the job you describe I use a wire cheese slicer that allows adjusting
    > thickness. *The one I use is very similar to this one at Amazon:http://www.amazon.com/Progressive-Ho...eese-Slicer/dp...
    > *orhttp://tinyurl.com/WireCheeseSlicer


    The roller rattles around on most of those. When people have asked me
    where I got my firm one, I have to tell them that I made the roller
    myself.

    Jerry
    --
    Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can
    get.

  13. #13
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese


    "Lou Decruss" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 10:20:54 -0700, "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:j2bg1g$ior$[email protected]..
    >>> I'm finding myself tired of hand-slicing cheddar cheese. The kids here
    >>> often eat my "cheese toast" in quantities best measured by the loaf of
    >>> bread rather than the slice, and that's a lot of cheese to slice.
    >>> (Recipe:
    >>> cover a slice of bread with thinly sliced sharp cheddar cheese, sprinkle
    >>> a
    >>> very little powered garlic and black pepper on top, bake/broil at a
    >>> fairly
    >>> high temperature until golden brown, serve. We use a toaster oven set
    >>> to
    >>> 400 F.)
    >>>
    >>> I have never owned or used a "mandoline" - is that what I want here -
    >>> would it work with cheese kept in the refrigerator? The slices need to
    >>> be
    >>> thin, as much for my pocketbook as for any culinary reason, but it
    >>> doesn't
    >>> take much cheese to make this work, anyway.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks in advance.

    >>
    >>
    >>Buy it in bulk and ask them to slice it for you.
    >>
    >>Paul
    >>

    > Around here you don't have to buy in bulk to have your deli stuff
    > sliced. But for cheese it sticks together unless you have them slice
    > it thick which it seems Steve doesn't want. Also when it's sliced it
    > drastically reduces fridge shelf life time.


    I used to work in a cafeteria and we sliced cheese by the ton with a rotary
    slicer. Never clogged and we sliced it thin.

    Paul



  14. #14
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese

    On 8/15/2011 10:04 AM, Steve Freides wrote:
    > I'm finding myself tired of hand-slicing cheddar cheese.


    >
    > I have never owned or used a "mandoline" - is that what I want here -
    > would it work with cheese kept in the refrigerator? The slices need to
    > be thin, as much for my pocketbook as for any culinary reason, but it
    > doesn't take much cheese to make this work, anyway.
    >
    > Thanks in advance.
    >
    > -S-
    >
    >


    Depending on whether your cheddar is on the softer or drier side,
    a mandoline blade will either gum up or work quite well.

    Another way of preparing the cheese is to grate it on a fairly
    large-hole grater. We usually do that for quesadillas and other
    Mexican-style dishes where melted cheese is called for. It cuts
    through a block of cheese quite quickly.

    gloria p

  15. #15
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese

    Il 15/08/2011 18:04, Steve Freides ha scritto:

    > I'm finding myself tired of hand-slicing cheddar cheese. The kids here
    > often eat my "cheese toast" in quantities best measured by the loaf of
    > bread rather than the slice, and that's a lot of cheese to slice.


    Freakin' use your knife and STFU or just pay a nubian slave to grate
    cheddar for you.
    ROTFL
    --
    Vilco
    And the Family Stone
    Caschi come il cacio sui maccheroni, cerchiamo giusto gente come te.

  16. #16
    Dora Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese

    Paul M. Cook wrote:
    > I used to work in a cafeteria and we sliced cheese by the ton with a
    > rotary slicer. Never clogged and we sliced it thin.
    >
    > Paul


    But thin slices stick together in the refrigerator unless they're
    separated with paper (then they stick to the paper!).


  17. #17
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese

    Lou Decruss wrote:
    > On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 12:04:15 -0400, "Steve Freides" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> I'm finding myself tired of hand-slicing cheddar cheese. The kids
    >> here often eat my "cheese toast" in quantities best measured by the
    >> loaf of bread rather than the slice, and that's a lot of cheese to
    >> slice. (Recipe: cover a slice of bread with thinly sliced sharp
    >> cheddar cheese, sprinkle a very little powered garlic and black
    >> pepper on top, bake/broil at a fairly high temperature until golden
    >> brown, serve. We use a toaster oven set to 400 F.)
    >>
    >> I have never owned or used a "mandoline" - is that what I want here -
    >> would it work with cheese kept in the refrigerator? The slices need
    >> to be thin, as much for my pocketbook as for any culinary reason,
    >> but it doesn't take much cheese to make this work, anyway.
    >>
    >> Thanks in advance.

    >
    > I'd just shred it. I have a box slicer that's like 25 bucks at an
    > asian store and a real mandoline but for what you're doing grating
    > would be the fasted. If you have a food processor you can grate a
    > pound in 10 seconds.
    >
    > Lou


    Thank you and thanks to everyone else for their replies.

    An interesting question (well, to me, anyway) would be if I end up using
    more cheese if it's grated. My guess is that the answer to that is yes,
    but it will be easy enough for me to adjust the amount of grated cheese
    I put on these things.

    I've got my little Sunbeam Oskar, which ought to be well suited to this
    job - we don't keep the big food processor readily available because we
    don't use it much, but the little one gets used often and cleanup is
    pretty easy.

    -S-



  18. #18
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese

    On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 10:13:59 -0700 (PDT), Chemo the Clown
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Aug 15, 10:05*am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Easily available online or in stores for a handful of dollars.
    > >
    > > Best,
    > >
    > > Andy

    >
    > A handful of dollars...wtf does that mean? $500? $3?


    Nearer to three, but I got the idea from the OP that he doesn't want
    to use that type.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila.

  19. #19
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese

    On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 13:28:05 -0400, "Dora" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Why go to the expense of a mandoline for this - and it may clog
    > anyway? Since you're going to bake/broil, I think Lou's is a great
    > suggestion and the quickest.


    Or put it in the Cuisinart with the narrowest slicing blade and let
    'er rip.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila.

  20. #20
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: Slicing Cheddar Cheese

    I think you will use less, best way to figure it is cut a slice you would
    use, then grate the same amount and see how it compares, one of the weight
    loss trick i have learned along the way is to freeze cheese and grate over
    food, you get flavor but less calories, Lee
    "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j2c37r$44e$[email protected]..
    > Lou Decruss wrote:
    >> On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 12:04:15 -0400, "Steve Freides" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I'm finding myself tired of hand-slicing cheddar cheese. The kids
    >>> here often eat my "cheese toast" in quantities best measured by the
    >>> loaf of bread rather than the slice, and that's a lot of cheese to
    >>> slice. (Recipe: cover a slice of bread with thinly sliced sharp
    >>> cheddar cheese, sprinkle a very little powered garlic and black
    >>> pepper on top, bake/broil at a fairly high temperature until golden
    >>> brown, serve. We use a toaster oven set to 400 F.)
    >>>
    >>> I have never owned or used a "mandoline" - is that what I want here -
    >>> would it work with cheese kept in the refrigerator? The slices need
    >>> to be thin, as much for my pocketbook as for any culinary reason,
    >>> but it doesn't take much cheese to make this work, anyway.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks in advance.

    >>
    >> I'd just shred it. I have a box slicer that's like 25 bucks at an
    >> asian store and a real mandoline but for what you're doing grating
    >> would be the fasted. If you have a food processor you can grate a
    >> pound in 10 seconds.
    >>
    >> Lou

    >
    > Thank you and thanks to everyone else for their replies.
    >
    > An interesting question (well, to me, anyway) would be if I end up using
    > more cheese if it's grated. My guess is that the answer to that is yes,
    > but it will be easy enough for me to adjust the amount of grated cheese I
    > put on these things.
    >
    > I've got my little Sunbeam Oskar, which ought to be well suited to this
    > job - we don't keep the big food processor readily available because we
    > don't use it much, but the little one gets used often and cleanup is
    > pretty easy.
    >
    > -S-
    >
    >




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