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Thread: Skillet vs. Dutch oven

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Skillet vs. Dutch oven

    If I have a recipe that calls for using a skillet, but I feel things would fit
    better in a low sided Dutch oven, will it make much difference in the way things
    cook? Case in point is a chicken cacciatore recipe I want to make and I don't
    think all the chicken will fit in my biggest skillet/fry pan. Recipe calls for
    browning the chicken and taking it out of the pan, then cooking the veggies,
    onion, pepper, garlic and tomatoes, in the pan then returning chicken and
    simmering for a half hour of so. Would it matter what kind of pan I'm using,
    giving this cooking method? I know I could do two batches but I'd rather do it
    in one pan. Thanks.

  2. #2
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Skillet vs. Dutch oven

    On 2/16/2012 10:03 AM, [email protected] wrote:
    > If I have a recipe that calls for using a skillet, but I feel things would fit
    > better in a low sided Dutch oven, will it make much difference in the way things
    > cook? Case in point is a chicken cacciatore recipe I want to make and I don't
    > think all the chicken will fit in my biggest skillet/fry pan. Recipe calls for
    > browning the chicken and taking it out of the pan, then cooking the veggies,
    > onion, pepper, garlic and tomatoes, in the pan then returning chicken and
    > simmering for a half hour of so. Would it matter what kind of pan I'm using,
    > giving this cooking method? I know I could do two batches but I'd rather do it
    > in one pan. Thanks.


    Feel free to use practically anything in place of a frying pan. I used
    to cook stuff like that in a wok and it works great. The thing you
    should avoid is an undersized pan.

  3. #3
    [email protected] Guest

  4. #4
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Skillet vs. Dutch oven

    On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 15:03:24 -0500, [email protected] wrote:

    > If I have a recipe that calls for using a skillet, but I feel things would fit
    > better in a low sided Dutch oven, will it make much difference in the way things
    > cook? Case in point is a chicken cacciatore recipe I want to make and I don't
    > think all the chicken will fit in my biggest skillet/fry pan. Recipe calls for
    > browning the chicken and taking it out of the pan, then cooking the veggies,
    > onion, pepper, garlic and tomatoes, in the pan then returning chicken and
    > simmering for a half hour of so. Would it matter what kind of pan I'm using,
    > giving this cooking method? I know I could do two batches but I'd rather do it
    > in one pan. Thanks.


    I don't see why it wouldn't work. Are you using an enameled dutch
    oven? The tomato acid could ruin the seasoning on your pot if it's
    not.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  5. #5
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

  6. #6
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Skillet vs. Dutch oven

    On Feb 16, 3:03*pm, rfd...@optonline.net wrote:
    > If I have a recipe that calls for using a skillet, but I feel things would fit
    > better in a low sided Dutch oven, will it make much difference in the waythings
    > cook? Case in point is a chicken cacciatore recipe I want to make and I don't
    > think all the chicken will fit in my biggest skillet/fry pan. Recipe calls for
    > browning the chicken and taking it out of the pan, then cooking the veggies,
    > onion, pepper, garlic and tomatoes, in the pan then returning chicken and
    > simmering for a half hour of so. Would it matter what kind of pan I'm using,
    > giving this cooking method? I know I could do two batches but I'd rather do it
    > in one pan. Thanks.


    I use something called a chicken fryer - think of a straight sided
    skillet, but about half the depth of a Dutch oven. It would be my
    desert island pan if I were forced to choose.


  7. #7
    Chas Guest

    Default Skillet vs. Dutch oven

    I use something called a chicken fryer - think of a straight sided
    skillet, but about half the depth of a Dutch oven. It would be my
    desert island pan if I were forced to choose.
    *****************
    I have one also (1.75 in. sides) and love it for the hugh amount it will
    hold easily. Only drawback I see is that it is next to impossible to 'toss'
    with the 90 degree sides.. . .it's spatula time.
    .. . . .chas



  8. #8
    David Dyer-Bennet Guest

    Default Re: Skillet vs. Dutch oven

    [email protected] writes:

    > If I have a recipe that calls for using a skillet, but I feel things would fit
    > better in a low sided Dutch oven, will it make much difference in the way things
    > cook? Case in point is a chicken cacciatore recipe I want to make and I don't
    > think all the chicken will fit in my biggest skillet/fry pan. Recipe calls for
    > browning the chicken and taking it out of the pan, then cooking the veggies,
    > onion, pepper, garlic and tomatoes, in the pan then returning chicken and
    > simmering for a half hour of so. Would it matter what kind of pan I'm using,
    > giving this cooking method? I know I could do two batches but I'd rather do it
    > in one pan. Thanks.


    As others have said, the big problem is a too-small pan, leading to food
    piled up and only the bottom layer frying. A secondary problem can be
    uneven heat, if the pan has too thin a bottom; this can be a problem for
    either frying or simmering.

    If you use a pan with enough bottom area, and good enough heat
    distribution for both steps (possibly using an external heat spreader if
    you need to), the height of the sides is completely unimportant.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, [email protected]; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info

  9. #9
    David Dyer-Bennet Guest

    Default Re: Skillet vs. Dutch oven

    Kalmia <[email protected]> writes:

    > On Feb 16, 3:03*pm, rfd...@optonline.net wrote:
    >> If I have a recipe that calls for using a skillet, but I feel things would fit
    >> better in a low sided Dutch oven, will it make much difference in the way things
    >> cook? Case in point is a chicken cacciatore recipe I want to make and I don't
    >> think all the chicken will fit in my biggest skillet/fry pan. Recipe calls for
    >> browning the chicken and taking it out of the pan, then cooking the veggies,
    >> onion, pepper, garlic and tomatoes, in the pan then returning chicken and
    >> simmering for a half hour of so. Would it matter what kind of pan I'm using,
    >> giving this cooking method? I know I could do two batches but I'd rather do it
    >> in one pan. Thanks.

    >
    > I use something called a chicken fryer - think of a straight sided
    > skillet, but about half the depth of a Dutch oven. It would be my
    > desert island pan if I were forced to choose.


    One of those is my favorite pan as well.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, [email protected]; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info

  10. #10
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Skillet vs. Dutch oven


    "dsi1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jhjoub$cbm$[email protected]..
    > On 2/16/2012 10:03 AM, [email protected] wrote:
    >> If I have a recipe that calls for using a skillet, but I feel things
    >> would fit
    >> better in a low sided Dutch oven, will it make much difference in the way
    >> things
    >> cook? Case in point is a chicken cacciatore recipe I want to make and I
    >> don't
    >> think all the chicken will fit in my biggest skillet/fry pan. Recipe
    >> calls for
    >> browning the chicken and taking it out of the pan, then cooking the
    >> veggies,
    >> onion, pepper, garlic and tomatoes,

    (snip OP and the reply)

    If you're talking about a cast iron skillet or dutch oven, don't cook
    something containing tomatoes. Cast iron doesn't react well to it. I would
    use a stainless steel dutch oven.

    Jill


  11. #11
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Skillet vs. Dutch oven

    On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 15:03:24 -0500, [email protected] wrote:

    >If I have a recipe that calls for using a skillet, but I feel things would fit
    >better in a low sided Dutch oven, will it make much difference in the way things
    >cook? Case in point is a chicken cacciatore recipe I want to make and I don't
    >think all the chicken will fit in my biggest skillet/fry pan. Recipe calls for
    >browning the chicken and taking it out of the pan, then cooking the veggies,
    >onion, pepper, garlic and tomatoes, in the pan then returning chicken and
    >simmering for a half hour of so. Would it matter what kind of pan I'm using,
    >giving this cooking method? I know I could do two batches but I'd rather do it
    >in one pan. Thanks.



    It is not a matter of depth, it is a matter of surface area. When you
    brown the chicken, there should be a good amount of space around it.
    Too close, the parts will not brown as well and get a sort of steamed
    finish instead. You can use the Dutch oven, but don't pile them more
    than a single layer and give some breathing space.

    Same with the veggies. Too many in there and they will not cook
    properly. If need be, use multiple batches. Once everything is
    browned, you can load up the pot for the next step.

  12. #12
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Skillet vs. Dutch oven

    <rfdjr1@op[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > If I have a recipe that calls for using a skillet, but I feel things would
    > fit
    > better in a low sided Dutch oven, will it make much difference in the way
    > things
    > cook? Case in point is a chicken cacciatore recipe I want to make and I
    > don't
    > think all the chicken will fit in my biggest skillet/fry pan. Recipe calls
    > for
    > browning the chicken and taking it out of the pan, then cooking the
    > veggies,
    > onion, pepper, garlic and tomatoes, in the pan then returning chicken and
    > simmering for a half hour of so. Would it matter what kind of pan I'm
    > using,
    > giving this cooking method? I know I could do two batches but I'd rather
    > do it
    > in one pan. Thanks.



    If you are cooking a recipe that calls for simmering with the lid on then
    there is little difference. If you're cooking or simmering with the lid off
    then there is a small difference in the evaporation rate based upon the
    surface area and the height of the sides.

    Dimitri


  13. #13
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Skillet vs. Dutch oven

    On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 22:10:28 -0500, Ed Pawlowski <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 15:03:24 -0500, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >>If I have a recipe that calls for using a skillet, but I feel things would fit
    >>better in a low sided Dutch oven, will it make much difference in the way things
    >>cook? Case in point is a chicken cacciatore recipe I want to make and I don't
    >>think all the chicken will fit in my biggest skillet/fry pan. Recipe calls for
    >>browning the chicken and taking it out of the pan, then cooking the veggies,
    >>onion, pepper, garlic and tomatoes, in the pan then returning chicken and
    >>simmering for a half hour of so. Would it matter what kind of pan I'm using,
    >>giving this cooking method? I know I could do two batches but I'd rather do it
    >>in one pan. Thanks.

    >
    >
    >It is not a matter of depth, it is a matter of surface area. When you
    >brown the chicken, there should be a good amount of space around it.
    >Too close, the parts will not brown as well and get a sort of steamed
    >finish instead. You can use the Dutch oven, but don't pile them more
    >than a single layer and give some breathing space.
    >
    >Same with the veggies. Too many in there and they will not cook
    >properly. If need be, use multiple batches. Once everything is
    >browned, you can load up the pot for the next step.


    Frying in a high sided pot also saves a lot of clean up... I never fry
    meat in a frying pan, I use a braisier and don't need to clean my
    stove. Cookware like this:
    http://www.amazon.com/Sitram-Profise...&sr=1-22-spell

  14. #14
    David Dyer-Bennet Guest

    Default Re: Skillet vs. Dutch oven

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> writes:

    > "dsi1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:jhjoub$cbm$[email protected]..
    >> On 2/16/2012 10:03 AM, [email protected] wrote:
    >>> If I have a recipe that calls for using a skillet, but I feel
    >>> things would fit
    >>> better in a low sided Dutch oven, will it make much difference in
    >>> the way things
    >>> cook? Case in point is a chicken cacciatore recipe I want to make
    >>> and I don't
    >>> think all the chicken will fit in my biggest skillet/fry
    >>> pan. Recipe calls for
    >>> browning the chicken and taking it out of the pan, then cooking the
    >>> veggies,
    >>> onion, pepper, garlic and tomatoes,

    > (snip OP and the reply)
    >
    > If you're talking about a cast iron skillet or dutch oven, don't cook
    > something containing tomatoes. Cast iron doesn't react well to it. I
    > would use a stainless steel dutch oven.


    I've made endless batches of spaghetti sauce and of chili, both
    containing tomatoes in various forms, in my cast iron chicken fryer.
    They're not the best on the seasoning, but seasoning is easy.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, [email protected]; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info

  15. #15
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Skillet vs. Dutch oven

    On Feb 17, 7:36*am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    > Frying in a high sided pot also saves a lot of clean up... I never fry
    > meat in a frying pan, I use a braisier


    Must.. resist.. temptation..


  16. #16
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Skillet vs. Dutch oven

    spamtrap1888 <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Feb 17, 7:36 am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    >> Frying in a high sided pot also saves a lot of clean up... I never
    >> fry meat in a frying pan, I use a braisier

    >
    > Must.. resist.. temptation..


    There is seldom a fatter target or lower hanging fruit than Shemp.



  17. #17
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Skillet vs. Dutch oven

    On Fri, 17 Feb 2012 14:30:40 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >spamtrap1888 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On Feb 17, 7:36 am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Frying in a high sided pot also saves a lot of clean up... I never
    >>> fry meat in a frying pan, I use a braisier

    >>
    >> Must.. resist.. temptation..

    >
    >There is seldom a fatter target or lower hanging fruit than Shemp.
    >

    I'm glad the name has caught on but please don't capitalize her name.
    <EG>

    Lou

  18. #18
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Skillet vs. Dutch oven

    On Fri, 17 Feb 2012 10:01:00 -0800 (PST), spamtrap1888
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Feb 17, 7:36*am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    >> Frying in a high sided pot also saves a lot of clean up... I never fry
    >> meat in a frying pan, I use a braisier

    >
    >Must.. resist.. temptation..


    There are several acceptable spellings:
    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/brasier
    And I have the perfect alibi... I normally would have typed brassiere.

  19. #19
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Skillet vs. Dutch oven

    Lou Decruss <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Fri, 17 Feb 2012 14:30:40 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> spamtrap1888 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> On Feb 17, 7:36 am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Frying in a high sided pot also saves a lot of clean up... I never
    >>>> fry meat in a frying pan, I use a braisier
    >>>
    >>> Must.. resist.. temptation..

    >>
    >> There is seldom a fatter target or lower hanging fruit than Shemp.
    >>

    > I'm glad the name has caught on but please don't capitalize her name.
    > <EG>
    >
    > Lou


    I do so in deference to the real Shemp, a thespian of high honor and great
    professional renown, whose constant reprisals of the same role made his name
    synonymous with stooge.

    ;-)



  20. #20
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Skillet vs. Dutch oven

    On Fri, 17 Feb 2012 18:13:43 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Lou Decruss <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On Fri, 17 Feb 2012 14:30:40 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> spamtrap1888 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>> On Feb 17, 7:36 am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Frying in a high sided pot also saves a lot of clean up... I never
    >>>>> fry meat in a frying pan, I use a braisier
    >>>>
    >>>> Must.. resist.. temptation..
    >>>
    >>> There is seldom a fatter target or lower hanging fruit than Shemp.
    >>>

    >> I'm glad the name has caught on but please don't capitalize her name.
    >> <EG>
    >>
    >> Lou

    >
    >I do so in deference to the real Shemp, a thespian of high honor and great
    >professional renown, whose constant reprisals of the same role made his name
    >synonymous with stooge.


    Ha!..OK! I love the stooges. They have two hours of them on an OTA
    sub channel on Sunday morning. It's at 2:00 am but I usually catch at
    least some of it.

    Lou

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